Vinod Kambli

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Vinod Kambli

Postby raja » Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:09 am

Good piece about him, his life, his cricket.

He deserved more chances to play for BCCI, especially in Test cricket. It wasn't like BCCI was overflowing with batting talent in those days.

There's a lot of local reference here (to Mumbai) and a fair amount of Hindi/Marathi but even for those who don't get these references, it's a decent read.

For those who don't know, Kambli came from extremely humble beginnings, and was from a lower-caste. (This, in India, comes with a lot of baggage).

Some references:
Azharuddin had a Merc, Kapil had a BMW, Kambli had a Kinetic Honda (a popular 'common man" scooter at the time).
Bhendi Bazaar (where he grew up initially is often considered the underbelly of Mumbai, somewhat like the Bronx in New York was once upon a time).

http://indianexpress.com/article/sports ... i-4944083/

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Mick180461 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:00 am

Yes one of those real strange ones that pop up in Cricket, averaging 50+ after 17 tests then dissapears from Test Cricket. Cant say i agree about lack of talent. Azharudin was still playing, Tendulkar and Ganguly had just emerged and Dravid was just about to.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby raja » Sun Nov 19, 2017 3:50 pm

Well, Ajay Jadeja's career coincided with Kambli's career.
And while Jadeja was a fine one-day player (and a terrific fielder), I think Kambli was the better Test batsman.
Jadeja was taken on tour to South Africa (1992-93), England (1996), West Indies (1997), New Zealand (1998).
Check his stats - they're very poor.
He has a 96 in St. John's in a dead match (first 3 days were washed out by rain, so both teams could bat just once.
Other than this, he has a terrible overseas Test record.

Kambli's career ended abruptly in 1995, after just 3 years of Test cricket - with an average of 54!
Except for one tour of New Zealand (where he played just one Test), he played only home Tests.
(And a tour of SL where he got two hundreds.)

Considering Jadeja's Test career spanned from 1992 to 2000 (and he was a suspect in the whole match-fixing saga, though nothing was conclusive), you have to wonder whether Azhar and he had a deal going.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Paddles » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:54 am

Short ball issues ended Kambli's test career in 1995. In ODI's he continued to struggle from 1995 to 2000, barely making runs bar a 100 vs Zimbabwe in India in 1996.

His 50 plus test average overlooks the fact that after 7 games he was rivalling Bradman at about 100, only to plummet in the next 10 tests as New Zealand and the West Indies worked him over, mostly on Indian pitches!

The MRF pace academy isn't just helping Indian fast bowlers, it will help transition and ready players at Ranji level for the next level. In fact, a cynic may say it really has helped Indian batting at international level more than Indian bowling.

Jadeja played less tests over a longer period than Kambli, so he hardly took Kambli's test spot. Jadeja was an ODI star tho. He was clearing the boundary with ease before it was commonplace for specialist middle order batsmen to do so. If he was fixing games, and I make no allegations here, but if he was, my oh my he could have been something more special, because his overall record, for the era, is pretty useful.
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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:24 am

My views. I hail from Bombay (Mumbai) the same city as Tendulkar and Kambli.

Both Tendulkar and Kambli went to the same coach Achrekar who was a strict disciplinarian. In schools cricket, Giles Shield and Harris Shield, Tendulkar and Kambli set the scoreboard afire with their partnerships, there was a record too at that time. It can came in the newspapers and they were noticed as schoolboys who would make a mark in the future.

Achrekar surprisingly rated Kambli higher than Tendulkar. Tendulkar came from a lower middle class family in Mumbai, while Kambli came from a poor background, he was brought up is a slum.

Kambli was flamboyant and loved the pleasures of life. Tendulkar was very grounded and knew his humble origins. He was very disciplined and meticulous in training. Tendulkar had a godfather in Sunil Gavaskar and Ravi Shastri who fast tracked his selection in Mumbai Ranji team. Subsequently, Tendulkar showed his mettle and was selected at the tender age of 16 to play in the Indian National Team to tour Pakistan.

Kambli was later selected and made his debut in 1993.He started with a bang with back to back double hundreds against England and Zimbabwe.

Kambli had a weakness against the short ball as Paddles rightly mentioned. He was exposed by Walsh and other WI pacers.

Kambli later lost his way with his drinking addiction and womanising ways. He later converted to Christianity and had a love marriage.

