Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

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Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:01 am

January 1 down the years


Corey Anderson blasts a hundred from 36 balls


2014
The day a 17-year-old record was broken. It was a rude beginning to the new year for West Indies' bowlers as New Zealand's Corey Anderson ransacked a century off just 36 balls in a shortened ODI in Queenstown. He blasted 14 sixes, two behind Rohit Sharma's world record 16, on his way to eclipsing the record set by a 16-year-old Shahid Afridi in 1996. Anderson made best use of the short boundaries and raced to his fifty in 20 balls. He stood at 95 at the start of the 18th over. The first ball from Nikita Miller was short and Anderson duly pulled a six over long-on. Anderson remained the record-holder for only a year, though. In Johannesburg in January 2015, AB de Villiers broke it with a 31-ball hundred, also against West Indies.


1908
One of the greatest of all Test careers began. The wide open spaces of the MCG held no terrors for Jack Hobbs, who scored 83 in his first Test knock. He went on to become the first batsman to score 5000 Test runs, and his other feats would take forever to list. Try virtually any page in the first-class batting section of the Wisden Almanack.


1902
Birth of the greatest one-eyed cricketer of Norwegian descent to play in a Test. Eiulf Peter "Buster" Nupen was regarded as one of the best bowlers ever seen on South African matting, and he might have had better Test figures than 50 wickets at 35.76 if he'd had a full complement of eyes. He lost one as a young man while trying to knock two hammers together. Probably better not to ask.


1910
The last of the top underarm lob bowlers made a successful start to his only Test series. A weak England team, stuffed with amateurs, couldn't avoid defeat in Johannesburg, but a first-innings haul of 6 for 43 by one of those unpaid workers, George Hayward Thomas Simpson-Hayward (better known as George Simpson-Hayward), made it a close-run thing.


1923
Another memorable debut, this time in Cape Town, where George Macaulay dismissed George Hearne with his first ball in Test cricket. Macaulay later made the winning hit in England's very narrow victory.


1967
The late 1960s was the golden age of stadium riots on the subcontinent. One of them forced the cancellation of today's play between India and West Indies in Calcutta. Clashes with police, stands set alight: nothing unusual for the time. It didn't affect the result, though - West Indies thumped India by an innings, with seven wickets each for Messrs Sobers and Gibbs.


1995
Batting for Delhi against Himachal Pradesh in Delhi, Ravi Sehgal made 216, his maiden first-class hundred, and helped Raman Lamba (312) put on 464, a first-wicket record for any first-class match in India. The match was distinctly one-sided: Himachal Pradesh were dismissed for 205 and 122 and lost by an innings and 310 runs.


1925
That greedy run-accumulator Bill Ponsford collected another 128 of them against England in Melbourne to become the first batsman to score a hundred in each of his first two Tests.


1905
Despite an undistinguished Test career (a single appearance at The Oval in 1934), Hans Ebeling, who was born today, played a major part in a big Test occasion. He was the prime mover behind the Centenary Test in Melbourne in 1976-77.


1944
Birth of West Indian opener Charlie Davis, whose last Test hundred was his biggest: 183 against New Zealand in Bridgetown in 1971-72, when he put on 254 with Garry Sobers. He'd been almost impossible to dismiss in the 1970-71 series against India (again at home), averaging 132.25.


1928
Genuinely useful but injury-prone seamer Khan Mohammad was born. Often Fazal Mahmood's foil in Tests for Pakistan, the two were just about the only bowlers left standing when Garry Sobers made his world record 365 not out in Kingston in 1957-58. Khan Mohammad's figures of 0 for 259 are the worst in any Test innings by a wicketless bowler - but his 54 Test wickets cost only 23.92 each and he had figures of 5 for 61 (including Len Hutton for a duck) at Lord's in 1954 and 6 for 21 against New Zealand in Dacca in 1955-56.


1984
The first Bangladesh bowler to take a hat-trick, Alok Kapali, was born today. That feat came in Peshawar in 2003 - when he helped Bangladesh gain their maiden first-innings lead. Kapali scored his maiden ODI hundred in 2008, against India in the Asia Cup in Karachi, but his international career was put on hold when he joined the ICL in 2008. However, he quit after a season and made himself available for selection again.


1990
Another Bangladeshi born on New Year's Day. Rubel Hossain made memorable debuts in ODIs and Tests - in a rare one-day win for his side, over Sri Lanka in Mirpur in 2009, and in their historic Test series win in West Indies later that year. He sunk New Zealand in an ODI in Mirpur in 2013 with 6 for 26. He was first spotted at a pace-hunt programme, and went the Under-19 route before establishing himself in the national side.


1980
And another. Bangladesh fast bowler Mushfiqur Rahman, whose ten-Test, 28-ODI career progressed much like his team's faltering steps in international cricket was also born today. After going wicketless in his first two Tests, in Zimbabwe in 2001, Rahman was dropped for two years. His comeback in 2003-04 didn't grab headlines either; his career-best figures were 4 for 65 against West Indies in a Test in St Lucia in 2004, and though he had a few scores in the 40s in Tests and ODIs, he never got a fifty in either format.



Other birthdays
1875 Frank Druce (England)
1909 Dattaram Hindlekar (India)
1949 Bev Wilson (Australia)
1963 Glenn Trimble (Australia)
1964 Nasir Ahmed (Bangladesh)
1968 Ilyas Gul (Hong Kong)
1970 Robin Singh Jr (India)
1975 Niamur Rashid (Bangladesh)
1978 Uzma Gondal (Pakistan)
1981 Asma Farzand (Pakistan)
1986 Elias Sunny (Bangladesh)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
Last edited by Misty on Sat May 13, 2017 4:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:07 am

Boycaught30,
I will be away from this section from Friday/sat/sun/mon =4 days = 8 matches IPL coming up so posted couple of January down the lane memories for you and raja
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:15 am

January 2 down the years


Fred "Demon" Spofforth finished with 13 wickets in the Melbourne Test


1879
It was only fitting that Fred Spofforth should take the first hat-trick in Test cricket, against England in Melbourne: he was the greatest bowler of his age, a demon in the eyes of Englishmen everywhere. The second victim in his hat-trick was Francis Alexander MacKinnon, the 35th MacKinnon of MacKinnon, who was facing his first ball in international cricket. A lot of scorers were grateful that this was his only Test.


1992
An equally great Australian bowler made an inauspicious Test debut. Only one of Shane Warne's 700-plus Test wickets was taken in this game, against India in Sydney, and it cost him 150 runs - Ravi Shastri was his victim, but not before he hit 206. Warne didn't get any at all in the next Test, in Adelaide, but it was understandable: before this series he'd played in only seven first-class matches. Still, he turned out to be quite useful.



1978
By scoring 182 in the second innings of the third Test against West Indies in Calcutta, Sunil Gavaskar added to his list of records: he became the first batsman to hit a century in each innings of a Test match three times. He had made a mere 107 in the first innings.



2013
New Zealand were bowled out for 45, their third-lowest total, in Cape Town. Their innings lasted less than 20 overs. They had just memorably beaten Sri Lanka away, but hardly had the euphoria evaporated, and the drama over Ross Taylor's sacking as captain receded from the headlines, that they were rolled over for an innings and 27 runs. Doug Bracewell became Dale Steyn's 300th Test victim. New Zealand lost by an innings in the next Test in Port Elizabeth as well.


1984
When you make your maiden first-class hundred at the age of 16, as Daryll Cullinan did today, for Border against Natal B in East London, you're expected to go on and become a star. Although he made an unbeaten 275 in Auckland in 1998-99, then a record for South Africa in Tests, his frailty against Shane Warne and his chatty chums held Cullinan's reputation in check. He averaged only 12.75 against Australia, compared to 48 against everybody else.


1985
Bob Holland took his best Test figures and Kepler Wessels scored his fourth hundred for Australia in a dead rubber in the final Test at the SCG as they beat West Indies by an innings and 55 runs. However West Indies won the series 3-1. Wessels' 173 took Australia to 471 and then legspinner Holland took 6 for 54 to enforce the follow-on. He took four more in the second to finish with 10 for 144. This was West Indies' first defeat since they lost in Melbourne 27 Tests earlier, in the 1981-82 series, and their first by an innings since 1968-69.


1960
Raman Lamba, who was born today, joined a sad, select club that includes England men Andy Ducat and Wilf Slack when he died at the crease in Dhaka in 1998 after taking a fatal blow to the head while fielding at short leg. A good enough opening batsman to play four Tests for India, Lamba was also the man chased all the way to third man by a maniacal, stump-wielding Rashid Patel in an infamous incident in 1990. Lamba was by no means blameless - he had been taunting Patel, and the ensuing fencing match got Lamba a ten-month ban and Patel 14 months. Lamba had an Irish wife, and played for Ireland against Sussex in the NatWest Trophy in 1990.


2003
Herschelle Gibbs (228) and Graeme Smith (151) destroyed Pakistan's demoralised bowling with an opening stand of 368, at the time South Africa's best for any wicket, on the first day of the Newlands Test. Gibbs' double-hundred is the fastest by a South African and he also became the sixth from his country to reach 3000 Test runs during his innings. South Africa went on to win by an innings and 142 runs. It was the start of a productive year for Smith, who was made captain in March and went on to score consecutive double-centuries in England in July.


1970
Few people take a hat-trick in their last international appearance. But the New South Wales seamer Anthony Stuart, who was born today, did. He took 5 for 26 in his third one-day appearance, against Pakistan in Melbourne in 1996-97, including Ijaz Ahmed, Mohammad Wasim and Moin Khan with successive deliveries. He had already dismissed Aamer Sohail and Zahoor Elahi, but he suffered an ankle injury and Australia never picked him again.


1964
One of the early pillars of Sri Lanka's bowling was born. Rumesh Ratnayake's brisk pace brought him 73 Test wickets from 1982-83 (when he was only 19) to 1991-92, including 5 for 69 at Lord's in 1991 and 20 wickets at 22.95 against India in 1985-86, the first series Sri Lanka ever won. Mind you, he needed to brush up on his image as a demon fast bowler: after breaking John Wright's nose with a bouncer in a Test in Wellington in 1982-83, he fainted at the sight of blood.


1973
A tall and forceful batsman, John Benaud couldn't hope to match his brother Richie's profile, but he averaged 44.60 in his three Tests for Australia, largely thanks to the 142 he made today (93 before lunch) against Pakistan in Melbourne - after being told that he wouldn't be playing in the next Test.


1886
Dependable South African opening batsman Jack "Billy" Zulch was born. Both of his Test hundreds were made in Australia in 1910-11 (his only series abroad), but he was probably better known for the way he was dismissed in Johannesburg in 1921-22. The ball, sent down by Australia's pantherine opening bowler Ted McDonald, was so fast it broke his bat, a sliver of the blade hitting the stumps.


Other birthdays
1875 Bill Bradley (England)
1893 Johnny Moyes (Australia)
1907 Laurie Fishlock (England)
1931 Robin Marlar (England)
1953 David Graveney (England)
1959 Kirti Azad (India)
1987 Abdul Rehman (United Arab Emirates)
1971 Aamer Nazir (Pakistan)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:20 am

Boycaught
Suggestion

We need to start this thread from January 1st.
Can you update and deletes April 24/25/26 or so, that way we can going alphabetically plus day by day
Its upto you.Anyway its fun

Above I posted
January 1st
January 2nd
So and so ......
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:29 am

January 3 down the years



Everton Weekes (right) made 141, 128, 194, 162 and 101 back to


1949
That devastating and prolific batsman Everton Weekes set a world record that looks likely to last a while longer. His 101 in Calcutta completed a sequence of scoring a century in each of five consecutive Test innings. He might have set a target that would really have had 'em chasing if he hadn't been run out for 90 in his next Test innings, in Madras. Weekes' run began with 141 against England in Kingston in March 1948 and continued with 128 in Delhi, 194 in Bombay and then 162 in the first innings in Calcutta. In 1955, Weekes also scored three back-to-back hundreds against New Zealand.


1886
If we say one of cricket's great characters was born, it might suggest Arthur Mailey was better known for his whims and wit than his legbreaks. But he's still the only bowler to take nine wickets in a Test innings for Australia, his 9 for 121 against England in Melbourne helping Australia to win the series 5-0. Happy to buy his wickets when necessary ("Medium-pacers can keep the score down. I'm here to take wickets"), he was amused to finish with 99 in Tests, and his 10 for 66 in an innings against Gloucestershire at Cheltenham in 1921 gave him the perfect title for his autobiography: Ten For 66 And All That.


2016
Ben Stokes and Jonny Bairstow's 399-run stand in Cape Town set a new record for the sixth wicket in Tests - surpassing Kane Williamson and BJ Watling's 365 from the year before - and the second-highest overall for England. Stokes' double-hundred was the second fastest of all time, of which 130 came on the morning of day two, breaking an 81-year-old record for most runs by a batsman in the first session of a day in Tests. The drawn match was a run fest. Hashim Amla also scored a double-century (and then stepped down as South Africa's Test captain), and wicketkeeper Temba Bavuma became the country's first black African batsman to score a Test hundred.


2003
A dream day for Steve Waugh at his home ground in Sydney. Playing his last Ashes Test, Waugh clattered Richard Dawson through cover to bring up his hundred off the final ball of the day. It was an uncharacteristically quick knock too, taking just 130 balls. Earlier that day, Waugh had reached another milestone, becoming only the third player - after Sunil Gavaskar and Allan Border - to score 10,000 runs in Test cricket.


1952
Tension all around as Australia's last two batsmen, tailenders Doug Ring and Bill Johnston, put on 38 to win the Melbourne Test. Instead of winning their second successive Test to level the series, West Indies lost it after going 3-1 down.


1929
The first of too many in English eyes. Here in Melbourne, Don Bradman made his maiden Test century, one of 19 against England, a record for any batsman against any one country.


1932
Australia's only win in the Bodyline series was in Melbourne. Don Bradman returned to the side for the second Test, after illness kept him out of the first, and was bowled first ball by Bill Bowes. However England captain Douglas Jardine had made the mistake of including Bowes in place of spinner Hedley Verity, anticipating a fast track. The dead pitch instead favoured the Australian spinners - Bill O'Reilly took a match haul of 10 for 129 - and Bradman scored an unbeaten century in the second innings. Australia won by 111 runs.


1948
Two more centuries for Bradman in Melbourne, in both innings - the only time in his career - in Australia's 233-run win against India. Vinoo Mankad scored the only century by India and took 4 for 135 in the first innings. Indian wicketkeeper Khokhan Singh made his debut in the Test.


1978
Another Australia-India match in Melbourne, but one that India won to record their first success in the country. On the fourth day Bhagwath Chandrasekhar took 6 for 52 for the second time in the match to bring Australia down to their knees at 123 for 8, needing 387 to win. Bishan Bedi took the final two on the fifth day and India won by 222 runs. Sunil Gavaskar scored the only century in the low-scoring game.


1985
Mohammad Azharuddin announced his arrival with a century on debut in an otherwise tedious draw with England in Calcutta. The hosts reached 164 for 4 on day one and added only ten more on day two, more or less lost to smog and rain. Azhar batted soundly during his 110 but his partnership with Ravi Shastri dragged on painfully till the third day, for they scored at under two an over. Shastri, who batted on all five days of the match, took an hour longer for his second fifty than for his first, seven hours in all, and spent an hour in the 90s.


1958
Unorthodox slow left-armer Lindsay Kline, who featured in another famous last-wicket stand against West Indies, in Adelaide in 1960-61, did his day job today in Cape Town, taking a hat-trick to wrap up Australia's innings win over South Africa.


1939
Queensland wicketkeeper Don Tallon, one of the greatest ever produced by Australia, made his 12th dismissal of the match against New South Wales in Sydney. This equalled Ted Pooley's total for Surrey against Sussex at The Oval way back in 1868, and remained a joint world record until Wayne James made 13 dismissals for Matabeleland against Mashonaland in Bulawayo in 1995-96.


1902
Test centuries by No. 10 batsmen don't grow on trees, and only two have been scored by a No. 10 making his debut. Held back while a rain-affected pitch lost its venom, Reggie Duff - who usually opened - hit 104 to help Australia beat England in Melbourne. He and fellow debutant Warwick Armstrong made Test cricket's first century partnership for the last wicket. The next day Hugh Trumble finished off their second innings with the first of his two Test hat-tricks and Australia won by 229 runs.


1966
Birth of Indian seamer Chetan Sharma, best remembered for the victorious six Javed Miandad hit off him from the last ball of the 1986 Sharjah final. Two months later, Sharma took his only ten-wicket haul in Tests, against England at Edgbaston. When Sharma took the first World Cup hat-trick (all bowled) against New Zealand in Nagpur in 1987-88, joy wasn't altogether unconfined: there had been murmurs about his bowling action, especially when he sent down the bouncer. Another action raised some eyebrows in Kanpur in 1989-90: a startling one-day hundred against England.


1997
Talking of one-day international hat-tricks... Eddo Brandes, chicken farmer and seamer rolled into one, took 5 for 28, including three in three balls, against England in Harare as Zimbabwe sealed the series 3-0.


1963
A chequered career for Aamer Malik, who was born today. He is one of only three men to score a century in both innings of his first-class debut (Arthur Morris and Nari Contractor are the others). Malik made a seven-hour unbeaten 98 in his second Test, made back-to-back hundreds against India in 1989-90, effected a Test stumping as stand-in keeper, took one Test wicket (Australia's Peter Taylor - batting at No. 2), and was recalled after a four-year absence to face Australia in 1994-95. He helped save the second Test with a crucial second-innings 65... and was dropped, this time for good.


1989
Birth of England's first T20I centurion. Alex Hales had made 99 in his fifth T20, but had to wait two years before he could go past 100, during the 2014 World T20. He made his one-day debut that year and scored his maiden century in the format during England's memorable series win against Pakistan in the UAE in 2015. England's Test series defeat on that tour prompted the selectors to try out Hales as Alastair Cook's opening partner in the Tests in South Africa. He scored five fifties in 11 Tests between December 2015 and August 2016 before being dropped. But Hales was far more prolific in ODIs in that period, making five scores of 50-plus back to back and then setting the record for the highest score by an England batsman - 171, against Pakistan at Trent Bridge.


Other birthdays
1932 Jaswick Taylor (West Indies)
1943 Helen Lee (Australia
1979 Brent Arnel (New Zealand)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.