Kambli then got dropped, made a successful comeback had a career threatening injury (he dislocated his knee while fielding, I think and was carried off the field in pain) and was never selected again.

Kambli was bitter in life that his childhood friend Tendulkar never helped him while he was in trouble or even in the team. He is still a compulsive drinker, whether he has reformed, I dont know.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:37 am

About Jadeja, I rate him one of the most ruthless captains to have ever captained India, at par with a Hansie Cronje or Jardine.

He had several close in catchers, was a brilliant strategist, he captained India in ODIs only briefly.

He had a certain kind of ruthlessness has a captain even with his limited team, I can probably only relate to a Jardine or Cronje. Win at all costs style.

Ajay Jadeja was from a royal family and his relatives included Duleepsinghji and Ranjitsinghji after whom Duleep Trophy and Ranji Trophy is named.He was implicated in the match fixing scandal and that was the end of his career.

Jadeja's one knock I would remember is 1996 World Cup quarter final V/s Pakistan. He hammered Waqar Younis and that knock won India the match.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:16 am

Vinod Kambli can go out of sight but never out of mind

Vinod Kambli walks towards the communal toilet with a bucket in hand. It’s mid-90’s, he has smashed couple of double tons for India, rings discarded by Kapil Dev as bad luck hug his ears and his hair streaks are coloured. He is in the queue at a run-down Worli chawl. His home then. The people ahead of him ask him to go to the loo first. It was the only privilege he had during his early days of cricket with India.

It couldn’t have been more starkly different from the rumblings in the outer world: Oh, the fame has got to his head, he drinks, parties hard, can’t handle money, and doesn’t appreciate what cricket has got him in life.

The reality was something else. In ’93, during a match in Mumbai, Mohammad Azharuddin would float in to Taj in his Mercedes. Kapil Dev glided in his BMW. Sachin Tendulkar too came in a car. Kambli vroomed in on his first vehicle he purchased after becoming India player: a Kinetic Honda. “The Darban used to come, and I would give him the key and say, “Yeh lo mera gaadi laga lo.” He would ask whether he could park it in between the Mercedes and the BMW and I would say Haan haan laga do. Everybody would wait for the valet to get their car na, I also would wait and say, “Mera bike laao. Then hoonnnnnnn karke I would go sabse jyaada stylishly. People would follow me on the bike. From Taj every day to chawl. I sold it off to someone in Pune.”

24 years later, Kambli still has that sunny childish laughter. We are at a restaurant in Bandra, walking distance from his home but one he normally avoids as its too expensive. He is now married to Andrea, who used to be a model (Tanishq jewellery’s first model, he reminds), and has two kids Jesus Christiano and Joanna Christiano. Kambli is now a Christian. “We followed all religions from childhood, when I was wearing that Saibaba amulet in my playing days, I used to also do the cross-sign. I converted on my own will because I found peace and it has really changed me. When people say something negative to me on twitter, I just say God Bless you. It has mellowed me down.”

He considers his second marriage to an “understanding partner” a miracle, his survival after he collapsed in a car the second miracle, and is still surprised at the affection he evokes in fans. “I feel blessed. I still ask the father in confession, why am I still loved, why did I survive that car episode, and got the answer that ‘He loves me, wants something good to happen in my life”.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:17 am

His Twitter feed can get all religious: gospel quotes, Christ talk, and as the chat meanders for hours, first in that restaurant, and then at his home couple of days later, the penny drops. He is looking for resurrection – for his kids, his wife, and himself. It’s not going to be easy ride for sure.
***

It never was. Clustered among 22 people in a chawl room, where they would cook and bath in the small space, he grew up in Bhendi Bazaar. This was before the family shifted to Kanjurmarg, and before he took refuge at a friend’s house in Worli chawl during his India days. Cricket consumed him at Bhendi bazaar. A small strip of pitch lay centred in that chawl. “Two runs if it went to first floor, four if it reached second. I would clear easily.” Father Ganpat, a cricketer (“Fast bowler, very quick”) and a mechanic, would be a worried man. It wasn’t easy being a boy at Bhendi. Several youth were from one gang or another, Kambli says, and his friends too were beginning their dalliance with the underworld elements. Ganpat grew restless, and strict. “He would at times beat me, worried that I would join my friends, and if it wasn’t for cricket, I surely would have joined them.” Ganpat yanked the family to Kanjurmarg, looking for some peace.

Years later, that experience would come in handy when Kambli portrayed a mechanic, and a friend with underworld gangsters in a movie Annarth. A movie where he danced, used mumbaiya slang, did comedy with Johhny Lever, and where he nearly died, while playing a dead body. He remembers the early morning shoot at Vashi where his character was to get killed. For the scene, they had to use a crane to fish out his dead body.

“I had to get on to the crane and lay there as a dead body. The crane took me deep into the water. And when the crane was coming up, my leg got stuck in the crane. I was still underwater. I somehow signalled to them, and they saw me and picked me up. I completed that shot with my injured toe. Very dangerous because nobody was around. Irony is, I almost got killed while playing a dead-body.”

***

Irony has tailed him through his life. His two most personal moments had come publicly, and castigated him in bad light. The infamous crying after ’96 World Cup semi-final, and a lie-detector moment on a TV show where he said Sachin Tendulkar could have helped him more. His two most vulnerable moments – cry for help of sorts – had left him with much infamy. Irony was dancing on his life stage.

He remembers both incidents with a perplexed memory. First that night from hell at Eden Gardens, Kolkata. “If someone in your family expires, would you cry there, or you fly to Mumbai first and cry. I am an emotional man, and I cried – so what? Winning World Cup was my dream too – I had played well in that tournament, second-highest scorer after Sachin, and the way it ended … I just broke down. People said it was crocodile tears. Kya crocodile tears yaar – We are human, emotional. If you see in 2007 World Cup in West Indies also, entire team was crying (after they crashed out of the tournament).”

Still, this is Kambli, and even through the emotionally painful recounting, humour seeps through. He cues up the scene from the hotel room that haunting Kolkata night. His room-partner Venkatapathy Raju and he had just sat down with some beers to recover from the hellish day. “I was crying in the room. ‘Kya ho gaya, ab chod na,’ he said. The phone rang. Continuously for 25 minutes. Fans are calling and crying with me. Raju was sitting with his drink and saying, ‘Kiska phone hai? Tu ro raha hai? Rona bandh kar.’ I said, ‘Yeh log aur rula rahe hai.’ I told the operator put me on DND. But still they managed. Roya, shant hua, then phone-call, wapas rona chalu. Raju had enough.” Laughter.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:18 am

The other television incident came years after retirement, and highlighted how hyphenated his name was with Tendulkar. He was Bharat to Tendulkar’s Ram. As if he couldn’t have an independent existence. That TV show ended up with a lot of negativity. “All I said was he could have helped me more as a brother, a friend. I didn’t mean anything else with that. People misinterpreted it. Even the term self-destruct was in the question – I hadn’t said that. I was just allowed to say yes or no. But it caused a lot of hungama.”

Not everything in memory is tainted, luckily. A scene from childhood with his mother and trips to Gateway of India as a kid, where he would gape at imposing structure of Taj hotel. “My mumma, daaada and my brothers would just look at Taj and say, ‘kitna bada hai’. When I got the Mafatlal Cricketer award, that’s the time I invited my parents and my brothers and we had dinner. And I said, ‘Dad look.’ My mom was very happy. She said, ‘Tula aattavtha?’ I said, ‘Yes.’ When we were young I would say ‘Gateway kitne baar dekha hai, woh dekho Taj’. But while we were having dinner I said, ‘Woh dekho Gateway’.”

The death of his mother, he realises now, was an emotional setback he couldn’t quite recover from. The mind went to Sadanand Vishwanath, another shooting star of Indian cricket, who survived his father’s suicide but couldn’t emotionally handle his mother’s death during his last series as India player. Indian cricket in the 90’s is a strange beast. In the 80’s, it handled the brazenness of Ravi Shastri, who would openly talk about partying, with relative maturity. It even threw up images of Srikkanth smoking in the Lord’s pavilion in celebration. The financial market was liberalised in the 90’s but somehow, the cricket fields turned more conservative. Kambli couldn’t understand it, then or now.

“All I heard from selectors was indiscipline indiscipline indiscipline. What crime did I do? Did I drink and come for any game? Did I miss any training because of it? I made nine comebacks! Never got a consistent run. I wish I could have played overseas tours. I have not played any series in England, South Africa, Australia, or even Zimbabwe. I just played one Test in New Zealand. How will I get experience? They said I am good at spinners – when I got back to back double, was I playing spinners? And suddenly after one flop series against West Indies in ’94, I was termed ODI player. Haven’t so many players bounced back after one bad series?”