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4/5/6
Tomorrow
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby louie_db9 » Thu Apr 27, 2017 9:19 am

Why would you go from present day back to January 1st?

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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Thu Apr 27, 2017 3:40 pm

January 4 down the years

The first bowler to be called for throwing

Ernie Jones: threw a ball through the most famous beard in cricket


1898
Big in frame and heart, Australian fast bowler Ernie Jones is famous for two things. Sending a bouncer through WG Grace's beard ("Sorry, Doc, she slipped") - and becoming the first bowler to be called for throwing in a Test, which happened today against England in Melbourne. "Jonah", who was no-balled by umpire Jim Phillips, the scourge of all chuckers, took 64 Test wickets, some of them possibly kosher.

1937
The start of Don Bradman's 270 against England in the third Test, in Melbourne. Trailing 2-0 after defeats in Brisbane and Sydney, Australia were facing defeat when Bradman, struggling with flu, his reputation as a batsman and captain on the line, came in for the second innings. He faced Bill Voce and Gubby Allen, frighteningly fast on a rain-affected pitch that also helped the master spinner Hedley Verity. Careful at first, increasing the tempo as he went on, Bradman hit his highest score against England at home, sharing a record stand of 346 with Jack Fingleton, and turning the match and the series. Australia remain the only side to come back to win from two-down in a five-match series.

1975
A rare instance of a captain dropping himself. A shell-shocked Mike Denness left himself out of the England side for the fourth Test against Australia in Sydney after scoring 65 runs in six innings. The ploy didn't work as England lost the match by 171 runs and with it the Ashes. Denness' replacement as captain, John Edrich, was struck by Dennis Lillee with the first ball he received and was taken to hospital with a broken rib. Denness returned with a half-century in the fifth Test and a hundred in the final game of the series.

2002
Muttiah Muralitharan came agonisingly close to the best innings figures in all Test cricket. By the first evening in Kandy against Zimbabwe, he had taken 9 for 51 from 39 overs. The next morning Travis Friend offered a regulation bat-pad catch off Murali's first ball, only for Russel Arnold to drop it; then an lbw appeal was turned down. At the other end Chaminda Vaas bowled wide of off stump to Henry Olonga but could not stop him nicking one - which Kumar Sangakkara could not bring himself to drop. Murali took four in the second innings and Sri Lanka won by an innings and 94 runs.

1906
England on the receiving end again. It was only by one wicket, but that was enough to give South Africa their first ever Test victory. They needed a last-wicket stand of 48 between Percy Sherwell, their captain, wicketkeeper and No. 11, and AW "Dave" Nourse, to beat a scandalously weak England team. South Africa won the next two Tests as well, and took the series 4-1.

1936
Clarrie Grimmett's 190th Test wicket, for Australia v South Africa in Cape Town on this day, overtook the total reached by the great Sydney Barnes, also in South Africa, in 1913-14.

2016
Chris Gayle found himself at the centre of an ugly storm of his own making when he made sexist remarks to a pitch-side reporter on camera during the BBL. Interviewed by Channel Ten's Mel McLaughlin after his dismissal in a game for Melbourne Renegades, Gayle said, "I wanted to come and have an interview with you as well. That's the reason why I'm here, just to see your eyes for the first time. It's nice so… Hopefully we can win this game and have a drink after. Don't blush, baby." Gayle was fined A$10,000 by Renegades for his remarks. He had previous in this area, having got off scot-free after a similar incident in the Caribbean Premier League in 2014, when, asked by a female reporter about the surface his team would be playing on in the next game, he replied: "Well, I haven't touched yours yet so I don't know how it feels."

Other birthdays
1937 Surendranath (India)
1971 Richard Chee Quee (Australia)
1979 John Blain (Scotland)
1979 Gulam Bodi (South Africa)
1979 Chamila Gamage (Sri Lanka)
1980 Justin Ontong (South Africa)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Thu Apr 27, 2017 3:55 pm

January 5 down the years
Birth of a one-eyed Tiger

Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi makes his entrance

Tiger Pataudi played 46 Tests for India.


1941
Birth of Mansur Ali Khan, aka the Nawab of Pataudi junior. The Nawab of Pataudi senior had scored a Test century for England, but his son "Tiger" played exclusively for India, 40 times as captain (in 46 Tests), scoring 2793 runs and six centuries. Not bad for someone whose Test career didn't begin until a car crash had cost him the sight in one eye. Pataudi Jr was credited with the strategy that saw India play a spin-heavy attack for much of the 1970s, and it was under him that they won their first Test overseas, against New Zealand in 1968. Pataudi, arguably India's finest captain, first took charge in 1962, at 21, becoming the youngest captain in Tests, a record that stood for over 40 years. He retired in 1975, and served as a match referee between 1993 and 1996. He died of a lung infection in 2011.

2014
The day Australia completed their second whitewash of England in seven years - and only their third ever. They did it in style, wiping the floor with the old enemy to the tune of 281 runs on day three of the fifth Test, in Sydney. It brought to a close a one-sided series that gave the lie to the 3-0 scoreline in England's favour the previous summer. Mitchell Johnson was head and shoulders a deserving Man of the Series for his 37 wickets at an eye-popping 13.97 each. In Sydney, as at points earlier in the tour, England flattered to deceive when they had Australia on the mat at 97 for 5 in the first innings, only for Steve Smith to come to the rescue with his second century of the series. In the fourth Test, in Melbourne, Chris Rogers, another of Australia's finds of the series, swung the deal with a fifty and a hundred, and Nathan Lyon chipped in with five wickets in England's second innings. The lone bright spot in the visitors' ill-starred campaign (which featured the retirement of Graeme Swann after the series was lost 3-0 in Perth) was debutant allrounder Ben Stokes, who took 15 wickets and made 279 runs in the four matches he played.

1993
A maiden, and epic, Test century for Brian Lara turned into a crucial and commanding one, the first of nine against Australia. Wisden described his 277 in Sydney as an innings of "breathtaking quality" which turned a series that was slipping from West Indies. Richie Richardson, who scored a century of his own, later said: "I can hardly remember my hundred. It was difficult playing and being a spectator at the same time." At the close on the third day Lara had made 124.

2016
The day a Mumbai schoolboy scored over 1000 runs, in one innings. Pranav Dhanawade, 15, smashed an unbeaten 1009 not out off 327 deliveries to notch up the highest individual score in minor cricket, breaking a 117-year-old record, going past Albert Collins' 628 not out, scored in 1899. Representing Smt KC Gandhi School, Dhanwade hit 129 fours and 59 sixes against Arya Gurukul. He ended the opening day of the two-day game on 652 and went past 1000 in the second session on the final day before his team declared their innings at 1465 for 3.


2007
Australia drubbed England 5-0 in the Ashes - only the second whitewash in the bilateral contest - with a win in the final Test in Sydney. It was a fitting way to get over the loss in 2005, and also a fitting farewell for Glenn McGrath, Shane Warne and Justin Langer - the Test careers of all three came to a close with the series.

1971
In the first ever one-day international, in Melbourne, John Edrich was made Man of the Match for his top score of 82, but England's bowlers were too expensive to stop Australia winning by five wickets. The match was played only because the third Test had been washed out. To the astonishment of the Australian board, 46,000 turned up - it was then they realised that this one-day malarkey might be a good, money-spinning idea.

1904
England won by 185 runs in Melbourne thanks to the slow left-arm of Wilfred Rhodes, who took 7 for 56 and 8 for 68. Australia's totals would have been much lower if eight catches hadn't been dropped off Rhodes' bowling.

1928
One of Pakistan's early stalwarts was born. Wicketkeeper, batsman and captain, Imtiaz Ahmed played in 41 Tests from 1952-53 to 1962, making 93 dismissals, including seven catches, all off Fazal Mahmood, in Pakistan's first Test win against England, at The Oval in 1954. The highest of his three Test centuries was 209, at No. 8, against New Zealand in Lahore in 1955-56.

1937
You can't keep Don Bradman off these pages. Here at MCG he shared another huge stand against England, adding 346 with Jack Fingleton, then the highest stand for the sixth wicket.

1962
Birth of Brendon Kuruppu, who set two Test records while making his debut for Sri Lanka, against New Zealand at the Colombo Cricket Club. His 201 was at the time the highest not-out score by a batsman playing in his first Test, let alone his first Test innings - and it was the slowest Test double-ton of all time until Gary Kirsten's 275 in 1999-2000. Kuruppu's innings lasted 777 minutes, which must be some kind of devil's number as it is three minutes short of 13 hours. He kept wicket too, so he had his pads on for the entire match.

1984
In his final Test innings, against Pakistan in Sydney, Greg Chappell signed off a great career with an innings of 182. Against West Indies eight years earlier, he'd made the same score on the same ground on the same day.

1941
Bob Cunis, an honest seamer and lower-order scrapper, played 20 Tests for New Zealand between 1964 and 1972 with limited success. He made only one fifty and took only one five-for, the latter against England in Auckland in 1970-71, when he bowled Alan Knott four runs short of a second hundred in the match. Cunis went on to coach New Zealand for a time, and in his playing days was also a very handy rugby three-quarter.

1996
After being called for throwing in a Test match (see December 26), Muttiah Muralitharan had to suffer the same humiliation in a one-day international, against West Indies in Brisbane.

2017
South Africa marched to an unassailable 2-0 series lead, crushing Sri Lanka by 282 runs in the New Year Test at Newlands. Kagiso Rabada was the standout performer, with match figures of 10 for 92, while Vernon Philander kept his record at the venue intact with 7 for 75, taking his ground figures to 57 wickets at 18.73. The platform had been laid by Dean Elgar's solid top-order hundred in the first innings. Sri Lanka's batsmen could not follow his lead, and looked out of their depth in seamer-friendly conditions.

Other birthdays
1920 Mohammad Aslam (Pakistan)
1948 Parthasarthi Sharma (India)
1958 Ezra Moseley (West Indies)
1977 Jamaluddin Ahmed (Bangladesh)
1977 Garnett Kruger South Africa


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Thu Apr 27, 2017 11:54 pm

January 6 down the years


2008
A record-equalling 16th straight Test win for Australia was overshadowed by the row that erupted over the allegation that Harbhajan Singh had racially abused Andrew Symonds during the Sydney Test. Match referee Mike Procter suspended Harbhajan for three Tests but it was reduced to a 50% match-fee fine on appeal, after threats to boycott the tour emerged from the Indian camp. India were also unhappy with several umpiring decisions in the Test: first Symonds, who later admitted to edging a ball when on 30, was not given out by Steve Bucknor, and went on to make an unbeaten 162; Michael Clarke refused to walk when caught at second slip and later claimed a disputed catch off Sourav Ganguly, which umpire Mark Benson accepted as legitimate based on a pre-series agreement between the captains that the fielder's word would be taken. In the end, on the BCCI's insistence, the ICC removed Bucknor from the third Test in Perth.


1959
India's greatest allrounder was born. Kapil Dev is the only player to score 4000 runs and take 400 wickets in Test cricket. His 5248 runs included eight centuries, his 434 wickets were a world record at the time, and he captained India when they won the 1983 World Cup. If he hadn't been dropped for one Test against England in 1984-85 (a disciplinary measure after an attacking stroke at the wrong time), his Test career would have consisted of 132 consecutive matches.


2004
Steve Waugh played his final Test, at his home ground, the SCG. India and Sachin Tendulkar nearly stole his thunder before he came out in the fourth innings to score 80 to draw the Test and the series. Tendulkar, whose previous scores in the series had been 0, 1, 37, 0, 44, scored his then-best 241. VVS Laxman made his second century of the series and the two added 353 - the highest fourth-wicket stand for India - and India got to 705 for 7, at the time their highest total ever. They did not enforce the follow-on, and on the final day, when it was more or less evident the game was headed for a draw, the Waugh farewell party, which had begun in Brisbane, swung into action. At the end of the game Waugh was carried around the ground by his team-mates. Wisden wrote: "No one had ever left the cricketing stage like this; no one had dared."


1994
In one of the most dramatic finishes to any Test match, Australia made 111, the dreaded Nelson, to lose the Sydney Test to South Africa by an excruciating five runs. Ali Bacher, quoted in Wisden, called it "our finest achievement ever". Fanie de Villiers' 6 for 43 made it possible, as he nailed Australia's top four. It's a match often remembered for Damien Martyn's injudicious waft to cover - he didn't play another Test for over six years.


2010
Another dramatic finish featuring Australia. They completed a nerve-shredding 36-run victory over an exasperating Pakistan side in Sydney to become just the sixth team in Test history to win after trailing by 200-plus on the first innings. After bowling Australia out for 127 (Mohammad Asif took 6 for 41), Pakistan piled up 333. Michael Hussey brought Australia back into the game with an unbeaten 134, adding 123 with Peter Siddle (38 in 217 minutes) for the ninth wicket, to set Pakistan 176 to get in over a day and a half. Pakistan lost six wickets in reaching 103 but their newest batting hope, Umar Akmal, was still around. When he fell, trying to go over the infield, it was all over. Nathan Hauritz, the offspinner Pakistan had targeted though the summer, took 5 for 53.


2006
One more Sydney highlight. Ricky Ponting became the first man to score centuries in both innings of his 100th Test match to set up a stunning final-day victory, following a brave declaration by Graeme Smith. Ponting's first-innings 120 was a rescue effort as Australia fell to 54 for 3 in reply to South Africa's 451. He passed 8000 Test runs during the innings, virtually flawless in his shot-making and placement. The second century (an unbeaten 143 off 159 balls) turned a potential tight chase of 287 from 76 overs into a no-contest and Australia won by nearly 16 overs to spare.


1977
Despite the final day of the second Test between England and India in Calcutta starting with India needing 21 runs to avoid an innings defeat and only three wickets remaining, a near-capacity crowd, estimated at around 90,000, turned up to watch. Wisden reported that "ecstatic scenes were witnessed when India avoided an innings defeat", but the end came soon afterwards as England wrapped-up a ten-wicket win.


2004
A dazzling debut hundred on this day for West Indies' Dwayne Smith against South Africa at Newlands. Smith, who was only 20 at the time, came to the crease with his side wanting an improbable 447 to win, and was prepared to play his shots from the start. He reached his century with a crunching cover drive. It had taken 93 balls, with 15 fours and two sixes.


1948
Near the other end of the scale, Dayle Hadlee was born today. His achievements in Test cricket (71 wickets at 33.64) didn't match those of his famous brother Sir Richard (431 at 22.29) but they might have come closer if he hadn't lost part of a toe when he ran over his own foot with a lawnmower. His father, Walter, and his brother Barry also played for New Zealand.


2013
Australia whitewashed an injury-hit Sri Lanka 3-0, which may have taken the bite off losing at home to South Africa. It capped an incredible year for captain Michael Clarke, who scored three double-centuries, one triple, and notched up 1706 runs at nearly 90.


1930
Yet another Don Bradman entry. Batting for New South Wales against Queensland in Sydney, he hit a megalithic 452, the highest score in first-class cricket before Hanif Mohammad's 499 in 1958-59, and the highest not-out score before Brian Lara's 501 in 1994. He was just 21.


1984
Three giants from Oz bowed out. For Greg Chappell, Dennis Lillee and Rod Marsh, the Sydney Test against Pakistan included their last day in Test cricket. Chappell made 7110 runs and 24 hundreds. He also held a record 122 catches, including seven in one match, while Lillee took 355 wickets and Marsh made 355 dismissals - all of these Test records at the time. Ninety-five of those Marsh and Lillee ones featured both those players: c Marsh b Lillee is the most frequent dismissal in Test history.


1947
That great fast bowler Ray Lindwall (228 Test wickets at 23.03) was no rabbit with the bat. Against England in Melbourne, he hit the first of his two Test hundreds; the second fifty came in only 37 minutes.

1891
Another Australian fast-bowling legend was born. Ted McDonald's partnership with big Jack Gregory scared the wits out of a war-torn England in 1921. Light on his feet but fearsomely fast, McDonald played in only 11 Tests before joining Lancashire, whom he helped to the County Championship four times, including three in a row. He was killed in a bizarre accident, hit by a passing car after surviving a crash in his own.


1935
Birth of yet another Australian pace merchant, but not quite in the same category. When England lost the 1958-59 series down under, they muttered darkly about the bowling action of left-arm seamer Ian Meckiff. Nothing was done about it until the Brisbane Test against South Africa in 1963-64, when he was called for throwing four times in his only over and immediately retired from all levels of cricket. He'd taken a total of 45 Test wickets - but at a cost.


2015
West Indies managed to send a full-strength side to South Africa just two months after their players pulled out of the India tour over a contracts dispute, but that didn't prevent them from losing 2-0 in the Test series. In South Africa's innings victory in Centurion, Hashim Amla made a double-hundred, while AB de Villers and debutant Stiaan van Zyl scored centuries, and Dale Steyn took 6 for 34. De Villiers' 148 in Cape Town gave South Africa an eight-wicket win. West Indies' only hundreds - by Kraigg Brathwaite and Marlon Samuels - came in the rain-interrupted draw in Port Elizabeth.


Other birthdays
1931 Graeme Hole (Australia)
1965 RP Singh (India)
1965 Mike Allingham (Scotland)
1966 Shahid Saeed (Pakistan)
1973 Sairaj Bahutule (India)
1974 Ali Hussain Rizvi (Pakistan)
1979 Clea Smith (Australia)


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed May 03, 2017 3:18 am

January 7 down the years

Imran Khan signed off with 362 Test wickets and 3807 runs

1992
The last day of one of the longest and most successful Test careers, which began in 1971. Imran Khan took 362 Test wickets, including 40 (a record for Pakistan) against India in 1982-83, and hit six Test centuries. In the third Test against Sri Lanka, in Faisalabad, he didn't bowl, and made 22 and 0, but he did lead Pakistan to a face-saving, series-clinching three-wicket win. Oh, and after the end of his Test career there was the little matter of the 1992 World Cup.

2011
England wrapped up their first Ashes victory in Australia for 24 years with an unprecedented third innings victory of the series, this time in Sydney, where Alastair Cook was named Man of the Match and of the Series, after his 189 took his tally to 766 runs in seven innings. The final wicket was claimed by Chris Tremlett, who bowled Michael Beer off the inside edge. The day was also Paul Collingwood's last as a Test cricketer (he announced his retirement mid-way through the game).