***

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:21 am

Fans from that generation would remember that West Indies series, when Kenneth Benjamin, in many ways, ended Kambli’s Test career with bouncers. The famous high back-lift, that was inspired by Chris Broad, would quickly change to a more grounded stance but the recall didn’t come. Kambli found redemption of sorts, in his own mind, when he went to play domestic cricket in South Africa on bouncy tracks.

“Everyone bounced at me. I remember Allan Donald’s first ball at me – a bouncer and he stood there and stared. Next ball was fuller, and I hit a straight drive. I walked up to him, tapping my bat, and said, ‘Long time, no see Donald!’.” Impish schoolboyish laughter fills the air. “I faced Ntini, Donald and the rest at Boland, where I played, and I was so happy that I scored runs in those conditions.” Nostalgia can offer relief from psychological wounds but residues always hover. “I just wish I got more chances in Tests.”

However, with Kambli, it’s not the self-serving accounts that bleed through his memory. Asked for memorable moments from his career, he serves up this hilarious incident from a Sharjah game against Pakistan when Aquib Javed took a hattrick.
Even as Aquib starts his run-up that over, Kambli hit the toilet in the dressing room after telling Kapil Dev. “I was batting at No 5 or 6. Paaji told me, ‘don’t worry, go go. I went to toilet and heard the loud roar. The physio yells out that Ravi has got out. Then Azzu gets out. Then the hat-trick – Sachin too is gone. Arre hat-trick ho gaya, chal nikal!

“I washed my arse! Changed in dressing room, and stumbled out.” The pads weren’t tied up properly; there was no time and the Pakistanis were waiting. “Bh******d kaaliya! Kidhar g***d m***a raha tha tu?!” And I am thinking, “oh my goodness, they are abusing me, and I am padding up there in the middle, adjusting my gear! I had to face that next ball but was soon run out later after misunderstanding with Sanjay Manjrekar.” He hit to midwicket and as soon as Kambli set off, he knew he won’t make it. “I just kept running straight to the toilet! Never mind that abuse, Pakistanis actually liked me. Good memories.”

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:22 am

More happy moments come through. Like how he took up earrings after Kapil. “Kapil Dev was the first Indian to try it…some Sadhu or guru of his recommended it to him. He tried it in Australia but the first day he had it on, he slipped and fell…and said mujhe nahi chahiye…..So then I took over and said ok I’ll try earrings….and scored that 224 with earrings on. Earrings pehen key England ko loot liya!”

Or the first time he was asked to open in Sharjah against Pakistan by the manager Ashok Mankad. “It was fun when he told me to open. Apparently a few teammates shied away, then who’ll open. He came up to me and said, “Tumhi opening karte? Tumhi tambhte, mee saangte.” Imran was just coming and rolling his arm over. Ravi Shastri came up to me and said, “Donald, go after him.” I said, “What?” I then started stepping out and all to Imran. Ravi calls me Donald. Dessie was given my Sunil Gavaskar sir. He said with the headband I used to look like Desmond Haynes. Never found out why Donald.” Shastri explains that it was because of his run-scoring feats that he had named him after Donald Bradman.

Or the time when Kambli and Tendulkar would use Ajit Wadekar to save up money. “Our food and drinks were with him, and he used to sign, and then while checking out he would get shocked.” Or how he became friends with Shane Warne after he hit four sixes in an over. “We would go out drinking.”
***

Luckily, he has a house now in Bandra after 10 years of living on rent. With help from the former chief minister Vilasrao Deshmukh, and his savings that went into interior design, he now at last owns an apartment. “Earlier, money was a big issue for us. All my hard-earned money from whatever cricket I played.”

Not that life is any easier, these days. His wife, he says, is considering a return to modelling world. Kambli is seriously thinking about cricket coaching: “If an IPL team or Ranji team wants me, I am ready for the job. I am willing, and feel I can understand and help today’s youngsters.”
His greatest concern is the well-being of his children. And the fear that his health should hold up so that he can help them grow. It’s been almost a year, he says, since he had his last drink. In 2013, a year after he had done angioplasty for two blocked arteries, he suffered an attack while driving. With help from two cops, who cleared traffic and took him to hospital in time, he survived.