1983
Australia regained the Ashes which they had lost in 1977 with a 2-1 win at home after the fifth Test was drawn. The first Test was also drawn and Australia won the next two - by seven wickets in Brisbane and eight wickets in Adelaide - to take the series lead. The fourth Test was a thriller that England won by three runs. After conceding a slim first-innings lead, England set Australia a target of 298. The hosts ended day four on 255 for 9, right-arm fast bowler Norman Cowans taking 6 for 77. Allan Border was unbeaten on 62 when Ian Botham took the final wicket. It was a particularly successful series for fast bowler Geoff Lawson, who took 34 wickets at just over 20, with a career-best 11 for 134 in Brisbane.

1987
Kapil Dev took his 300th Test wicket in an innings victory over Sri Lanka on an underprepared wicket in Cuttack, where he bowled slow-medium and produced shooters at will. Dilip Vengsarkar scored a career-best 166 despite the unpredictable bounce and movement, but Sri Lanka's batsmen couldn't cope with it and followed on, on day three. On the fourth morning, Kapil bowled Rumesh Ratnayake to get to the milestone, and after Ravi Shastri took for 4 for 11, India won their first home series since beating England in 1981-82.

1908
A tense finish in Melbourne. If Gerry Hazlitt's throw had hit the stumps, the game would have ended in Test cricket's first tie. Instead he missed, and England sneaked home by one wicket. Only fair: Australia had won the previous Test by two wickets.

1956
After batting through the whole of the previous day against New Zealand in Madras, Vinoo Mankad and Pankaj Roy completed their stand of 413, a then record for the first wicket in any Test match. Roy made 173, while Mankad's 231 was a record for India until Sunil Gavaskar scored an unbeaten 236 against West Indies in the same city in 1983-84.

2015
New Zealand kicked off the new year with an incredible turnaround in Wellington after conceding a first-innings lead of 135 against Sri Lanka. Kane Williamson's double-hundred and world-record sixth-wicket stand with keeper BJ Watling (who broke his own record partnership with Brendon McCullum, set at the same venue a year before) stole the thunder from Kumar Sangakkara's 11th double-century and helped New Zealand set a massive target and win 2-0. Hagley Oval had made its Test debut in the first match of the series, in which McCullum narrowly missed his fourth double-hundred of the year. Sri Lanka followed on and fought back with a big maiden hundred by opener Dimuth Karunaratne but still lost by eight wickets.

2017
David Warner became only the fifth batsman to score a century before lunch on the first day of a Test, and the first to do it in Australia, in a series-sweeping win over Pakistan in Sydney. Australia finished the first session on 126 for 0, with Warner's opening partner, Matt Renshaw, on 25. But the 20-year-old Renshaw cashed in later, making his maiden Test hundred - 184 in all - in his fourth match. Pakistan, who had lost the rain-hit second Test in Melbourne by an innings after scoring 443, couldn't muster up the will to stave off a clean sweep, despite Younis Khan making an unbeaten 175 - his first Test hundred in Australia. It was Pakistan's fourth consecutive series whitewash in the country.

1954
Birth of a Test cricketer whose son also played for England and who nearly appeared in the same Championship match with him. According to Mike Brearley, Geoff Boycott didn't do his new opening partner, Alan Butcher, any favours against India at The Oval in 1979, "almost paralysing him with his account of the risks of playing shots in a Test match". Butcher didn't exactly fail but his 14 and 20 weren't enough to win him a second cap. When he was called up to play against Derbyshire at The Oval in 1998, he was Surrey's 2nd XI coach and hadn't played in a Championship match for 12 years. At the same time, his son Mark was scoring his first Test century for England, against South Africa at Headingley.

1947
Despite a sixth day's play, the Melbourne match against England ended in a draw, the first in any Test in Australia since 1882. Not quite such an amazing fact when you realise that most of the matches in between were played to a finish.

1997
Not many teams could come back from losing their top three batsmen for nought to win a one-dayer, but then not many teams are like Pakistan. Against Australia they lost Aamer Sohail, Zahoor Elahi and Ijaz Ahmed, but Mohammad Wasim made 54 and Australia (whose top scorer was Michael Bevan with 24) could not reach a target of 150.

1981
Travis Friend, born today, made his international debut at 19, bowling with genuine pace despite having changed from legspin only two years earlier. He took his career-best 7 for 57 in Dhaka in 2001. But his career turned after he was one of the 15 rebels involved in the dispute with the board that followed the sacking of Heath Streak in April 2004. Friend played briefly for Derbyshire before drifting out of the professional game.

Other birthdays
1901 Greville Stevens (England)
1911 Mervyn Waite (Australia)
1918 Colin Snedden (New Zealand)
1928 Vijay Rajindernath (India)
1953 Agha Zahid (Pakistan)
1965 Mark Rushmere (South Africa)


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed May 03, 2017 3:28 am

January 8



Johnny Wardle: his outspokeness cost him his career


1923
A talented but ultimately controversial slow bowler was born. As well as orthodox left-arm spin, Johnny Wardle could bowl them out of the back of the hand: his chinamen and wrong'uns brought him 26 wickets at 13.80 in the 1956-57 series in South Africa. He took 102 Test wickets at only 20.39 each, and would have played in more Tests if Tony Lock hadn't been Jim Laker's spin twin at Surrey. Wardle's sacking by Yorkshire after he wrote a series of articles criticising the captain also ended his Test career: his invitation to tour Australia in 1958-59 was withdrawn. He died in Doncaster in 1985.

1909
Before South Africa were allowed back into international cricket, Bruce Mitchell, who was born today, had scored the most Test runs for them: 3471, at the impressive average of 48.88. A complete batsman whose Test career lasted nearly 20 years, he made eight Test centuries, including one in each innings at The Oval in 1947.

1949
There was so much unfulfilled potential in Lawrence Rowe, who was born today: his career was dogged by persistent eye trouble and (a tough one, this, for a professional cricketer) an allergy to grass. He showed what might have been by becoming the only batsman to hit a century and a double-century on his debut, against New Zealand in Kingston in 1971-72, followed by a triple-century against England in Bridgetown in 1973-74, which was described, among other things, as a "master performance" by the Wisden Almanack. It was also his maiden first-class century outside his native Jamaica.

1901
Talking of big scores made quickly, New South Wales completed their innings of 918 against South Australia in Sydney on this day. Made in only 560 minutes, with centuries from five different batsmen, it beat Yorkshire's 887 against Warwickshire at Edgbaston in 1896 and remained a world record until Victoria made 1059 against Tasmania in Melbourne in 1922-23.

1973 and 1981
Greg Chappell took his career-best Test and one-day figures on the same day - eight years apart. In the 1972-73 series against Pakistan, he took 5 for 61 in the first innings of the Sydney Test that Australia won by 52 runs to sweep the series. At the same ground, in the 1981 Benson & Hedges World Series Cup, his figures read 9.5-5-15-5 as India were bowled out for 63 - their lowest total at the time. Australia won by nine wickets. His victims, across both games, included Asif Iqbal, Mushtaq Mohammad and Sunil Gavaskar.

1991
Carl Rackemann won the Ashes. Well, not quite, but his 107-minute 9 had a big say in Australia grabbing the draw in the third Test, in Sydney, which gave them a decisive 2-0 lead with two to play. England had declared in arrears and Phil Tufnell and Eddie Hemmings seemed to be bowling them to victory on a slow turner. But they couldn't shift Rackemann, and Graham Gooch took an age to bring Devon Malcolm on. When he did, Malcolm cleaned up Rackemann straight away. England needed 255 off 28 overs, and Gooch and the promoted David Gower went for it - 81 runs came off 11 overs before a flurry of wickets. When Mike Atherton strode in at No. 6, everyone knew the game was up.

1961
Into a famous cricketing family, a son and nephew was born. Shoaib Mohammad's seven Test centuries for Pakistan added to the 23 made by his famous father Hanif and uncles Wazir and Mushtaq. He twice made 203 not out in Tests, against India in Lahore in 1989-90, and New Zealand in Karachi in 1990-91.

1913
Birth of Dennis Smith, who holds a unique little world record as the bowler who took his only Test wicket with his very first ball. It was a pretty good single scalp too, England's Eddie Paynter (Test batting average 59.23), bowled by Smith in Christchurch in 1932-33. He finished with 1 for 113 from 20 overs in his only Test, but New Zealand were saved by a dust storm and bad light after following on. 0

1991
Birth of Australian fast bowler Josh Hazlewood, who made his one-day debut at 19. But by the time he turned 25, Hazlewood had only played 13 matches in the format. He played a greater role in Tests after taking seven wickets in his first appearance, against India at the Gabba in December 2014. Hazlewood took 15 wickets in the Ashes in England the next year, and his second-innings 6 for 70 against New Zealand tilted the first day-night Test in Australia's favour in Adelaide in November. The home summer of 2016-17 was particularly satisfying for Hazlewood. He took 17 and 15 wickets in three Tests each against South Africa and Pakistan respectively.

Other birthdays
1902 Jack Iddon (England)
1965 Champaka Ramanayake (Sri Lanka)
1968 Desmond Chumney (Canada)
1981 Clare Shillington (Ireland)
1986 Tino Mawoyo (Zimbabwe)


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed May 03, 2017 4:13 am

I never heard about Vijay Rajendranath, jee new learning everyday in Down memory Lane
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Fri May 05, 2017 8:41 am

January 9 down the years



1968
A top batsman turned unsuccessful captain was born. Jimmy Adams' Test career started with a century against England, two in India, and an unbeaten double ton against New Zealand. But you can chart West Indies' decline by following his batting average, which was once the highest around: 81.07 after 12 Tests and 41.26 after 54. Given the captaincy when Brian Lara resigned it, Adams led West Indies to two rather streaky series wins but then captained them to their first series defeat against England since 1969, and went on to become the first player to captain a Test team to seven consecutive defeats, culminating in the 0-5 whitewash down under that cost him his job (as a batsman too).

1975
Australia's emphasis on sheer terrifying speed paid dividends as England capitulated to Lillee and Thomson again, losing the Ashes in this 171-run defeat in Sydney. John Edrich, made captain after Mike Denness dropped himself, had to go to hospital after the first ball he received from Lillee. Story of the series.

1951
Another day in January, another Ashes series won and lost. Australia's innings win in Sydney gave them a 3-0 lead in the series. Poor young John Warr had figures of 0 for 142, Alec Bedser and Freddie Brown also conceded 100, and the absence of injured legspinner Doug Wright didn't make any difference: he had a bowling average of 42.47 against Australia.

1971
A better day for England down under, and a big one for Bob Willis. Flown out as a replacement, he made his Test debut before being awarded his county cap - and enjoyed it fully, taking a very cheap wicket and making the first of his 55 Test not-outs, a record before Courtney Walsh. England's huge 299-run win in Sydney set them on their way to regaining the Ashes.

1996
A great performance from Shaun Pollock, on his one-day debut, gave South Africa victory over England in the first ODI, in Cape Town. With South Africa 107 for 6, Pollock cracked a run-a-ball 66 and then took 4 for 34. England lost by five runs a game they should have easily won. It set the tone for the series (which they lost 1-6, but could feasibly have won 4-3) and the World Cup that followed it, in which a thoroughly demoralised England failed to win a single game against Test opposition.

1996
For the first time in almost five years, Sri Lanka took a punt on opening up with Romesh Kaluwitharana, and boy did it pay off. He slammed a boundary-laden 77 in the day-nighter in Melbourne, Sri Lanka squeezed past Australia by three wickets, and almost inadvertently a pinch-hitting plan had come together. Within ten weeks, for all the paucity of Kalu's individual contributions, it would bring Sri Lanka the World Cup.

1871
Birth of perhaps the fastest bowler of all time. For a player who never appeared in a Test match, Charles Jesse Kortright had a reputation second to none. So many of his contemporaries attested to his sheer blinding speed that you have to believe it. At one stage in his career, from 1895 to 1898, he had bowled 201 of his 297 victims in first-class cricket. An amateur all his life, when he was asked by John Arlott if he ever did anything except bowl fast, he replied: yes, he played golf and bowled legspin.

2011
In the lead-up to the fourth season of the IPL, around 350 international and domestic cricketers went under the hammer and were bid for by the league's ten franchises. Gautam Gambhir was the most expensive signing, bought for US$2.4 million by Kolkata Knight Riders, who also paid big money for Yusuf Pathan ($2.1 million) and Jacques Kallis ($1.1million). The biggest surprise buy was Australian allrounder Daniel Christian, who had played just three T20s when Deccan Chargers bought him for $900,000. Eyebrows were raised when Sourav Ganguly, Chris Gayle and Brian Lara, who was looking to break into the IPL three years after retiring from international cricket, found no takers.

1956
Birth of a player who wasn't always popular in county changing rooms but who batted bravely in the last of his two Tests, both on the disastrous 1985-86 Caribbean tour (another blackwash). After making only 1 and 0 on his debut in Kingston, David Smith top-scored in each innings in Port-of-Spain. The fact that he made 47 and 32 says everything about the quality of West Indies' pace attack and the dodgy pitches they were allowed to bowl on.

1901
South Australia, all out for 156, one less than they made in their first knock, lost by the preposterous margin of an innings and 605 runs to New South Wales, who had scored a world record 918 on January 8, in Sydney.

1974
Craig Wishart, born today, was a capable top-order batsman and an attacking strokeplayer but scored his maiden century only in his 18th Test, in Chittagong. He did better in one-dayers, playing every game of the 2003 World Cup, and scoring an unbeaten 172 against Namibia. Wishart was one of the 15 players who joined the strike after a dispute with the board led to the sacking of Heath Streak in 2004. He returned in 2005 but again fell out with the board after refusing to sign a new and controversial contract, and announced his retirement, saying he was "tired of Zimbabwe cricket, the fighting, and everything".

Other birthdays
1859 James Cranston (England)
1887 Dan Taylor (South Africa)
1972 Gary Stead (New Zealand)
1973 Sher Lama (Hong Kong)
1976 Gareth Breese (West Indies)


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sat May 06, 2017 10:30 am

January 10 down the years

An Australian legend makes a classic double-century in Adelaide

Victor Trumper's 214 came in a losing cause


1911
In many people's view, Victor Trumper was the greatest batsman of all time. When you look at his Test average of 39.04, remember the appalling minefields he had to bat on - and believe the brilliance with which he did it. On this day in Adelaide he reached his double-century against South Africa, who won the match partly because no one else scored more than 54 in this Australian innings. Trumper's 214 is one of the highest Test scores in a losing cause.

2005
Bangladesh achieved their first Test victory, in their 35th Test, more than four years after their debut. And as in the rest of their successes of the time, left-arm spinners played a big role in the win, over Zimbabwe by 226 runs in Chittagong. Habibul Bashar scored 94, and Mohammad Rafique made 69 and took five wickets to give Bangladesh a first-innings lead of 176. Bashar scored another half-century in the second innings and then Enamul Haque Jr took 6 for 45 as Zimbabwe were bowled out for 154. Bangladesh's next Test win came four years later, against a depleted West Indies side that was missing its key players because of a strike.

1985
Indian allrounder Ravi Shastri smashed the fastest double-century of all time for Bombay in their Ranji Trophy zonal match against Baroda, taking just 113 minutes to reach 200 not out. In the course of his innings he became only the second batsman to hit six sixes in an over (after Garry Sobers in 1968), Tilak Raj being the unfortunate bowler. A week earlier Shastri had crawled to a seven-hour hundred against England in Calcutta.

2015
Playing a four-Test series against India shortly after the death of Phillip Hughes was hard on several Australian players, but their grief didn't show on the result margin - 2-0 in their favour when they drew in Sydney on this day. A win for Australia looked probable when India fell to 217 for 7 on a wearing fifth-day pitch, but Ajinkya Rahane and Bhuvneshwar Kumar hung in to see them through. It was among the fastest-scoring Tests of all (Australia clattered along at 6.27 in the second innings to set up the declaration), and featured hundreds from David Warner and Steven Smith, who had been prolific through the series, and for India by KL Rahul and their captain, Virat Kohli.

1903
No one could accuse Hugh Motley Thurlow (who was born today) of being a giant in Test cricket, but he trod in the footsteps of one. Don Bradman, the first player to score two Test triple-centuries, very nearly hit another on this day. Against South Africa in Adelaide in 1931-32, Bradman made 299 not out before Thurlow, batting at No. 11, ran himself out. In contrast with everything Bradman achieved, poor "Pud" Thurlow played in only this one Test, finishing with no runs, no wickets and no catches.

1930
Christchurch hosted the first day of the first Test to be played in New Zealand. Playing for one of two England teams touring at the time (the other went to the Caribbean), the debutant Maurice Allom took four wickets in five balls, including a hat-trick, to help dismiss the hosts for 112 (Roger Blunt 45 not out) on the way to winning the match by eight wickets.

1933
No great success at Test level, especially in the 1962-63 Ashes series, Len Coldwell, who was born today, was one of the great county stalwarts. Among his 1474 first-class wickets were the 139 that nearly won Worcestershire the Championship in 1962. He and Jack Flavell got there before long, bowling the county to consecutive titles, the first in their history, in 1964 and 1965.

1935
A horrible old sticky dog of a pitch led to a very low-scoring Test in Bridgetown. After two declarations and some furious juggling of both batting orders, Wally Hammond hit a six to win the match by four wickets and give England a series lead they couldn't hold. Eric Hollies was among the nine debutants in the match - five for England and four for West Indies.

1981
Jehan Mubarak, born today in Washington DC, returned to Sri Lanka to attend the Royal College, a breeding ground for future internationals. He made his Sri Lanka debut in 2002 and narrowly missed a maiden half-century in his second Test, in Centurion. He made his ODI debut later that year but failed to live up to the promise - averaging 16.57 in his 20 games. He was not picked for the 2007 World Cup, and while he has played off and on thereafter, he has been on the sidelines more often than not. In 2015, after two exceptional domestic seasons, Mubarak earned a recall to the Test side at the age of 34. However, after three unimpressive outings, against Pakistan and India, he was dropped once again.

1917
Left-arm pace bowler Tyrell Johnson, who was born today, played in only one match for West Indies, at The Oval in 1939, but it was enough for him to join the select list of bowlers who have taken a wicket with their first ball in Tests. England opener Walter Keeton played on to his first delivery, and Johnson also caught and bowled Len Hutton, but the war wrecked his chances of any more caps.