“It was a miracle. Life has been tough. Every day is a challenge to me. I have to think about my family’s future. Every day has been a struggle but she has stood by me. They are totally dependent on me. So my only fear is my health. Nothing else. I want to grow old with my children. I have done acting, singing, dancing, reality shows. Everything. Now, all I want is a good life for my children.”

http://indianexpress.com/article/sports ... i-4944083/

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby raja » Mon Nov 20, 2017 8:39 am

Paddles wrote:Short ball issues ended Kambli's test career in 1995. In ODI's he continued to struggle from 1995 to 2000, barely making runs bar a 100 vs Zimbabwe in India in 1996.

His 50 plus test average overlooks the fact that after 7 games he was rivalling Bradman at about 100, only to plummet in the next 10 tests as New Zealand and the West Indies worked him over, mostly on Indian pitches!

The MRF pace academy isn't just helping Indian fast bowlers, it will help transition and ready players at Ranji level for the next level. In fact, a cynic may say it really has helped Indian batting at international level more than Indian bowling.

Jadeja played less tests over a longer period than Kambli, so he hardly took Kambli's test spot. Jadeja was an ODI star tho. He was clearing the boundary with ease before it was commonplace for specialist middle order batsmen to do so. If he was fixing games, and I make no allegations here, but if he was, my oh my he could have been something more special, because his overall record, for the era, is pretty useful.


Would have liked Kambli to have got more chances. Being "found out" as unable to play the short ball isn't something he couldn't have fixed. He played for Boland much later - I don't know how he did, but he probably faced a fair share of short-pitched bowling. Does anyone have his Boland scores?

As for Jadeja, no doubt he was an excellent limited-overs player. But his Test record is poor - and that he managed to be picked for so many tours over an 8-year career (ended only because of the match-fixing controversy), suggests he was treated favourably by the selectors. But then he was royalty (literally) whereas Kambli grew up in a slum, and came from a low-caste background.

Like bolero says, Kambli contributed to a large extent to his own downfall. Am not defending him - success went to his head. Maybe he needed a mentor, like Tendulkar had Gavaskar & Shastri.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Paddles » Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:22 pm

Jadeja's 15 match fees over 8 years aint exactly being treated that greatly by the selectors in my eyes raja.

He would have earned more in the county system rather than carrying drinks I would think.

In fact, its often far worse for fringe players to be called into squads and not play. Sure there's central contracts lists these days, and I don't know what year India introduced those, but the match fees matter. Mitch McClenehan retired his central contract for this very reason. Worse as a test 12th man, that can be two months or more touring home or away and not earning.

As for whether Kambli could have sorted his short ball issues, I think the fact he was still struggling in the ODI setup (where short stuff is far more regulated than tests) for another 5 year indicates pretty strongly that he didn't. Kambli's not even the most notorable drop from tests for short ball issues, that honour would have to goto Michael Bevan.

Kambli is another Ramprakash, Hick, Sinclair example for players who dominated their local scenes, but just didn't make the grade or boss international cricket. Sinclair started with a couple of double centuries early on as well. They're rare gems for cricket fanatics to discuss.
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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:28 pm


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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:29 pm

Above is the Jadeja assault I am talking about. Will remember him for that.

World cup match and Pakistan.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:31 pm

Kamblis problem as I know what was his severe drinking problem. He could not handle overnight success.

Raja is right, if he wanted he could have gotten over his problems. He was said to be more talented than Tendulkar growing up. He lost his way sadly, drinking to oblivion.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Paddles » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:50 pm

bolero wrote:Kamblis problem as I know what was his severe drinking problem. He could not handle overnight success.

Raja is right, if he wanted he could have gotten over his problems. He was said to be more talented than Tendulkar growing up. He lost his way sadly, drinking to oblivion.


Could but didn't? Are you saying that he didn't even try to? That seems odd to me that a professional sportsman wouldn't try to remedy a known and widely perceived flaw in his game that is preventing him from further international honors and success.

Noone doubted his talents against his Indian contemporary bowlers growing up or even in the Ranji trophy, whether or not more talented than Tendulkar.

In present day it is quite similar to Australia's Khawaja issue presently, but bowlers could still bowl short in India at Kambli, Khawaja just seems to be cotton wooled from Asia for now. Maybe he sorts out his Asian spin problems, may be he doesn't. I bet he's trying to master spin bowling though.
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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:59 pm

He had a compulsive drinking problem. Lost it completely.