Other birthdays
1871 Ike Travers (Australia)
1975 James Kirtley (England)
1978 Johan van der Wath (South Africa)
1979 Victor Grandia (Netherlands)
1981 Alamgir Kabir (Bangladesh)


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sun May 07, 2017 12:58 am

Dinamix
If you wants to read current (may 7) Down memory I have option for you,Let me know I will provide access for that by PM
(Other day you says why from January)
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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 09, 2017 12:37 am

January 11 down the years

Rahul Dravid is born, and Hanif Mohammad falls one short of 500


Rahul Dravid scored over 13,000 runs in Tests and over 10,000 in ODIs


1973
When Sourav Ganguly made a hundred in his first Test innings, at Lord's in 1996, Rahul Dravid, who was born today, made 95 - nearly the first instance of two new caps scoring hundreds in the same innings. Both shared a record one-day stand of 318 against Sri Lanka at Taunton in the 1999 World Cup. In 2002, Dravid made four consecutive Test hundreds, including a masterful 148 in dreadful conditions at Headingley to set India up for a rare overseas victory. That was followed by his awesome display on the tour to Australia in 2003-04: in the second Test he batted a phenomenal 835 minutes, scoring 233 and an unbeaten 72, and steered India to a famous win. He went on to feature famously in overseas wins in Pakistan and the West Indies, and captained India to their first win in South Africa and first series win in England for 21 years. His Test career trundled along with few bumps on the way, but in March 2008 he became the third Indian to get to 10,000 runs in Tests and by 2011 was the second-highest run-maker after Sachin Tendulkar. That year was especially fruitful for Dravid. He ended 2011 as the top run scorer, with five hundreds, including three on a tough tour of England, and four half-centuries, but retired after a poor series in Australia later that year. Dravid was the first player to take 200 catches in Tests.

1959
Mighty little Hanif Mohammad enjoyed occupying the crease, but this was ridiculous. Batting for Karachi against Bahawalpur in Karachi, he tried to steal a run to keep the strike. World record though it was at the time, there's something excruciating about a scorecard entry that reads: run out for 499. Hanif's partner that day, Abdul Aziz, was tragically young when he had another one later that season: absent dead. We kid you not.

1994
Another huge score on the subcontinent, this time by a team, or at least most of one. Hyderabad declared at 944 for 6 against Andhra Pradesh in Secunderabad. Maturi Sridhar made 366, Vivek Jaisimha 211 and Noel David 207 - but Andhra held out for a draw with three wickets left and 502 runs to get.

1998
Muttiah Muralitharan didn't take ten wickets in any of his first 34 Tests, but after doing so for the first time on this day, against Zimbabwe in Kandy, he went on to do it more than 20 times in the rest of his career. Murali's second-innings 7 for 94 won this match for Sri Lanka by eight wickets.

1973
Needing only 158 to win the Sydney Test, Pakistan reached 83 for 3 only to collapse to 106 all out and lose the three-match series 0-3. Max Walker, in his perennial role as faithful third change, emerged from the shadows to take 5 for 3 in his last 30 balls to finish with 6 for 15 from 16 overs.

1979
An Australian side deprived of its Packer players had little chance against a seasoned England team, but they'd pulled back to 2-1 before this fourth Test in Sydney - only for the Nelson to rear its accursed head. The England spinners bowled them for 111 to win the match by 93 runs and retain the Ashes.

1996
The day Phil DeFreitas opened for England. Pinch-hitting was all the rage in advance of the World Cup, and though England promoted a glorified tailender, DeFreitas' 17, and a rumbustious 42-ball 55 from Graeme Hick, gave England the momentum to successfully chase South Africa's 263 in Bloemfontein.

1903
South African opener Jack Siedle, born today, made his debut for South Africa in 1928. He scored a century in his sixth Test, in Cape Town against England, who were his opponents in the first 13 of his 18 Tests. He was part of the 1935 side that won South Africa's first Test in England - after trying for 28 years - at Lord's but his only notable performance on the tour came in the first Test in Nottingham. The following series, against Australia at home, was his last and he scored two half-centuries - in Durban and Cape Town.

1927
Birth of New Zealand fast bowler Johnny Hayes. A tall right-arm bowler, on his day he was genuinely quick and could move the ball away from right-handers. He toured England under Walter Hadlee in 1949, but a groin injury kept him out for half the series. The first of his 15 Tests came against England in 1950-51 and the following season he produced possibly his best burst when he removed Gomez, Walcott and Worrell in eight balls. In 1955-56 he toured India and Pakistan with success, taking 35 wickets at 32.11 in first-class games, where he used the new ball with skill. He was less successful in the Tests, his 13 wickets in six outings costing 46.61. He quit cricket in 1961 and served as Morocco's honorary consul general in New Zealand until his retirement in 2004.

1971
In his second Test, Sri Lankan medium-pacer Sajeewa de Silva, born today, took 5 for 85 against India in Colombo, a performance he couldn't replicate in the rest of his brief career. His one-day career was longer, but he never took more than three wickets in a match. In 2007, he was a contender for Chaminda Vaas' place in the Test side but lost out to Farveez Maharoof.

Other birthdays
1862 Frank Sugg (England)
1972 Julia Price (Australia)


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Re: DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sat May 13, 2017 4:29 am

January 12 down the years

Richie Richardson made 16 hundreds in 86 Tests


1962
The calypso swagger of Richie Richardson, who was born today in Antigua, masked a shy, introverted character, on whom captaining a once-great side on the way out took its toll. In his pomp Richardson was a glorious player, his square-driving a particular delight. He made 16 Test hundreds, but the last came in a forgettable context - dethronement by Australia in Jamaica in 1994-95. Richardson was in charge then, as he was when West Indies were humiliated by Kenya in the 1996 World Cup.

1964
The king of parsimony. In the first Test between India and England in Madras, Bapu Nadkarni bowled 21 consecutive maiden overs, a record for six-ball overs, finishing with figures of 32-27-5-0. In the second innings his tight line and length deserted him as he took 6-4-6-2.

1960
Records galore for Garry Sobers and Frank Worrell, who punished England in Barbados with a partnership of 399, West Indies' highest for the fourth wicket and their highest for any wicket against England. Sobers made 226 and Worrell was unbeaten on 197, having batted for 682 minutes, then the longest innings by a West Indian. He and Sobers were the first pair to bat through two consecutive days of a Test, though there was a rest day in between and an hour was lost to rain on the first day of their alliance.

1940
Birth of the first New Zealander to take 100 Test wickets. The robust, indefatigable seamer Dick Motz wasn't used to success - New Zealand won only four of his 32 Tests - but he got to 100 in his last match, at The Oval in 1969. Good job he did, as at the end of the summer it was discovered that he'd been bowling for 18 months with a displaced vertebra. He retired immediately. As a beefy lower-order slogger Motz was a dangerous customer, and made three fifties, all against England, all laden with sixes.

1978
Australia lost back-to-back home Tests for the first time since 1954. If it's Sydney, it must be the spinners doing the damage: Messrs Bedi, Prasanna and Chandrasekhar shared 16 wickets. This squared the series at 2-2, but Australia took the series with a tight win in the final Test.

1995
A landslide in Johannesburg. South Africa thrashed Pakistan by a whopping 157 runs in the second Mandela Trophy final. Gary Kirsten and Mike Rindel had hammered 190 for the first wicket, and Pakistan showed no stomach for chasing 267: they were swiftly 42 for 6, and nobody made more than Wasim Akram's 26.

1995
More humiliation for England, who were beaten to a place in the quadrangular Benson & Hedges World Series final... by Australia A. England lost the last group match in Sydney comfortably but fell only two runs short of the 237 they needed to qualify for the final on run rate. Still, there were mitigating circumstances: as well as containing Merv Hughes and Paul Reiffel, the A side had a top six that read: Hayden, Blewett, Martyn, Bevan, Langer, Ponting. Frightening. The matches involving Australia A were eventually not counted as official - their presence was a one-season experiment, perhaps not entirely unconnected with the fact that Zimbabwe were the other team in the tournament.

1976
Gavin Rennie, born today, was a compact left-hand opener for Zimbabwe, who started off with four half-centuries in his first four Tests, in 1997-1998. He had a poor series in New Zealand soon after, bagging a pair in Auckland, but made his Test-best 93 in his next tour there, in 2000. Rennie was part of two unique occurrences in international cricket: when his brother John joined him for an ODI in Pakistan, it was the first instance of a team fielding three sets of brothers (Rennies, Flowers and Strangs). It happened again in a Test in 1997-98.

Other birthdays
1972 Paul Wilson (Australia)
1980 Carly Verheul (Netherlands)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sat May 13, 2017 4:57 am

January 13 down the years

Australia crumble at the SCG, and New Zealand lose comprehensively in their first Test

John Snow sent Australia crashing to 116 in Sydney in 1971


1971
A blistering spell of bowling from John Snow set England up for victory in the fourth Test, in Sydney. Snow steamrollered the Australian top order to reduce them to 21 for 4 before finishing the job the next day. He ended up with 7 for 40, and four of the seven were out for nought, including Ian Chappell first ball. The Wisden Almanack said "the pitch was without pace, but Snow... made the ball kick viciously from a worn patch and had his opponents apprehensive from first ball to last."

1930
New Zealand's first Test, in Christchurch, ended today, in less than two days. England were comfortable winners by eight wickets in a game where nobody reached 50. What was more memorable were the deeds of debutant Maurice Allom: in his eighth over in Test cricket he took four wickets in five balls, including a hat-trick. England were playing a concurrent series in the West Indies; this remains the only instance of a country playing in two Tests on the same day.

1982
Kamran Akmal, born today, made his first-class debut at the age of 15 as a useful wicketkeeper-batsman and got his Test break in 2002 as a replacement for the injured Rashid Latif. His first big contribution in Tests was a match-saving hundred in the Mohali Test in 2005. He started 2006 with two centuries against India: the one in Lahore was then the fastest by a keeper; the Karachi Test century was scored after Pakistan collapsed to 39 for 6 in a match they went on to win by 341 runs. Akmal experienced a horrendous patch as keeper later in the decade, culminating in horror shows in England and South Africa in 2007, and against Australia in 2009-10. He was finally dropped after a poor 2011 World Cup and lost his contract later that year. Ironically it was his youngest brother, Adnan, who replaced him as the Test keeper. Akmal was recalled and made it to the World T20 squad in 2012, and played sporadically for about another two years.

1985
A fine day for the 40-year-old West Indian captain Clive Lloyd, whose young legs helped him effect three run-outs and then club an unbeaten 52 to give his side a five-wicket win over Australia in the Benson & Hedges World Series one-dayer in Brisbane.

1911
South Africa's first Test win over Australia. They did it in Adelaide, in a match of 1646 runs and four centuries, including a monumental 214 not out from Victor Trumper, which was the highest score in a Test defeat at the time.

1983
With three needed off the last ball, Vic Marks was bowled by Martin Snedden to give New Zealand a one-day victory over England at the MCG, despite a luscious 122 from David Gower, who was opening. Two days later Gower went one better. Back at No. 3 after opening in Melbourne, he caned the Kiwis all round Brisbane for 158 off 118 balls.

1981
Another tight, tense one-day win for New Zealand, this time in Sydney. They beat Australia by one run when the alarmingly named Shaun Francis Graf was run out off the last ball.

1978
Australia lifted the women's World Cup for the first time, defeating England in the final by a comprehensive eight wickets. Only four teams contested the tournament - India, England, New Zealand and Australia - after West Indies and Netherlands had to withdraw because of financial difficulties, and only six matches were played. But that was six more than expected: fears the tournament would be off were ended only when India agreed to play host.

1982
A tall and rangy fast bowler capable of searing pace and high accuracy, Jermaine Lawson, born today, burst into Test cricket in 2002, picking up 6 for 3 in his third Test, in Dhaka. The following year he demolished Australia's first innings in Antigua with a career-best 7 for 78, which set West Indies on their way to a historic victory. His action was subsequently reported, and though he was cleared after remedying it, he struggled to return to his previous best. A spinal stress fracture sidelined him further. In 2008 he signed on as a Kolpak for Leceistershire.

1981
Birth of England opener Caroline Atkins, who came into the spotlight with a record 200-run stand against India in Lucknow in 2002. But she took a while to build on the reputation the innings gave her, and it was only in 2008 that she scored her maiden one-day hundred - against South Africa at Lord's. Atkins went on to play a big part in England's victorious World Cup campaign in 2009 with three half-centuries and two century stands with Claire and Sarah Taylor. Atkins also played the World T20 that followed, but got to bat only twice. She also played the 2010-11 Ashes Test but was dropped after that.

Other birthdays
1948 Kenia Jayantilal (India)
1963 Dirk Tazelaar (Australia)
1976 Gary Brent (Zimbabwe)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sat May 13, 2017 4:58 am

Boy30,
Today is 13th, so I will update daily, easy to remember till I get Lousy or away from Country, but I will update.
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sun May 14, 2017 11:27 am

:lmao: :lolup: :mrgreen:
January 14 down the years

Bodyline reaches the height of its powers in Adelaide

Bill Woodfull ducks a bouncer from Harold Larwood in Adelaide


1933
The day a cricketing drama turned into a mini-series. England's Bodyline tactics had antagonised the Australians before now, but on the second day of the third Test, in Adelaide, all hell broke loose. Bill Woodfull was struck over the heart to conclude a fearsome working-over, and then two days later Bertie Oldfield sustained a fractured skull when he missed a hook. For a while it looked like the whole tour would be called off, but order was eventually restored and England romped home by 338 runs.

1898
Test cricket's first maximum. There had been sixes before in Tests, but all with the aid of overthrows, and Australia's Joe Darling managed the real thing when he smacked the ball out of Adelaide Oval to reach his century in the first Test against England. In those days you had to hit it out of the ground to get six - clearing the boundary was only worth five.

1908
With Australia at 180 for 7, effectively 102, given the first-innings lead, England looked set to close the third Ashes Test in Adelaide with a 2-1 lead. That's when Clem Hill came in. Battling influenza and the heat, Hill made a splendid century. Support came from debutant Roger Hartigan and the two went on to add 243 - then the highest stand in Test cricket. At stumps both had got their hundreds and Australia were at 397 for 7. The last three wickets put on 326 - only three other teams have repeated the feat since - and Australia went on to win by 245 runs. Wisden Cricket Monthly said: "A shilling collection at the ground had raised £24 from which Hartigan was bought a gold chain and pendant; and later the Mayor of Brisbane presented him with a gold watch."

1979
Daren Ganga, born today, had a phlegmatic approach as a Test opener but didn't get the big scores till his seventh series, in 2003, when he made back-to-back hundreds against Australia. He played a handful of Tests over the next two years, and came back in 2006, when he scored 135 in the drawn Test against India in St Kitts, and aggregated 344 in the four series. A successful tour of Pakistan followed, and then, while touring England as vice-captain, Ganga got to lead the side when Ramnaresh Sarwan was injured. Ganga led Trinidad & Tobago to the Stanford 20/20 title and then to the Champions League T20 final in 2009. When he stepped down as T&T captain in 2011 - after nine years at the helm - he was the country's most successful captain.

2009
One of the most gripping Ranji Trophy finals in recent history was clinched by Mumbai - their 39th title - after they beat Karnataka by six runs on the fourth day in Mysore. Karnataka's opening bowlers - R Vinay Kumar and Abhimanyu Mithun - kept Mumbai to 233 but the home side was bowled out for 130 as medium-pacer Aavishkar Salvi took 5 for 31. Mithun took 6 for 71 (nine for the match) in Mumbai's second innings and Karnataka were set 338 to win. Their 20-year-old batsman Manish Pandey, already playing in the IPL, scored a 151-ball 144, but the side collapsed after he fell with 83 more required. Ajit Agarkar and Dhawal Kulkarni took the last five wickets to fall for 71 runs.

2017
Eight years later, Mumbai couldn't repeat the feat against Gujarat, who won their first Ranji Trophy title by pulling off the highest chase in the tournament's final in a five-wicket win in Indore. Captain Parthiv Patel scored 90 and 143 and made century partnerships with Manprit Juneja in both innings. Twenty-two-year-old medium-pacer Chintan Gaja, playing in only his third first-class match, took a career-best 6 for 121. Mumbai hadn't lost a Ranji final since 1990-91.

1969
Few England cricketers have had as much bad luck as Martin Bicknell, who was born today. His first tour was the ill-fated Ashes trip of 1990-91, his debut the Headingley bashing by Australia in 1993, after which he was plagued with injuries in the mid-90s. After that Bicknell became the most consistent bowler in county cricket, and he could bat too: in 2001 he averaged 46 with the bat, 21 with the ball; in 2000 it was 31 and 17; in 1999, 33 and 18. Bicknell was recalled for the home series against South Africa in 2003. He played the last two Tests and his 4 for 84 at The Oval helped England square the rubber at two apiece before he was pensioned off for good. He retired in 2006 with 1047 wickets for his county and 6740 runs as one of England's "nearly" men of the 1990s.

1937
A career of many highlights for Ken Higgs, who was born today. A useful fast-medium bowler and dogged tailender who played 15 Tests, he took three first-class hat-tricks in his career, two for Lancashire and one for Leicestershire, and another in the 1974 Benson and Hedges Cup final. He also contributed 63 to a last-wicket stand of 128 with John Snow against West Indies at The Oval in 1966, when England recovered from 166 for 7 to reach 527. But he and Ray Illingworth trumped that 11 years later, when, astonishingly, they led Leicestershire from 45 for 9 to 273 all out. Higgs was run out for 98, his highest first-class score. As Leicestershire coach in 1986, he returned at the age of 49 in an injury crisis and took a five-for against Yorkshire.

1959
An England batsman is born... in Germany. Hampshire stalwart Paul Terry, who was born in Osnabruck, was picked for two Tests against a rampant West Indies side in 1984. It was an unforgiving baptism - he failed to reach double figures in three innings and had his arm broken by a short ball from Winston Davis. Despite showing great courage in returning to the crease with his arm in a sling - allowing Allan Lamb to reach a hundred - he did not play for England again.

1983
If you take 12 wickets on debut, including eight in the first innings, you'd expect it to be the start of a fine career. Alas, that's not how it turned out for Jason Krejza, the Australia offspinner, who was born today, and took a dozen in Nagpur. Krejza conceded more runs than anyone in their maiden Test performance, and played only one more Test - against South Africa - in which he took one wicket, before being dropped.

2017
South Africa beat Sri Lanka by an innings and 118 runs at the Wanderers, to complete an emphatic 3-0 series whitewash. Hashim Amla, who hadn't scored a Test hundred in the last year, became the eighth batsman to get to three figures in his 100th Test, but it was JP Duminy who top-scored for the home team with a fluent 155. Sri Lanka then subsided to 131 and 177 in the face of a good showing by South Africa's all-pace attack. Angelo Mathews described it as the worst defeat of his tenure.


Other birthdays
1901 George Gladstone (West Indies)
1920 Donald Beard (New Zealand)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sun May 14, 2017 11:29 am

:lmao: :lolup: :mrgreen:
January 14 down the years

Bodyline reaches the height of its powers in Adelaide

1933
The day a cricketing drama turned into a mini-series. England's Bodyline tactics had antagonised the Australians before now, but on the second day of the third Test, in Adelaide, all hell broke loose. Bill Woodfull was struck over the heart to conclude a fearsome working-over, and then two days later Bertie Oldfield sustained a fractured skull when he missed a hook. For a while it looked like the whole tour would be called off, but order was eventually restored and England romped home by 338 runs.

1898
Test cricket's first maximum. There had been sixes before in Tests, but all with the aid of overthrows, and Australia's Joe Darling managed the real thing when he smacked the ball out of Adelaide Oval to reach his century in the first Test against England. In those days you had to hit it out of the ground to get six - clearing the boundary was only worth five.

1908
With Australia at 180 for 7, effectively 102, given the first-innings lead, England looked set to close the third Ashes Test in Adelaide with a 2-1 lead. That's when Clem Hill came in. Battling influenza and the heat, Hill made a splendid century. Support came from debutant Roger Hartigan and the two went on to add 243 - then the highest stand in Test cricket. At stumps both had got their hundreds and Australia were at 397 for 7. The last three wickets put on 326 - only three other teams have repeated the feat since - and Australia went on to win by 245 runs. Wisden Cricket Monthly said: "A shilling collection at the ground had raised £24 from which Hartigan was bought a gold chain and pendant; and later the Mayor of Brisbane presented him with a gold watch."

1979
Daren Ganga, born today, had a phlegmatic approach as a Test opener but didn't get the big scores till his seventh series, in 2003, when he made back-to-back hundreds against Australia. He played a handful of Tests over the next two years, and came back in 2006, when he scored 135 in the drawn Test against India in St Kitts, and aggregated 344 in the four series. A successful tour of Pakistan followed, and then, while touring England as vice-captain, Ganga got to lead the side when Ramnaresh Sarwan was injured. Ganga led Trinidad & Tobago to the Stanford 20/20 title and then to the Champions League T20 final in 2009. When he stepped down as T&T captain in 2011 - after nine years at the helm - he was the country's most successful captain.

2009
One of the most gripping Ranji Trophy finals in recent history was clinched by Mumbai - their 39th title - after they beat Karnataka by six runs on the fourth day in Mysore. Karnataka's opening bowlers - R Vinay Kumar and Abhimanyu Mithun - kept Mumbai to 233 but the home side was bowled out for 130 as medium-pacer Aavishkar Salvi took 5 for 31. Mithun took 6 for 71 (nine for the match) in Mumbai's second innings and Karnataka were set 338 to win. Their 20-year-old batsman Manish Pandey, already playing in the IPL, scored a 151-ball 144, but the side collapsed after he fell with 83 more required. Ajit Agarkar and Dhawal Kulkarni took the last five wickets to fall for 71 runs.

2017
Eight years later, Mumbai couldn't repeat the feat against Gujarat, who won their first Ranji Trophy title by pulling off the highest chase in the tournament's final in a five-wicket win in Indore. Captain Parthiv Patel scored 90 and 143 and made century partnerships with Manprit Juneja in both innings. Twenty-two-year-old medium-pacer Chintan Gaja, playing in only his third first-class match, took a career-best 6 for 121. Mumbai hadn't lost a Ranji final since 1990-91.

1969
Few England cricketers have had as much bad luck as Martin Bicknell, who was born today. His first tour was the ill-fated Ashes trip of 1990-91, his debut the Headingley bashing by Australia in 1993, after which he was plagued with injuries in the mid-90s. After that Bicknell became the most consistent bowler in county cricket, and he could bat too: in 2001 he averaged 46 with the bat, 21 with the ball; in 2000 it was 31 and 17; in 1999, 33 and 18. Bicknell was recalled for the home series against South Africa in 2003. He played the last two Tests and his 4 for 84 at The Oval helped England square the rubber at two apiece before he was pensioned off for good. He retired in 2006 with 1047 wickets for his county and 6740 runs as one of England's "nearly" men of the 1990s.

1937
A career of many highlights for Ken Higgs, who was born today. A useful fast-medium bowler and dogged tailender who played 15 Tests, he took three first-class hat-tricks in his career, two for Lancashire and one for Leicestershire, and another in the 1974 Benson and Hedges Cup final. He also contributed 63 to a last-wicket stand of 128 with John Snow against West Indies at The Oval in 1966, when England recovered from 166 for 7 to reach 527. But he and Ray Illingworth trumped that 11 years later, when, astonishingly, they led Leicestershire from 45 for 9 to 273 all out. Higgs was run out for 98, his highest first-class score. As Leicestershire coach in 1986, he returned at the age of 49 in an injury crisis and took a five-for against Yorkshire.

1959
An England batsman is born... in Germany. Hampshire stalwart Paul Terry, who was born in Osnabruck, was picked for two Tests against a rampant West Indies side in 1984. It was an unforgiving baptism - he failed to reach double figures in three innings and had his arm broken by a short ball from Winston Davis. Despite showing great courage in returning to the crease with his arm in a sling - allowing Allan Lamb to reach a hundred - he did not play for England again.

1983
If you take 12 wickets on debut, including eight in the first innings, you'd expect it to be the start of a fine career. Alas, that's not how it turned out for Jason Krejza, the Australia offspinner, who was born today, and took a dozen in Nagpur. Krejza conceded more runs than anyone in their maiden Test performance, and played only one more Test - against South Africa - in which he took one wicket, before being dropped.

2017
South Africa beat Sri Lanka by an innings and 118 runs at the Wanderers, to complete an emphatic 3-0 series whitewash. Hashim Amla, who hadn't scored a Test hundred in the last year, became the eighth batsman to get to three figures in his 100th Test, but it was JP Duminy who top-scored for the home team with a fluent 155. Sri Lanka then subsided to 131 and 177 in the face of a good showing by South Africa's all-pace attack. Angelo Mathews described it as the worst defeat of his tenure.


Other birthdays
1901 George Gladstone (West Indies)
1920 Donald Beard (New Zealand)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sun May 14, 2017 11:24 pm

:lmao: :popcorn: :lolup:
January 15 down the years

Hirwani: 16 wickets at the age of 19


1988
A dream debut for 19-year-old Indian legspinner Narendra Hirwani. He bowled his side to a series-levelling victory over West Indies in Madras with eight wickets in each innings, and his match figures of 16 for 136 surpassed the previous best on debut - Australian Bob Massie's 16 at Lord's in 1972 - by one run. Hirwani took full advantage of West Indies' horribly one-dimensional attempts to smear him out of the attack: five were out stumped by Kiran More in the second innings, and six in the match, both Test records.

1895
Another fairytale debut. Albert Trott, who played for both Australia and England, took 8 for 43 in Adelaide against England, to give Australia a crushing 382-run victory. It concluded a great debut for Trott, who had already hit 38 and 72 (both not out) batting at No. 10.

1930
The legendary George Headley was out for 21 in his first Test innings, but he made it a fine debut, scoring 176 in the second innings in Bridgetown to ensure West Indies avoided defeat for the first time - it was their fourth Test. Two games later, he hit centuries in both innings in West Indies' first Test win, in Georgetown. Headley averaged nearly 100 per Test in his 22 matches and finished with a batting average of 60.83 - a career mark bettered by only Don Bradman and Graeme Pollock.

2012
In Perth, where four years before, India had halted Australia's victory spree, the home side took less than three days to seal a 3-0 win over the same opposition. The WACA pitch had some of its old bite and bounce, and both teams had dropped their spinners for four quicks, but only India found the going tough, folding for 161 and 171. For Australia, David Warner alone got 180, during which he made the fastest Test century by an opener, off 69 balls. Ben Hilfenhaus, who had come into the series having been out for nearly a year, took eight wickets, including three in one over. It was India's seventh consecutive loss in overseas Tests, and to make matters worse, their captain, MS Dhoni, was banned for the next Test for India's slow over rate.

2017
Pakistan won their first international match against Australia in Australia in 12 years when they strangled them with spin in an ODI in Melbourne. Slow bowlers Imad Wasim, Shoaib Malik and stand-in captain Mohammad Hafeez exploited the variable pace of the surface to restrict Australia to 220. Hafeez then made 72, and was not troubled by Australia's spinners at all, taking ten runs off an over from offspinner Travis Head.

1959
A crawl for Colin Cowdrey in Sydney. His hundred in the third Test against Australia took 362 minutes, and was the slowest in Ashes Tests until Bob Woolmer went 32 minutes better (or worse) in 1975.

1963
More dead-batted Ashes fare, again in Sydney. Batting one-handed because of an injured shoulder, England wicketkeeper John Murray took exactly 100 minutes and 100 balls for his unbeaten 3. It was a brave effort, but ultimately futile - Australia eased home by eight wickets in the afternoon session on this the final day.

1967
He didn't concede a single bye when India racked up over 550 in a Test, but all Yorkshire's Richard Blakey, who was born today, is really remembered for being gratuitously tortured by Anil Kumble in 1992-93. Blakey made 0, 6, 1 and 0, and was totally helpless against the Kumble flipper. Three of the four dismissals were bowled, the other lbw. All this after England picked Blakey ahead of Jack Russell because of his superior batting.

1856
Birth of a man who would have approved of all this grim batsmanship. William Scotton was undeniably skilled, but he was the ultimate exponent of a safety-first attitude. In one Test against Australia, at The Oval in 1886, he contributed just 34 (spread over four hours) to an opening partnership of 170 with WG Grace. But he was a troubled soul, and depression made him take his own life in 1893.

1987
A key moment in the renaissance of Australian cricket. Dead Ashes rubbers may have meant little to them ten years later, but in Sydney today they beat England by 55 runs to end a run of 14 matches without a win. Set up by a mighty 184 from Dean Jones, the 30-year-old Peter Taylor, making his Test debut after only six first-class matches (just one of them that season), bowled them to victory. When he was called up, many pundits thought the selectors had got the wrong Taylor, but the other one - the unrelated Mark, who was even interviewed on TV and congratulated on his selection - would have to wait another two years for his debut.

1985
Records galore for Graeme Fowler and Mike Gatting on a memorable Madras day. They cracked 201 and 207 in the fourth Test against India - the first time in 610 Tests that two Englishmen had made double-hundreds in the same innings. Gatting's was the highest score by an Englishman in India, and it set up an eventual nine-wicket victory despite another charming hundred from Mohammad Azharuddin, his second in his first two Tests (he soon made it three in three). It gave England a 2-1 lead, which they held onto to become the first side to win a series in India from behind.

1983
Another day when two double-centuries were scored against India, this time by the Pakistan duo of Javed Miandad and Mudassar Nazar. The two had added an unbroken 164 on the previous day in Hyderabad, and extended it to 451, equalling the then world record, held by the Don and Bill Ponsford. Both Miandad and Mudassar made personal bests, scoring 280 not out and 231, more than enough for India, who could manage only 189 and 273 in their two innings. Pakistan secured a 3-0 lead in the six-Test series, and the scoreline stayed the same - the final two Tests were drawn.

1978
For much of his career it appeared the curly-haired 6'4" Ryan Sidebottom, born today, would remain a one-cap Test wonder like his father Arnie. He'd been handed his debut in 2001 against Pakistan, but after a wicketless performance was banished back to county cricket and then overlooked as England coach Duncan Fletcher searched for fast bowlers with raw pace. Sidebottom finally got his chance under Peter Moores as an injury replacement and took 16 wickets against the visiting West Indies, including eight wickets at Headingley in 2007. He did even better when England toured New Zealand in 2008, taking ten in Hamilton and 24 overall in the three Tests. But injuries pushed him down the pecking order thereafter.

2002
Muttiah Muralitharan continued his record-breaking ways, this time reaching the 400-wicket landmark by bowling Henry Olonga on the fourth morning of the Galle Test to end Zimbabwe's first innings at 236. The milestone took him 72 Tests, eight fewer than Richard Hadlee, and at 29 years and 273 days he became the youngest bowler to take 400, beating Shane Warne by more than two years. Olonga's wicket gave him his 33rd five-for; he took four more in the second innings and Sri Lanka won by 315 runs.

1983
Glorious stuff from David Gower, whose match-winning 158 in the Benson & Hedges World Series match against New Zealand in Brisbane took just 118 balls. It included 18 fours and four sixes, and was the highest one-day score by an Englishman until Robin Smith's violent 167 against Australia at Edgbaston in 1993.

1975
Birth of the Test bowler who didn't bowl. New Zealand legspinner Greg Loveridge got his one cap against Zimbabwe in Hamilton in 1995-96, but he fractured a knuckle while batting - on his 21st birthday too. He didn't get a chance again, which might seem harsh, but not if you look at his first-class record. He also played for Cambridge University.

Other birthdays
1956 Paul Parker (England)
1960 Tim Curtis (England)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 1:27 am

:lmao: :lolup: :popcorn:
January 16 down the year

When Australia and England came close to Ashes war

Bill Woodfull is struck by Harold Larwood in Adelaide


1933
If January 14 had been the day it all kicked off on the pitch during the infamous Adelaide Test, it got even worse after the rest day. A media furore broke in the morning with revelations of the conversation between Bill Woodfull and Pelham Warner, the MCC manager, on the Saturday. At the ground, mounted police were deployed on standby outside and it proved a wise precaution. In the afternoon Bert Oldfield was struck on the head by Harold Larwood and the 32,000 crowd, already angered by what had happened earlier in the game, was incensed. Police ringed the boundary, Douglas Jardine was pelted with fruit, but the day ended without any further disturbances.

2017
Bangladesh's 595 for 8 declared in Wellington became the highest total made by a team that went on to lose, after New Zealand bowled them out for 160 in the second innings and Kane Williamson gunned down the target of 217 inside 40 overs. In making his maiden double-century, Shakib Al Hasan set the record for Bangladesh's highest Test score - 217 - and the country's highest partnership - 359 with Mushfiqur Rahim. Tom Latham's 177 restricted Bangladesh's lead to 56, which they struggled to build on, especially because of injuries to Imrul Kayes and Mushfiqur. Williamson became the first New Zealand batsman to make three centuries in fourth-innings chases.

1993
Bright stuff from Dean Jones. In the first final of the annual World Series in Sydney, he demanded that Curtly Ambrose remove his white wristbands because they were disturbing his concentration. Rags don't come any redder. An incensed Ambrose (who had come on first-change, behind Phil Simmons!) did as asked, and promptly tossed Australia to defeat with 5 for 32.

2016
Five months after he took 8 for 15 to dismiss Australia for 60 at Trent Bridge, Stuart Broad bowled another terrific spell, of 6 for 17, this time in Johannesburg, to dismiss South Africa for 83 - which was their second two-digit total in three months. Broad's second-innings spell of 5 for 1 took South Africa from 23 for 0 to 35 for 5. England easily knocked off the 74 required and took a 2-0 lead in the four-Test series. To add to their misery, South Africa lost their No.1 Test ranking to India following the defeat.

2006
One of the flattest, most turgid Tests in history, between India and Pakistan, was brought to a semblance of life on the fourth afternoon when India's openers ground inexorably towards one of their country's proudest batting records. Pankaj Roy and Vinoo Mankad's opening stand of 412 had been the world record for almost 50 years, but by the close Virender Sehwag and Rahul Dravid were just nine runs adrift. Fate, however, had the final say, and fog wiped out all but 14 balls of the final day - in which time Sehwag fell with the score on 410.

1931
Don Bradman scored his fourth double-century in less than seven months, and Australia beat West Indies by an innings and 217 runs in Brisbane. Bradman was dropped when on 4 and went on to score 223, then the highest innings by an Australian at home. He and Bill Ponsford added 229 for the second wicket - the highest then in Australia - after Archie Jackson was out first ball. Twelve months later Bradman had scored two more centuries and two more doubles.

1956
"Black Diamond" is born. Wayne Daniel may not have been the scariest fast bowler in county cricket in the late 1970s - Sylvester Clarke was on the scene, and Daniel lacked his outright nastiness - but he still made playing against Middlesex a less-than-appetising proposition. Middlesex had snapped Daniel up after he impressed on West Indies' all-conquering English tour of 1976. Like Clarke he would have played many more Tests than he did (ten) were it not for the brilliance of his West Indian contemporaries.

1990
Terry Alderman was right on the money to give Australia victory over Pakistan in the first Test at the MCG. Alderman grabbed five lbws - although they were by no means all clear-cut - in the second innings, and despite a fine hundred from Ijaz Ahmed, Australia got home by 92 runs with 9.1 overs to spare.

1911
Birth of Ivan Barrow, the West Indian wicketkeeper who played 11 Tests between 1930 and 1939. Tidy with the gloves and useful with the bat, he had only one Test score in excess of 27 - but he made it count, cracking 105 and adding 200 for the second wicket with George Headley at Old Trafford in 1933. Theirs were the first centuries by West Indian batsmen in England. Barrow died in his native Jamaica in 1979.

1997
There have been more than a dozen one-day hat-tricks, but only one by a man playing in his last match. That was Australian seamer Anthony Stuart, who took Ijaz Ahmed, Mohammad Wasim and Moin Khan with consecutive deliveries in a haul of 5 for 26 against Pakistan in Melbourne. It was only his third match, but a record of eight wickets at 13.62 wasn't enough for the Australian selectors.

1996
A landmark day for Sri Lanka, who chased 243 to beat Australia in a one-dayer at the MCG with a conviction that made a mockery of their status as underdogs for the forthcoming World Cup. Typically, one of their jet-propelled openers was to the fore - Romesh Kaluwitharana slammed a 31-ball 50, taking a particular liking to Glenn McGrath. You didn't see the great metronome with figures of 9.4-0-76-1 too often.