If a poor man gets a ton of wealth one day, he suddenly loses his senses. Same thing happened to him.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:01 pm

In a TV interview later, he blamed his childhood friend Tendulkar for not helping when he was down.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Paddles » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:04 pm

bolero wrote:He had a compulsive drinking problem. Lost it completely.

If a poor man gets a ton of wealth one day, he suddenly loses his senses. Same thing happened to him.


Hmm. Well I guess anyone could try and do what Steve Waugh learned to do given the simplicity of his remedying his batting approach to short bowling. But even then so many don't succeed in that choice. That's mind over matter to avoid self preservation when the ball's trajectory is misjudged early.
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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Paddles » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:05 pm

bolero wrote:In a TV interview later, he blamed his childhood friend Tendulkar for not helping when he was down.


Yeah I've read the drama between these two. Good soap opera stuff :D

End of the day, Kambli will remain famous in the cricketing world because of a school boy partnership with Tendulkar. But not everyone wants to be famous and in the shadow.
Law 31.6 - benefit of the doubt for an dismissal appeal goes to the batsman
A third umpire call for a run out or stumping is a referral, not a review.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:30 pm

Paddles wrote:
bolero wrote:He had a compulsive drinking problem. Lost it completely.

If a poor man gets a ton of wealth one day, he suddenly loses his senses. Same thing happened to him.


Hmm. Well I guess anyone could try and do what Steve Waugh learned to do given the simplicity of his remedying his batting approach to short bowling. But even then so many don't succeed in that choice. That's mind over matter to avoid self preservation when the ball's trajectory is misjudged early.


Yeah. But for that, the mind has to be in the right place.

He turned into a drunkard.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:35 pm

Paddles wrote:
bolero wrote:In a TV interview later, he blamed his childhood friend Tendulkar for not helping when he was down.


Yeah I've read the drama between these two. Good soap opera stuff :D

End of the day, Kambli will remain famous in the cricketing world because of a school boy partnership with Tendulkar. But not everyone wants to be famous and in the shadow.


An angry Tendulkar did not invite Kambli for his farewell match.

Kambli made all kinds of accusations against Sachin in his interview, that he didn't help him financially also.

Now who will give money to a drunk?

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:40 pm

But apparently they have patched up.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:59 pm


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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Yorkshire » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:14 am

bolero wrote:
Paddles wrote:
Hmm. Well I guess anyone could try and do what Steve Waugh learned to do given the simplicity of his remedying his batting approach to short bowling. But even then so many don't succeed in that choice. That's mind over matter to avoid self preservation when the ball's trajectory is misjudged early.


Yeah. But for that, the mind has to be in the right place.

He turned into a drunkard.


I do not care much of his personal Life but Vinod was such a hero ( 1993) in 5 successive
Test innings he hits

224
220
124
4
120

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby Yorkshire » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:20 am

bolero wrote:
Paddles wrote:
Hmm. Well I guess anyone could try and do what Steve Waugh learned to do given the simplicity of his remedying his batting approach to short bowling. But even then so many don't succeed in that choice. That's mind over matter to avoid self preservation when the ball's trajectory is misjudged early.


Yeah. But for that, the mind has to be in the right place.

He turned into a drunkard.


Vishy too become drunkard after 1982-83 test series in Pakistan, BCCI dropped him soon after Pakistan tour were he was completely failure as batsman vs IMRAN &company.

Part of life for many cricketer, Failure Can makes you weak.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:50 am

Yorkshire wrote:
bolero wrote:
Yeah. But for that, the mind has to be in the right place.

He turned into a drunkard.


I do not care much of his personal Life but Vinod was such a hero ( 1993) in 5 successive
Test innings he hits

224
220
124
4
120


I agree dear. Just saying he lost his way. Sometimes overnight success can be detrimental.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:13 am

Yorkshire wrote:
bolero wrote:
Yeah. But for that, the mind has to be in the right place.

He turned into a drunkard.


Vishy too become drunkard after 1982-83 test series in Pakistan, BCCI dropped him soon after Pakistan tour were he was completely failure as batsman vs IMRAN &company.

Part of life for many cricketer, Failure Can makes you weak.