Other birthdays
1855 Alexander Webbe (England)
1876 Claude Buckenham (England)
1964 Trevor Barsby (Australia)
1971 Hamish Anthony (West Indies)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:02 am

January 17 down the years


Clyde Walcott is born, and Gavaskar and Solkar open with the ball



1926
One of the Three Ws was born. A glorious batsman with a stunning square cut, Clyde Walcott, with Everton Weekes and Frank Worrell, took West Indian cricket to a new level in the 1940s and '50s. Between 1953 and 1955 he made an astonishing ten centuries in 12 Tests, five of them in one series against Australia - but only one of them came in a winning cause. That was his mighty 220 in Bridgetown, which saw off England. He later became an ICC match referee, but had the misfortune to kick off (and, as it transpired, end) his second career with the fractious denouement to the England-Pakistan series in 1992. He died in 2006, aged 80, and was buried alongside Frank Worrell at a site that overlooks the cricket ground named in their honour.

1973
When you're playing India away, and the new ball is taken by Eknath Solkar (18 Test wickets at 59) and, for the first time, that express quickie Sunny Gavaskar (one wicket at 206), it's a fair bet the pitch is going to turn square sooner rather than later. And so it proved in Chennai: Solkar and Gavaskar bowled only five overs in the match, and Bishan Bedi, Bhagwath Chandrasekhar, Erapalli Prasanna and Salim Durani shared all 20 wickets in India's four-wicket win over England. The match also marked the return to Test cricket of the Nawab of Pataudi Jr, now known as Mansur Ali Khan - he had been stripped of his royal title by the Indian government since his last Test appearance in 1969.

1925
Pakistan's first Test captain is born. An attacking left-hand batsman and tidy slow left-armer, Abdul Kardar held the post in Pakistan's first 23 Tests, having already played three Tests for India as Abdul Hafeez. He led Pakistan to a famous victory at The Oval in 1954, and went on to become a respected if somewhat dictatorial figure of authority as president of the PCB. He died in Islamabad in 1996.

1912
A second consecutive century from Jack Hobbs - this one a massive 187 - set up England for a seven-wicket win over Australia in Adelaide, putting them 2-1 up in a series they would eventually cruise 4-1. It was a match in which Joe Vine, the Sussex allrounder, who would make his England debut in the next Test, substituted for the injured Australian Victor Trumper and caught his team-mate "Tiger" Smith.

2016
How many batsmen do you need to chase 169 in a T20? Only two, if you are New Zealand. Martin Guptill, in exceptional limited-overs form, and Kane Williamson added a record 171 in 17.4 overs against Pakistan in Hamilton - the largest stand in T20I for any wicket. Guptill made 87 and Williamson 72 in what was also the largest successful chase in T20 history.

1908
An Englishman with a Test average of 64 is born. Bryan Valentine only played seven matches for his country, but he found time for two centuries - one on debut, in Bombay in 1933-34 - and a 97. His average was rather deceptive, though, as it more than doubled his first-class one. He died in Otford, Kent in 1983.

1928
The crossover between cricket and baseball is often discussed, but Australia's Ken Archer - who was born today - is one of the few cricketers to be offered a baseball contract in America. He didn't take up the chance, but he did play five Tests for Australia between 1950 and 1951, making three scores in the 40s but no half-centuries. His brother Ron also played for Australia.

1999
A classical 108 gave Graeme Hick the Man-of-the-Match award in England's World Series win over Australia at the SCG. It started Hick off on a storming run of form, in which he made scores of 108, 66 not out, 126 not out and 109, but he shot his bolt, and by the time of the World Cup four months later he was back to his lame worst. Typical Hick really, who apart from 83 in the 1992 semi-final never really delivered in the big tournaments: his only World Cup hundred came against the Netherlands in Peshawar, and he made 17 in the final of 1992, 8 in the quarters in 1996, and a first-baller in the winner-takes-all showdown against India in 1999.

2008
Wicket No. 600 for Anil Kumble, with the dismissal of Andrew Symonds on the second day of the Perth Test. Kumble joined two other spinners, Muttiah Muralitharan and Shane Warne, when he reached the mark.

Other birthdays
1913 Yuvraj of Patiala (India)
1939 Antao D'Souza (Pakistan)
1977 Matthew Walker (New Zealand)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:06 am

January 18 down the years


It took de Villiers 19 minutes to get to his fifty and 40 to his hundred

2015
Just a year after New Zealand's Corey Anderson broke the record for the fastest ODI hundred - getting one off 36 balls - South Africa's AB de Villiers bettered it by five balls, against West Indies in Johannesburg. He also broke the record for the fastest fifty, reaching his in 16 balls, one less than Sanath Jayasuriya took in 1996, and equalled the one for most sixes in an innings - 16. Hashim Amla and Rilee Rossouw also made hundreds in the game, the first time three triple-figure scores were made in an ODI innings, and South Africa scored 439. In reply, West Indies managed 291 for 7.

2000
A glorious victory for England - or so we thought. After unprecedented collusion between Hansie Cronje and Nasser Hussain, which led to innings forfeitures for the first time in Test history, England staged a successful chase to win by two wickets with five balls to spare in Centurion. But the match was later discredited by the revelation that Cronje received money from bookmaker Marlon Aronstam in order to instigate a positive result.

1972
Two double-hundreds in his first four Tests and an average of 54, but Vinod Kambli, born today, didn't play a Test for India since 1995. Why? Well, he had his share of disciplinary problems for one, those double-hundreds came against Zimbabwe and England (circa '93), and two years later he made three ducks in six innings against West Indies. As a schoolboy he added a staggering 664 for the third wicket with his mate Sachin Tendulkar, a partnership broken only when their team's benevolent coach decided to give someone else a go.

1961
The classic 1960-61 series took another twist when West Indies levelled things with a big victory over Australia in the third match, in Sydney. Their star turns were Garry Sobers, who cracked a majestic 168, wicketkeeper Gerry Alexander, who made the only first-class hundred of his career, and Lance Gibbs and Alf Valentine, who both took eight wickets in the match.

1999
A black day for a once-proud cricketing nation. West Indies were walloped by 351 runs in the fifth Test against South Africa, in Centurion, to complete a miserable whitewash, the first 0-5 defeat in their history. Only two men reached double figures in the first innings, and after Jonty Rhodes spanked a 95-ball hundred that included six sixes, West Indies subsided again.

1933
As the Adelaide Test lurched to a conclusion, the Australian board met and sent its now infamous cable to the MCC, accusing the English of "unsportsmanlike behaviour" and describing Bodyline as a "menace to the game". The board sent the cable normal rate, but newspapermen sent their copy marked urgent. The result was, the London papers were made aware of the cable before it was received by the MCC.

1998
Aravinda de Silva's dreamy form continued, helping clinch a Sri Lankan series win over Zimbabwe. He made an unbeaten 143 as they made 326 for 5 to seal the series 2-0. As well as being Sri Lanka's highest total to win a Test batting last, it was, astonishingly, de Silva's seventh hundred in eight Test innings at various grounds in Colombo.

1982
Only 17 wickets fell in the drawn fifth Test between England and India in Madras, which ended on this day. Keen to force the pace in a series that England were losing, Keith Fletcher became the first captain to win the toss and bowl in India. He soon regretted it as Gundappa Viswanath and Yashpal Sharma batted well into the third day in a partnership of 316. Then came the real fireworks. While his opening partner Graham Gooch laced 50 in 46 balls and 100 in 139, Chris Tavaré eked out 35 off a staggering 240 deliveries, in an innings that lasted over five and a half hours. In the second innings every Englishman got a bowl - except Paul Allott, ironically enough, with Gooch keeping wicket for the last 12 overs and Bob Taylor turning his arm over.

1977
Pakistan's first Test victory in Australia. They had their new-ball pair of Imran Khan and Sarfraz Nawaz, who shared 18 wickets, to thank. Imran took 12 of those 18, and Asif Iqbal made a crucial 120. Pakistan were left needing only 32 to level the series in what was the final Test, and got there with eight wickets left.

1998
Record-breaking stuff from the Indians in Dhaka, in the Independence Cup final. With Sourav Ganguly hammering 124 and Robin Singh 82, they made 316 for 7 to beat Pakistan with one ball to spare, the highest total at the time to win a one-dayer batting second.

1998
South Africa sealed a thumping seven-wicket win against Australia in the one-dayer in Perth, with a massive 22 overs to spare - their fifth in a run of six straight wins against the Aussies. The sixth came five days later in the first final of the tournament, but led to a run of four without a win: the remaining two finals, the Waugh/Gibbs World Cup match at Headingley, and the famous, agonising semi-final tie at Edgbaston.

1994
Before he mangled proverbs, Navjot Sidhu butchered spin bowlers. Good ones too. Here he flayed eight sixes - just two short of Wally Hammond's Test record (though Wasim Akram moved the bar up to 12 two years later) - off a Sri Lankan attack that included Muttiah Muralitharan (41.5-3-162-5: even in the maelstrom he picked up a five-for). Sidhu's 124 and a record-breaking 142 from Sachin Tendulkar (it made him the first man to hit seven Test tons before his 21st birthday) set up India's innings victory over Sri Lanka in Lucknow. Anil Kumble, with 11 for 128, finished the job.

Other birthdays
1849 Edmund Barton (Australia)
1894 Leslie Walcott (West Indies)
1916 Alec Coxon (England)
1988 Sajidul Islam (Bangladesh)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:11 am

January 19 down the years

Arthur Morris: the first man to make a century in both innings of his first-class debut


1922
An Invincible run machine is born. At the age of 18 Arthur Morris was the first man to make a century in both innings of his first-class debut, and so it wasn't a great surprise that he made three hundreds in his first four Tests against England in 1946-47. He also hammered a glorious 182 when the Aussie Invincibles chased 404 for 3 to beat England at Headingley in 1948, adding 301 with Don Bradman. But he was vulnerable to Alec Bedser, who dismissed him 18 times, a Test record until Glenn McGrath went one better with Mike Atherton in 2001.

2004
The tragically premature death of David Hookes at the age of 48 occurred as a result of a scuffle outside a Melbourne hotel. The often outspoken Hookes was extremely popular, and an outpouring of grief followed the news. As a player he promised much - his Test career started with a spectacular assault on Tony Grieg that produced five successive fours during the Centenary Test in 1977 - but he ultimately disappointed on the international stage, although he was a major figure at state level. A blunt-talking commentator on the game, he was just establishing himself as a coach at the time of his death.

2008
A breakthrough at the WACA. India bounced back from the aftermath of the Sydney Test with a resounding 72-run win in Perth, in the process denying Australia a consecutive 17th Test win for the second time in the decade - the first was in Kolkata in 2001. It was a collective effort: there were no centuries or five-fors. Among the highlights were captain Anil Kumble's 600th wicket - on the second day - and the mesmeric spell Ishant Sharma bowled on the final day. The lanky teenager made Ricky Ponting, look like an amateur.

1930
Birth of the only South African to play 50 Tests before their isolation from international cricket. Though a fairly low-profile character, John Waite was a top-drawer wicketkeeper-batsman who made four Test centuries and averaged over 30. He batted everywhere from No. 2 to No. 9, and his first Test ton, at Old Trafford in 1955, was especially important: it came after a middle-order collapse and set up South Africa for a crucial three-wicket victory.

1977
John Lever and Derek Underwood (match figures: 31-16-44-6) bowled England to a 200-run victory over India in Madras, giving them a 3-0 lead with two to play and clinching their first series win in India for 43 years. India were skittled for 83 in their second innings, at the time the lowest score in a Test in India.

1999
A magnificent match-winning century from Chris Cairns brought applause from everyone in Christchurch - except his Indian opponents. They were convinced he was caught behind on 51 but Cairns carried on to flay 115 off 80 balls, including seven fours and seven sixes.

1807
Alfred Mynn - the "Lion of Kent" - born this day, was to the first half of the 19th century what WG Grace was to the second half. Standing over six feet and weighing in excess of 18 stone, Mynn was a fast roundarm bowler who generated fearsome pace off a four- or five-pace run-up. In 1838 he beat James Dearman in a single-wicket competition for the unofficial Championship of England, and eight years later he defeated Fuller Pilch for the same title in what is considered to be the last of the great single-wicket matches.

1996
England's increasingly disastrous 1995-96 tour took a further twist when they failed to chase a mere 130 to beat South Africa in the sixth one-dayer in East London. They were a bit unlucky, though - Graeme Hick was leading them to victory when he was sawn off, sparking a collapse from 75 to 3 to 115 all out. It was grim stuff: Jack Russell, in at No. 5, made 12 off 68 balls. England eventually lost the series 6-1, and in the World Cup that followed, failed to win a single match against Test-playing opposition.

1980
Michael Vandort, born on this day, made his Test debut in 2001 but the Jayasuriya-Atapattu opening combination kept him out of the side and he got his next Test in 2002, against Bangladesh, whereupon he scored a century. He then had to wait three and a half years for another chance and impressed with a hundred at Edgbaston. He scored another hundred against England when they toured Sri Lanka in 2007. However, with Tillakaratne Dilshan establishing himself as a Test opener, along with Tharanga Paranavitana, Vandort found himself on the sidelines again.

1969
Pity poor Pakistani Mahmood Hamid, who was born today. He played just a single one-day international for his country, against Sri Lanka at Sharjah in 1994-95, in which he was run out for 1. The man at the other end? That great athlete Inzamam-ul-Haq.

2014
After a 5-0 whitewash in the Test series, Australia wrapped up their second consecutive ODI series victory over England in the minimum three matches with a seven-wicket win in Sydney. Aaron Finch and James Faulkner produced match-winning innings in the first two games before David Warner and Shaun Marsh sealed the series win with a controlled 78-run partnership.

Other birthdays
1868 Bob McLeod (Australia)
1937 Lesley Clifford (England)
1957 Jane Powell (England)
1957 Jill Powell (England)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:16 am

January 20 down the years

Frog in a blender

Paul Adams is born. And an Englishman takes three in three for the first time


Paul Adams took 134 wickets in 45 Tests


1977
Birth of the unorthodox South African spinner Paul Adams (and he probably came out with his limbs flailing all over the place). He was famously described as having an action like "a frog in a blender" after he bamboozled England in a tour match in 1995-96, and soon became South Africa's youngest Test cricketer. But the Aussies neutralised him a year later and he never really recovered. A realisation that underneath his unconventional action was a bowler with little variety meant a marked decrease in his effectiveness, even on helpful wickets. He retired from first-class cricket in 2008 and moved into coaching.

1883
The first Test hat-trick by an Englishman. Round-arm offspinner Billy Bates was the man, dismissing Australia's Percy McDonnell and two Georges, Giffen and Bonnor, with consecutive deliveries. England went on to win the match, at the MCG, by an innings and 27 runs, the first innings victory in a Test. They had Bates to thank: he took seven wickets in each innings, and had the remarkable match figures of 59.2-28-102-14, seven of which were out bowled.

1980
A monumental effort from Sunil Gavaskar and Kapil Dev gave India their first series victory over Pakistan for 27 years. In the fifth Test, in Madras, Gavaskar batted seven minutes short of ten hours for 166, while Kapil added a thumping 84 to match figures of 11 for 136. India romped home by ten wickets to take an unassailable 2-0 lead with one to play.

1967
The Test debut of one Michael John Procter. He soon found his range too, taking 3 for 27 and 4 for 71 as South Africa comfortably won the third Test against Australia in Durban by eight wickets. But the political situation in South Africa restricted him to seven caps, in which time he amassed 41 wickets at a sensational average of 15.02. He went on to have a long, successful career with Gloucestershire, and ended with 1417 first-class wickets at an average of 19.

1968
Birth of the first Grenadian to play Test cricket. Junior Murray was better than most of the would-be successors to Jeff Dujon, especially with the bat - he once hit an 88-ball Test hundred, against New Zealand in Wellington in 1994-95, and was picked without the gloves as a Test opener - but he only played two Tests for West Indies, against India in 2002, after Ridley Jacobs took over the wicketkeeping duties with success in South Africa in 1998-99.

1908
Birth of a rare breed - a Scottish legspinner. Ian Peebles was born in Aberdeen but played for Oxford University, Middlesex, and then for England in 13 Tests between 1927 and 1931. He famously dismissed Don Bradman for 14 at Old Trafford in 1930 after giving him what the Wisden Almanack described as "a most unhappy experience". Peebles later became cricket correspondent of the Sunday Times, before he died in Buckinghamshire in 1980.

2014
Pakistan made 302 - the fastest chase of a 300-plus total - in 57.3 overs to win the Sharjah Test and draw the series 1-1 with Sri Lanka, who, in trying to protect their series lead, played out the first four days and a session of the fifth at a crawl (they scored 19 runs in the final 16. 4 overs of their second innings). Azhar Ali and Sarfraz Ahmed injected urgency into the proceedings on day five, aided by Misbah-ul-Haq, as Pakistan stormed along at 5.25 an over. Sri Lanka had won the second Test, in Dubai, comprehensively by nine wickets, bowling Pakistan out cheaply for 165 in the first innings.

Other birthdays
1911 Cyril Merry (West Indies)
1973 Leonie Hoitink (Netherlands)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:22 am

January 21 down the years

When David Gower buzzed a cricket field in a Tiger Moth


Get on board: David Gower and John Morris were penalised £1000 each


1991
On the third day of England's tour match against Queensland, David Gower and John Morris hired a Tiger Moth and buzzed the Carrara Oval, where Robin Smith had just returned to form with a hundred. But the dour England management didn't see the joke and the pair were fined. It could have been worse. Morris had intended dropping a water bomb from the plane.

1888
A Horseshoe is born. Australian opener Herbie Collins, a bookmaker by trade, was so nicknamed because of his good fortune, both in the gambling world and also in winning the toss. He played 19 Tests between 1920 and 1926, starting his career at the top level with scores of 70, 104, 64 and 162, all against England. He made two further hundreds, including a mighty 203 against South Africa in Johannesburg in 1921-22. He also captained Australia to a 4-1 win over England in 1924-25 - and to defeat in England 18 months later. He died in his native Sydney in 1959.

1964
A great spinner takes his Test bow. Mischievous Indian leggie Bhagwath Chandrasekhar took 242 wickets over a 15-year period, starting with 4 for 67 against England in Bombay. England had debutants of their own, including wicketkeeper JG Binks - surely the only Test player to be one initial away from a Star Wars character. The match was a draw, a fair effort from England, who lost Ken Barrington (with a fractured finger), Phil Sharpe, John Edrich and John Mortimore (all stomach disorders) before the match, and then Micky Stewart (with dysentery) at tea on the first day. Don Wilson (Yorkshire's perennial No. 9) ended up batting at No. 3.

1970
A not-so-great English legspinner who took 20 wickets from 15 Tests at 76.95 was born today. Ian Salisbury, so successful in county cricket, was found out at the highest level. He was famously mauled by Hansie Cronje after being recalled at Trent Bridge in 1998, but his nadir came in Pakistan in 2000-01. He took only one wicket in three Tests, the celebration of which prompted the Daily Telegraph's Michael Henderson to write, "It was as if a backward child had suddenly learned how to spell his name and deserved a treat".

1948
A startling 12 players made their debuts today in the first Test between West Indies and England. A few of them went by the wayside - remember Berkeley Gaskin? Or Winston Place? - but a few made names for themselves: this was also the debut of Clyde Walcott, Everton Weekes and Jim Laker. The match was drawn, but only after Laker - who bowled Walcott with his fourth ball - had put down a marker: he took 7 for 103 in the first innings.

1954
Controversial fare in Jamaica, where England were well beaten by West Indies in the last Test of George Headley's career. Headley bowed out with 16 and 1, out each time to Tony Lock, who was no-balled for throwing in the second innings. Worse still, the wife and son of umpire Perry Burke were attacked after he gave local hero John Holt out lbw for 94 in his first Test innings. And West Indies captain Jeff Stollmeyer was repeatedly booed for not enforcing the follow-on, a decision justified by his side's 140-run victory on the final day.

1865
Birth of the tragic Bill Brockwell, the England cricketer who spent his final 15 years homeless. A decent allrounder who played seven Tests between 1893 and 1899, he became penniless after retirement and despite an appeal in the Sporting Life, he was living rough when he died in Richmond, Surrey in 1935.

1956
The day England Test captain Mike "MJK" Smith played rugby union for his country. Sadly for him, Wales triumphed 8-3 at Twickenham, and that was that for Smith's career as a rugby international.

2000
A glimpse of the enormous potential of Abdul Razzaq. He followed up a lusty 52-ball 70 with figures of 5 for 48 as Pakistan beat India by 32 runs in the Carlton & United Series one-day match in Hobart. Razzaq went on to get the Player-of-the-Tournament award - but Australia bagged the big prize, beating Pakistan in the final.

Other birthdays
1957 Shaukat Dukanwala (UAE)
1960 Phil Horne (New Zealand)
1971 Chanderkanta Kaul (India)
1981 Jamie Dalrymple (England)
1981 Gavin Ewing (Zimbabwe)
1985 Riaz Afridi (Pakistan)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:26 am

January 22 down the years
Brief but brutal

Barry Richards' seven-week Test career


Barry Richards made the most of his four Tests, averaging 72.57


1970
The start of a potentially great Test career... but one that was finished within seven weeks. Barry Richards made his debut in the first Test against Australia in Cape Town, and warmed up with 29 and 32 as an awesome South African side romped home by 170 runs. He would end with a Test average of 72.57 from just four Tests. He wasn't the only debutant to be cut off before he reached his prime: middle-order batsman Lee Irvine, wicketkeeper Dennis Gamsy and left-arm spinner Grahame Chevalier all began similarly brief Test careers in this game.

1987
An Allan Lamb miracle. The Benson & Hedges one-day match in Sydney between England and Australia came down to this: 18 needed off the last over, three wickets left, Bruce Reid bowling to Lamb. Lamb didn't even need all six balls: he carved, chopped and smacked 2, 4, 6, 2 and 4, and England were home with one ball to spare. It was a once-in-a-lifetime-effort... except Lamb did it again, to Courtney Walsh in the World Cup nine months later.

1992
Another miracle, this time care of the Cat. Though England forced New Zealand to follow on, the first Test in Christchurch was going nowhere in the final session (so much so that even Robin Smith got to bowl the only four overs of his Test career). Then Phil Tufnell got to work, and New Zealand collapsed from 182 for 2. As a tense time-runs equation got tighter, Martin Crowe gambled and lost, holing out infamously to Derek Pringle (had it gone for four, the match would have been drawn) to give England victory. Tufnell ended with second-innings figures of 46.1-25-47-7, and this was his zenith - it gave him 23 wickets in three Tests, and each time he had bowled England to victory. A battle-hardened England side didn't get the credit they deserved for this one: it was only New Zealand's second home Test defeat in ten years.

1883
The first innings victory in Tests came in the second match of the 1883-84 Ashes. England squared the series at the MCG after offspinner Billy Bates took 14 for 102 (seven in each innings) to bowl Australia out for 114 and 153 in reply to England's 294.

1921
Birth of the man with the highest batting average in Test history. West Indian opener Andy Ganteaume played one Test - against England in Trinidad in 1947-48 - scored 112, and ended 12.06 runs per innings better off than Don Bradman. The reason he didn't play again? West Indies had a formidable batting line-up around this time: it was the era of Walcott, Worrell, Weekes, Sobers, Kanhai, Rae, Stollmeyer and Gomez.

1902
Agonising stuff for that great Australian left-hander Clem Hill, who was dismissed in the nineties for the third consecutive innings, in the third Test against England in Adelaide. Fresh from a 99 in Melbourne and a 98 in the first innnings, he was bowled by Gilbert Jessop for 97. His innings was a match-winner, though: Australia successfully chased 315 to win by four wickets.

1990
A first Test hundred for Wasim Akram, against Australia in Adelaide, and a blistering affair it was too. With Pakistan already 84 behind on first innings, and in disarray at 90 for 5, Akram slapped a glorious 123 in a match-saving partnership of 191 with his captain and mentor Imran Khan.

1988
An 18-year-old called Brian Lara made his first-class debut, for Trinidad and Tobago against the Leeward Islands. He made 14 and 22, out twice to veteran left-arm spinner Elquemedo Willett, but he soon found his range: in his next match he hit 92 against a Barbados attack that included Joel Garner and Malcolm Marshall. None of his team-mates made it to 50.

1988
Sixty-seven runs off the final five and a half overs, 57 of them elegantly dispatched by Carl Hooper, were decisive as West Indies beat India by 73 runs in Gwalior's first one-dayer. Hooper's unbeaten 113 came from just 97 balls and included 12 fours and two sixes, though he blotted his copybook a little when his two overs later disappeared for 27.

1980
West Indies took the first title in what went on to become an annual one-day triangular tournament in Australia, with victory over England in the second final in Sydney. It was all too easy. England, with their captain Mike Brearley coming in at No. 8, managed an under-par 208 for 8, and Gordon Greenidge and Viv Richards flashed West Indies to victory.

Other birthdays
1915 Tom Burtt (New Zealand)
1966 Nishantha Ranatunga (Sri Lanka)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:30 am

January 23 down the years
Glued to the wicket

Hanif Mohammad's 16-hour Barbados marathon


Hanif Mohammad's 337 was at the time the longest innings in first-class history


1958
Hanif Mohammad batted for 970 minutes (that's over 16 hours, or nearly 11 football matches) to save Pakistan's first Test against West Indies in Barbados. His 337 was at the time the second-highest score in Test history; it's now the eighth. It was also the longest innings in first-class history, until Rajeev Nayyar went 45 minutes better for Himachal Pradesh in the Ranji Trophy in 1999-2000. In Hanif's match, Pakistan had followed on, the small matter of 473 runs behind - they made 657 for 8 from a mere 319 overs.

2001
If you had told a West Indian cricket fan at the height of the team's supremacy in the mid-1980s that within 15 years they would be 31 for 8 - and then 91 all out - against Zimbabwe, you'd have been accused of having one rum too many. But that's what happened in an amazing one-dayer in Sydney. West Indies needed only 139 to win but that proved beyond them: only Jimmy Adams (22) and Nixon McLean (40) reached double figures; five of the batsmen were out for 0, including Brian Lara.

1999
More unpalatable fare, but for different reasons. Ross Emerson stirred a hornet's nest when he no-balled Muttiah Muralitharan for throwing in the World Series match against England in Adelaide. Arjuna Ranatunga led his team off the pitch for a while, and was later involved in an ugly exchange with his English counterpart Alec Stewart. Oh, and Darren Gough feigned a head-butt at Roshan Mahanama after he was obstructed. Shame about all the nonsense, as it obscured a cracking match - Graeme Hick's fine century was matched by Mahela Jayawardene's, and Sri Lanka, needing 303 to win, got home with one wicket and two balls to spare when Murali, of all people, hit the winning runs.

2015
A world-record sixth-wicket stand of 267 was set by New Zealand in the fifth ODI against Sri Lanka in Dunedin. New Zealand were in trouble at 93 for 5 in the 20th over when Luke Ronchi joined Grant Elliott, but the did not get another wicket. The two men sent New Zealand soaring to 360, their stand coming off only 180 balls. It was also the second-highest for any wicket for New Zealand. Ronchi was the most destructive, hitting 14 fours and nine sixes in his 99-ball knock 170. Sri Lanka, in reply, managed 15 less than what the pair scored together.

1971
Birth of the first Maori to make a Test hundred. Adam Parore made his Test debut as a 19-year-old at Edgbaston in 1990. A more-than-competent gloveman, and good enough to play 11 Tests as a specialist batsman in the Lee Germon years, he scored two Test centuries, the second in a famous eighth-wicket partnership of 253 with Nathan Astle in Perth in 2001-02, before the day-to-day grind of international cricket led to his retirement at 31.

1948
The day Don Bradman passed 200 for the 12th and final time in Tests. His 201 and Lindsay Hassett's 198 were the cornerstones of Australia's mammoth 674 - the third-highest total in a Test in Australia - in the fourth Test against India on an Adelaide shirtfront.

1952
Birth of South Africa's first non-white cricketer to play international cricket. Omar Henry had that honour at the World Cup in 1992, and later that same year he made his Test debut - at the age of 40 - against India in Durban. He was a fine left-arm spinner, and though his short international career was undistinguished, his first-class record (434 wickets at under 25 each) showed what might have been had he been able to play for his country in his prime.

1960
Birth of that meaty Australian batsman Greg Ritchie, who played 30 Tests between 1982 and 1987. He could give the ball a real belt, and played some fine innings: a century in his , an important 94 in a match-winning partnership of 212 with Allan Border at Lord's in 1985, and a patient 89 in the victory over New Zealand in Sydney the following winter. But it's a measure of just how poor Australia were around this time that Ritchie was on the winning side only four times.

1954
An Australian legspinner is born. Largely unheralded when he made his Test debut at 34, Trevor "Cracka" Hohns played a handy role in the Ashes-winning 1989 squad, chipping in with some useful wickets, notably Ian Botham's in the fourth Test, at Old Trafford, bowled for a duck as he missed a charging hoick. But ageing, innocuous spinners were ten-a-penny in Australian cricket in those days, and the selectors - whose ranks Hohns would later join - went back to the likes of Greg Matthews and the two Peters, Sleep and Taylor, before Shane Warne wobbled onto the scene a few years later.

1995
A great display from Fanie de Villiers as South Africa stomped all over an exasperatingly listless Pakistan in a one-off Test in Johannesburg. First, he flashed 66 off 68 balls, including three sixes, from No. 10 (this in a period of eight Test innings, spread over two years, in which he averaged 90), and then he tore Pakistan apart with 6 for 81 and 4 for 27. A 324-run victory margin said it all.

1996
A maiden Test hundred for Chris Cairns against Zimbabwe in Auckland, and he did it in style. It came off only 86 balls, and in all, his 120 included ten fours and nine sixes. Only Wasim Akram, Nathan Astle, Matthew Hayden and Wally Hammond have cleared the rope more often in a Test innings.

1946
Asif Masood, born today, was a Pakistan right-arm fast-medium bowler, hostile with the new ball and memorable for a bizarre start to his run-up, in which he turned sideways to the wickets and leaned backwards before starting his approach. He relied mainly on varying his angle of attack and an ability to swing and seam the ball. He made his Test debut against England in 1968-69, and was a fairly permanent member of the side over the next seven years, touring England and Australia (both twice). He played 16 Tests, with a best return of 5 for 111 at Edgbaston in 1971.

Other birthdays
1896 Alf Hall (South Africa)
1929 Ian Thomson (England)
1942 Laurie Mayne (Australia)
1953 Martin Kent (Australia)
1974 Glen Chapple (England)
1975 Paul Hitchcock (New Zealand)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:51 am

January 24 down the years
Patience is a virtue


Neil Harvey grinds South Africa down in Durban

Neil Harvey scored 151 in a match where only three players passed 50


1950
What comes next after these numbers: 311, 75, 99? The answer is 336 for 5; this being the sequence of scores in a remarkable Test in Durban that ended today. Australia won it, after South Africa declined to enforce the follow-on and were promptly whipped out for that 99. In a match where only three players made over 50, Neil Harvey won it with a remarkably patient 151 not out on a pitch that was turning square.

1983
Like father like son. Mudassar Nazar followed in the footsteps of his father, Nazar Mohammad, by carrying his bat in the fifth Test between Pakistan and India in Lahore (Saeed Anwar and Imran Farhat are the only other Pakistanis to have achieved the feat). Mudassar's 152, and 8 for 85 from Kapil Dev (including Majid Khan for a duck in his final Test innings) were the highlights of this rain-affected draw.

1970
Birth of the allrounder Neil Johnson, who was an integral part of Zimbabwe's side until he quit at the end of the tour to England in 2000. He lashed a match-winning 107 against Pakistan in Peshawar in his second Test, and also illuminated the 1999 World Cup with a fabulous hundred against Australia at Lord's. His right-arm seam-up didn't always cut the mustard at Test level, but he crucially dismissed Sachin Tendulkar on his debut, a tight win over India in Harare in 1998-99.

1981
Two days before his 27th birthday, Kim Hughes scored a career-best 213 - his only double - in Adelaide. Graeme Wood scored 125 and Australia gained a first-innings lead of 109 (the margin would have been bigger, if not for Sandeep Patil's superb, counter-attacking 174). Hughes scored 53 in the second innings and Australia declared on the final day looking to take the series in the second Test. They looked like they would get there when India fell to 103 for 6. But Yashpal Sharma (13 in nearly three hours) and Syed Kirmani hung grimly on to help India scrape to a draw in the last hour of the match.

2016
A maiden Big Bash League title win for Sydney Thunder. It was a remarkable rise for a team that had never finished outside the bottom two for the first four seasons. At the MCG, Kevin Pietersen's 74 took hosts Melbourne Stars to 176, and it was a tight finish as Thunder chased it in the final over. Usman Khawaja led the chase with 70, but Stars clawed back after his dismissal in the 14th over. Thunder clinched it with three wickets in hand. It was double delight for the western Sydney franchise as their women's team too took the title in the inaugural Women's BBL final earlier in the day.


1930
New Zealand's first Test hundred was scored by Stewie Dempster in their second Test, which they did well to draw against England in Wellington. Dempster scored 136 and added 276 with Jackie Mills (who too made a hundred: 117 on debut) for the first wicket - a New Zealand partnership record that remained unbroken for 42 years. New Zealand went on to make 440, bowl England out for 320, declare their second innings at 164 for 4 (Dempster unbeaten on 80), and take another four England wickets.

1999
An extraordinary one-dayer in East London, where West Indies beat South Africa by 43 runs. West Indies hammered 292 for 9 in their 50 overs, with 258 of those runs flayed by Shivnarine Chanderpaul (150) and Carl Hooper (108). Nobody else reached double figures, except Mr Extras. It was the only match West Indies won on this tour - they lost the other 11, including a 5-0 whitewash in the Tests.

1968
Australia won a thriller in Brisbane. India needed 395 to win the third Test and came mighty close - a century from ML Jaisimha to add to his first-innings 74 took them to 310 for 5 before Bob Cowper and John Gleeson brushed away the tail.

1872
The death at the age of 65 of William Web Ellis. His cricketing glory was limited to one first-class appearance - the Varsity match of 1827 - but by then he had guaranteed himself a place in sporting history as the father of rugby, when, during a game at Rugby school in 1823, he picked up the ball and ran.

1962
Twin tons from Hanif Mohammad, who batted for 894 minutes in the match, helped Pakistan save the second Test against England in Dacca. This was the start of a barren run for England: they didn't win a Test in Pakistan for 39 years and 19 matches, until Graham Thorpe's Chinese cut in Karachi in 2000-01.

Other birthdays
1891 Alex Kennedy (England)
1907 Denis Smith (England)
1912 Kenneth Weekes (West Indies)
1915 John Trim (West Indies)
1916 Victor Stollmeyer (West Indies)
1961 Sultan Zarawani (UAE)
1968 Mark Burmester (Zimbabwe)
1981 Humayun Farhat (Pakistan)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 3:56 am

January 25 down the years
Junior makes his mark

Mark Waugh replaced his brother Steve in the line-up and scored a century on debut

1991
More than five years after his twin brother Steve took his bow, Mark Waugh made his Test debut in the fourth Test between Australia and England, in Adelaide, coming into the side in place of Steve, who was dropped after a poor trot and broke the bittersweet news to his sibling. Waugh marked his debut with a stunning century, described in Wisden Cricket Monthly as "so sublime that sages battled to recall a better start to a Test career". The match was drawn, but only after England made a brave attempt to chase 472 to win, with Graham Gooch and Michael Atherton putting on 203 for the first wicket.

1957
In the third Test, at Kingsmead, Hugh Tayfield bowled 137 balls without conceding a run during England's first innings against South Africa. It remains the record for most consecutive dot-balls delivered.

1976
Another debut ton from another member of a famous cricket dynasty. Surinder Amarnath, son of Lala (who also made a hundred on debut) and brother of Mohinder, stroked 124 as India took a grip of the first Test against New Zealand in Auckland. India eventually won by eight wickets, benefiting from ignoring the "when in Rome" rhetoric: New Zealand pitches are supposed to favour seamers, but Bhagwath Chandrasekhar and Erapalli Prasanna twirled away here to share 19 wickets.