Cant compare Vishy and Kambli. Vishy was from a middle class family, Kambli from a very poor family. Kambli always felt he was treated badly because of his background, he led a flamboyant lifestyle too. He attended late night parties and was ticked off by the team management for not coming to time for practice.

His fall was his doing. He didnt have a mentor.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:32 am

Vinod Kambli’s Unfulfilled Career Is A Reminder That We Should Never Let Success Get To Our Head

Everyone's heard the story...
Two 13-year-olds going ballistic with their bats, smashing the opposition to a pulp, on their way to a then world-record 664-run unbeaten partnership. That knock in the Harris Shield Trophy is what first brought Sachin Tendulkar and Vinod Kambli into the limelight. Everyone's heard that story.
But what many people haven't heard is that Kambli (349 runs) had outscored Sachin (326) that day. And that after they declared and the opponents came out to bat, Kambli had picked up 6 for 37 with the ball.

He hit a six off his very first ball in Ranji cricket. He was the fastest Indian to 1000 Test runs, needing only 14 matches to get there. He hit four hundreds in his first 7 Tests, turning two of them into double centuries.
But by 23, Vinod Ganpat Kambli had played the last of his 17 Tests for India. So what happened? Where did it all go wrong?

Depending on whom you choose to believe, there are two versions as to what went wrong.

Kambli points fingers at his captain, his teammates, his selectors and the cricket board. He believes that politics and favouritism are to blame for the death of his international career.

When all else failed, he even took to blaming Sachin for his unfulfilled career. He says 'his friend' never stood by him or lent him a helping hand when the going got tough.

And if you were to ask anyone else, they'll tell you that Kambli was his own worst enemy.

All the fame and adulation apparently got to his head. Tales abound of alcohol and substance abuse. Some people claim that once the runs started flowing, Kambli got distracted by a flashy lifestyle, gold jewellery and women.

There were also the weaknesses in his game which he refused to address. Take the short ball, for instance. Kambli struggled against short-pitched deliveries but he never worked on it. And at the international stage, there's no hiding place. Once he got found out, rivals attacked him in his weak zones. And he paid the price.

This is not a dissection of Kambli's career. That career is dead and buried.

But, just for a moment, forget how you feel about Kambli and imagine him and Sachin, batting together, at their ruthless best. What a deadly opening partnership that would've been. A right handed-left handed tag team that would've clobbered the living daylights out of opposition bowlers.
Just to refresh your memory, how about a video of Kambli tearing Shane Warne a new one. Shane Effing Warne, no less. And Kambli ripped him to bits. Just watch it already:

But as they say, talent can only take you so far. You need temperament to stay at the top. Sachin was always about getting better, scoring more, winning bigger. Kambli, on the other hand, got carried away.

When Rahul Dravid came into the ODI set-up, the critics weren't sure. His defensive approach wasn't suited for the limited-overs game, they said. After all, the 50-over format was tailor-made for Kambli's slam-bang style. But the way the two careers panned out says a lot about how there is more to success than talent and flamboyance.

It is also about application, resilience, dedication and hard work. All the things that Dravid oozed, all the things that Kambli lacked.

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Re: Vinod Kambli

Postby bolero » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:33 am

"Once you go beyond a certain stage, talent is the most useless thing to possess," said Harsha Bhogle, talking about Kambli to a gathering at IIM Ahmedabad.

"Some extremely talented young cricketers struggle the moment they face a roadblock because they don't know what to do. Because they never had to struggle to succeed. They always used their talent to succeed."

He recalled how Kambli was hapless when Courtney Walsh hurled bouncers at him in 1994. "He didn't know what to do because talent had solved all his problems until that point," continued Bhogle.

Kambli didn't recover from that and never played for India in Tests ever again. He made 9 comebacks to the ODI side but indiscipline and a lack of application cost him his career.

"After a point, work ethic counts for far more than talent," Bhogle added, citing Tendulkar as a prime example. "Attitude, work ethic and his passion are the reason Tendulkar hit (then) 70 centuries."

Of course, Tendulkar went on to score 30 more tons. Kambli sadly missed the plot completely.

His career will always be a painful story of what might have been. It also serves as a stinging reminder that you should not get carried away by your laurels.

If you ever feel you're getting too ahead of yourself or that distractions are getting in the way of your passion, just pause for a second and remember Vinod Ganpat Kambli.

https://www.scoopwhoop.com/Vinod-Kambli/#.xh3h800wb