1952
The debut of one Richie Benaud in Sydney. He didn't have much to do as Australia hammered West Indies by 202 runs - he made 3 and 19 and took 1 for 14, bowling Alf Valentine. It was an odd game: on a perfect pitch, 19 wickets went down for 180 on the first day, with West Indies blown away for 78. Jeff Stollmeyer made a fine hundred in the second innings - no other West Indian passed 25 in the match - but Australia were always comfortable and sealed a 4-1 series win.

1879
The Grand Old Man of South African cricket is born. Arthur William "Dave" Nourse was born in Croydon, England, but went to South Africa as a 17-year-old and ended up making 45 consecutive Test appearances for them. A dogged left-hander and swing bowler, he made 15 Test fifties but only one hundred, 111 against Australia in Johannesburg in 1921-22. He played first-class cricket until he was 57, hence the nickname. His son, Dudley, also played 34 Tests for South Africa. He died in Port Elizabeth in 1948.

1985
Plucked from nowhere by Javed Miandad, and so green that he didn't have any bowling boots before the tour, the 18-year-old Wasim Akram made his debut today in the second Test between Pakistan and New Zealand, in Auckland. He failed to score a run, took 2 for 105, and Pakistan were trounced by an innings - but Wasim soon made his mark with ten wickets in the next Test, in Dunedin.

2014
India's lower order pulled off a thrilling ODI tie in Auckland to keep the series alive, after being seemingly out for the count - they needed 131 in the last 15 overs with four wickets in hand. Their magic man Ravindra Jadeja kept them in the game even when they were nine down and needed 29 from the last two. In the final over, with 18 to get, Jadeja hit two fours and a six, and got two runs from wides, but managed only a single off the final ball when two were needed.

2008
The day Adam Gilchrist went past Mark Boucher's world record of 413 Test dismissals, in the Adelaide Test. Gilchrist announced his retirement the next day, and finished his career with 416 dismissals. Boucher took the record back one month later.

1906
South African allrounder Denys Morkel, born today, bowled fast-medium awayswingers with an easy action and plenty of pace off the pitch. A fine driver on both sides of the wicket, he shone on his first overseas tour to England in 1929, scoring 321 runs in five Tests and taking 14 wickets. But having decided to move to England, he was unavailable to play the MCC in 1930-31. He did make South Africa's tour to Australia in 1931-32 but was a disappointment, mostly because of poor health. He set up a business in the motor trade in Nottingham, which became a flourishing concern.

1985
Birth of Lendl Simmons, nephew of Phil, and a West Indies opening batsman. Simmons scored a half-century in his second ODI in 2006, and got a game in the World Cup the next year. He got into the Test side in 2009 and starred for West Indies in the World T20 that year. However, his form waned thereafter, in every format, and he spent a year out before turning 2011 into a bumper year in one-dayers, with eight half-centuries and one hundred in 13 innings between April and December. He quit Tests in 2014 to focus on the shorter formats and has been a regular in various T20 leagues.

1929
A couple of Don Bradman masterclasses. On this day he smashed 340 not out for New South Wales against Victoria, an innings that included 38 fours. But though NSW racked up 713 for 6, it wasn't enough for victory.

1932
This one was, though. With the poor Victorians on the receiving end again, The Don slammed 167 in the second innings to set up a comfortable NSW win. For good measure, Bradman snapped up the last wicket.

1988
The birth of Cheteshwar Pujara, who succeeded Rahul Dravid at No. 3 for India in Tests, before which he scored a triple-century and two doubles in first-class cricket. A knee injury kept him out for much of 2011 but he celebrated his return with centuries against New Zealand, England and Australia, in the process becoming the joint-fastest Indian to 1000 Test runs in terms of Tests played. He struggled overseas through 2014 but regained his touch on the 2015 tour of Sri Lanka, carrying his bat with 145 in Colombo, in a match in which his colleagues failed. More heavy run-making followed in the 2016-17 home season, in which he scored centuries in three consecutive matches straddling Test series against New Zealand and England.

1986
A dashing Bangladeshi left-handed opener is born. Shahriar Nafees was thrust into the Test squad when he was just 19 but it was in 2006 that he exploded, against the might of Australia, stroking his way to a brilliant maiden hundred in Fatullah. Nafees was appointed vice-captain for the Champions Trophy later that year but his batting form slipped the following year and in 2008, he signed up for the ICL, He was recalled in January 2010, but despite some good knocks in the next two years, wasn't considered for a central contract in 2012.

Other birthdays
1867 Bill Storer (England)
1908 Hopper Levett (England)
1925 Eric Dempster (New Zealand)
1969 Tim de Leede (Netherlands)
1979 David Mutendera (Zimbabwe)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:02 am

January 26 down the years
The closest Test of all

An Australia-West Indies classic in Adelaide

A jubilant Courtney Walsh celebrates the narrowest of victories


1993
The tightest Test victory of all. A sensational finish in Adelaide, in which West Indies kept alive their 13-year unbeaten run in Test series with a one-run victory over Australia. It was one of the greatest Tests of all time. With the Aussies chasing 186, it looked all over at 74 for 7, and then - after a steadfast 54 from the debutant Justin Langer - at 144 for 9, but Tim May (42 not out) almost became a national hero in his first Test for four years. As record numbers watched on TV and the strains of "Waltzing Matilda" enveloped the ground, Craig McDermott was given out caught behind off Courtney Walsh by Darrell Hair, although to this day doubt remains as to whether McDermott actually gloved it. All this on Australia Day too.

1954
Birth of Kim Hughes, the Australian captain who resigned the job in tears. That and captaining the 1981 side that was vanquished by Ian Botham is what Hughes will be remembered for, which is harsh, as he was an outstanding batsman with a full complement of strokes. He lit up the Centenary Test at Lord's in 1980 with two blistering innings, not just batting on all five days but hitting a six on all five as well. He made a thrilling century in a low-scoring win over West Indies at the MCG in 1981-82, but a traumatic run against the same opponents in 1984-85 - nine Tests, no fifties, six runs in his last five innings - finished him off as a Test batsman, aged just 30.

1989
There have been some unlikely occurrences in Test history, but few to match the day Allan Border destroyed West Indies in Sydney - with the ball. He went into the match with 16 wickets in 100 Tests, and came out of it with 27 from 101 after returning the remarkable match figures of 11 for 96, including 7 for 46 on the first day. He dismissed everybody apart from Gordon Greenidge at least once, and then scored 75 off 330 balls, grinding out a big first-innings lead with David Boon (149). Australia won by seven wickets; it was a turning point for Border's boys: coming into the match on a run of six wins in 44 Tests, this kick-started a 12-game streak in which they won seven and lost none.

1962
Birth of offspinner Tim May, who formed a fearsome double act with Shane Warne between 1993 and 1995, when May had a second coming - starting with the Adelaide classic above. They played in 17 Tests together, and shared ten or more wickets in eight of those. May was dropped for the final time after taking only one wicket in the first three Ashes Tests of 1994-95. After retiring, May became the first CEO of the Australian Cricketers' Association, 1997, and the chief executive of the international players' body in 2005. He quit the FICA post eight years later, frustrated at the direction cricket administration was taking, particularly upset when the playing captains voted to oust him from the ICC cricket committee in favour of the TV commentator and former India legspinner L Sivaramakrishnan.

1963
Birth of Simon O'Donnell, the Australian allrounder who overcame cancer in the middle of his career to have a very good run with Victoria and Australia. He was particularly effective in one-dayers - he played 87 of those, and was a regular in the 1987 World Cup-winning side - but played only six Tests. A devastating hitter, O'Donnell smeared the second-fastest fifty in one-day history, off 18 balls against Sri Lanka in Sharjah in 1989-90. In all, his 74 took 29 balls and included six sixes. His offcutters were also very handy, and he took 5 for 13 when New Zealand were bowled out for 94 in Christchurch in 1989-90.

1957
Birth of the Indian offspinner who didn't really spin it. Shivlal Yadav had a memorable five days in Sydney in 1985-86, returning match figures of 95.3-43-118-8, as Australia held on grimly (and it was grim - Greg Ritchie's 17 took 157 balls) for a draw. In 2014, when the Supreme Court ordered BCCI president N Srinivasan to step aside while investigations were conducted into corrupt practices in the IPL, Yadav was appointed as interim president.

2016
Fast bowler Kagiso Rabada took the second-best match figures by a South African - 13 for 144 - in an emphatic win in Centurion against England, though the visitors won the series 2-1. It was South Africa's first Test win in ten matches, but the convincing nature of the victory indicated that their second consecutive series defeat was not cause for unmitigated gloom. Opener Stephen Cook, at 33, became the oldest South African to score a century on debut; Hashim Amla made his second hundred of the series and Quinton de Kock his maiden one before Rabada took a career-best seven-for to carve out a significant lead. On the final day, with England 52 for 3 chasing 382, Rabada picked up four wickets in 4.4 overs to bowl them out for 101.

1968
New Zealand's Chris Pringle, born today, had one of the most remarkable introductions into international cricket. After one season of first-class cricket in the Shell Trophy - totalling six matches - Pringle was playing club cricket in England when he ambled over to the New Zealand side during a practice session at Headingley and asked if anyone had a spare ticket for the forthcoming ODI. New Zealand were suffering an injury crisis at the time and Pringle, who was drafted in, went on to play two of the matches. His other claim to fame was that he took 7 for 52 to bowl Pakistan out in Faisalabad in 1990-91. In all, he took 11 for 152 in the match, in sharp contrast to 19 wickets at 65 in the other 13 Tests he played. Pringle later admitted to tampering with the ball because he was sure Pakistan were doing it.

1954
Left-arm spinner Diana Edulji, born today, played 20 Tests and 34 ODIs for India between 1976 and 1993. In her second Test, against West Indies in Chennai, she scored an unbeaten 57 batting at No. 9. Her best Test performance was against Australia: 6 for 64 in a drawn Test in Delhi. She played three World Cups, with her best ODI figures, 4 for 12, coming against England in a three-run loss in the 1993 edition. She became a selector for the Indian women's team after retirement.

1982
Birth of wicketkeeper-batsman Ashish Bagai, who made his debut for Canada at 17. He was a key member of the side that finished third in the 2001 ICC Trophy, thus gaining a place at the 2003 World Cup. In the World Cricket League in Nairobi in early 2007 he scored 137 not out against Scotland - his first hundred in senior cricket. In 2009 he accepted a full-time contract with Cricket Canada and was named captain again after a period of uncertainty over his availability. He stepped down from the post after the 2011 World Cup, and retired two years later after Canada failed to qualify for the 2014 World T20.

Other birthdays
1862 Philip Hutchinson (South Africa)
1903 Geoffrey Legge (England)
1919 Khanmohammad Ibrahim (India)
1957 Ashok Malhotra (India)
1962 Roshan Guneratne (Sri Lanka)
1969 Ishwar Maraj (Canada)
1974 Saman Jayantha (Sri Lanka)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:06 am

January 26 down the years
The closest Test of all

An Australia-West Indies classic in Adelaide

A jubilant Courtney Walsh celebrates the narrowest of victories


1993
The tightest Test victory of all. A sensational finish in Adelaide, in which West Indies kept alive their 13-year unbeaten run in Test series with a one-run victory over Australia. It was one of the greatest Tests of all time. With the Aussies chasing 186, it looked all over at 74 for 7, and then - after a steadfast 54 from the debutant Justin Langer - at 144 for 9, but Tim May (42 not out) almost became a national hero in his first Test for four years. As record numbers watched on TV and the strains of "Waltzing Matilda" enveloped the ground, Craig McDermott was given out caught behind off Courtney Walsh by Darrell Hair, although to this day doubt remains as to whether McDermott actually gloved it. All this on Australia Day too.

1954
Birth of Kim Hughes, the Australian captain who resigned the job in tears. That and captaining the 1981 side that was vanquished by Ian Botham is what Hughes will be remembered for, which is harsh, as he was an outstanding batsman with a full complement of strokes. He lit up the Centenary Test at Lord's in 1980 with two blistering innings, not just batting on all five days but hitting a six on all five as well. He made a thrilling century in a low-scoring win over West Indies at the MCG in 1981-82, but a traumatic run against the same opponents in 1984-85 - nine Tests, no fifties, six runs in his last five innings - finished him off as a Test batsman, aged just 30.

1989
There have been some unlikely occurrences in Test history, but few to match the day Allan Border destroyed West Indies in Sydney - with the ball. He went into the match with 16 wickets in 100 Tests, and came out of it with 27 from 101 after returning the remarkable match figures of 11 for 96, including 7 for 46 on the first day. He dismissed everybody apart from Gordon Greenidge at least once, and then scored 75 off 330 balls, grinding out a big first-innings lead with David Boon (149). Australia won by seven wickets; it was a turning point for Border's boys: coming into the match on a run of six wins in 44 Tests, this kick-started a 12-game streak in which they won seven and lost none.

1962
Birth of offspinner Tim May, who formed a fearsome double act with Shane Warne between 1993 and 1995, when May had a second coming - starting with the Adelaide classic above. They played in 17 Tests together, and shared ten or more wickets in eight of those. May was dropped for the final time after taking only one wicket in the first three Ashes Tests of 1994-95. After retiring, May became the first CEO of the Australian Cricketers' Association, 1997, and the chief executive of the international players' body in 2005. He quit the FICA post eight years later, frustrated at the direction cricket administration was taking, particularly upset when the playing captains voted to oust him from the ICC cricket committee in favour of the TV commentator and former India legspinner L Sivaramakrishnan.

1963
Birth of Simon O'Donnell, the Australian allrounder who overcame cancer in the middle of his career to have a very good run with Victoria and Australia. He was particularly effective in one-dayers - he played 87 of those, and was a regular in the 1987 World Cup-winning side - but played only six Tests. A devastating hitter, O'Donnell smeared the second-fastest fifty in one-day history, off 18 balls against Sri Lanka in Sharjah in 1989-90. In all, his 74 took 29 balls and included six sixes. His offcutters were also very handy, and he took 5 for 13 when New Zealand were bowled out for 94 in Christchurch in 1989-90.

1957
Birth of the Indian offspinner who didn't really spin it. Shivlal Yadav had a memorable five days in Sydney in 1985-86, returning match figures of 95.3-43-118-8, as Australia held on grimly (and it was grim - Greg Ritchie's 17 took 157 balls) for a draw. In 2014, when the Supreme Court ordered BCCI president N Srinivasan to step aside while investigations were conducted into corrupt practices in the IPL, Yadav was appointed as interim president.

2016
Fast bowler Kagiso Rabada took the second-best match figures by a South African - 13 for 144 - in an emphatic win in Centurion against England, though the visitors won the series 2-1. It was South Africa's first Test win in ten matches, but the convincing nature of the victory indicated that their second consecutive series defeat was not cause for unmitigated gloom. Opener Stephen Cook, at 33, became the oldest South African to score a century on debut; Hashim Amla made his second hundred of the series and Quinton de Kock his maiden one before Rabada took a career-best seven-for to carve out a significant lead. On the final day, with England 52 for 3 chasing 382, Rabada picked up four wickets in 4.4 overs to bowl them out for 101.

1968
New Zealand's Chris Pringle, born today, had one of the most remarkable introductions into international cricket. After one season of first-class cricket in the Shell Trophy - totalling six matches - Pringle was playing club cricket in England when he ambled over to the New Zealand side during a practice session at Headingley and asked if anyone had a spare ticket for the forthcoming ODI. New Zealand were suffering an injury crisis at the time and Pringle, who was drafted in, went on to play two of the matches. His other claim to fame was that he took 7 for 52 to bowl Pakistan out in Faisalabad in 1990-91. In all, he took 11 for 152 in the match, in sharp contrast to 19 wickets at 65 in the other 13 Tests he played. Pringle later admitted to tampering with the ball because he was sure Pakistan were doing it.

1954
Left-arm spinner Diana Edulji, born today, played 20 Tests and 34 ODIs for India between 1976 and 1993. In her second Test, against West Indies in Chennai, she scored an unbeaten 57 batting at No. 9. Her best Test performance was against Australia: 6 for 64 in a drawn Test in Delhi. She played three World Cups, with her best ODI figures, 4 for 12, coming against England in a three-run loss in the 1993 edition. She became a selector for the Indian women's team after retirement.

1982
Birth of wicketkeeper-batsman Ashish Bagai, who made his debut for Canada at 17. He was a key member of the side that finished third in the 2001 ICC Trophy, thus gaining a place at the 2003 World Cup. In the World Cricket League in Nairobi in early 2007 he scored 137 not out against Scotland - his first hundred in senior cricket. In 2009 he accepted a full-time contract with Cricket Canada and was named captain again after a period of uncertainty over his availability. He stepped down from the post after the 2011 World Cup, and retired two years later after Canada failed to qualify for the 2014 World T20.

Other birthdays
1862 Philip Hutchinson (South Africa)
1903 Geoffrey Legge (England)
1919 Khanmohammad Ibrahim (India)
1957 Ashok Malhotra (India)
1962 Roshan Guneratne (Sri Lanka)
1969 Ishwar Maraj (Canada)
1974 Saman Jayantha (Sri Lanka)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:10 am

January 27 down the years


A bespectacled New Zealand left-arm spinner is born
1979
The birth of New Zealand's best left-arm spinner. His scruffy, studenty appearance suggested the Italian-origin Daniel Vettori (his middle name is Luca) would have been better off studying sociology. But he could play: Nasser Hussain was his first first-class and Test victim, and Vettori became New Zealand's youngest cricketer at 18 years ten days, after only two first-class matches. He was the youngest spinner to 100 Test wickets (21 years 46 days) and got to 300 Test wickets in his 94th match. He could bat too, having scored six Test centuries. In 2007 he replaced Stephen Fleming as New Zealand's limited-overs captain, and then took on the role in all formats the next year. He led the side to the Champions Trophy final in 2009 and the World Cup semi-final in 2011 before stepping down from the post. He was plagued by injuries thereafter, an Achilles tendon condition keeping him out for long, but he managed to bow out of international cricket in a pretty special way: after playing in the 2015 World Cup final in Melbourne against Australia.

1991
The day David Gower played one of the most reviled shots in modern English cricket history. With Australia having set a none-too-subtle trap, Gower gently wafted the last ball before lunch down Merv Hughes' throat at deep square leg at a critical juncture of the fourth Test against Australia in Adelaide. His partner and captain Graham Gooch - already less than enamoured with Gower after the Tiger Moth incident - ignored him as the players left the field. Only Mike Gatting's reverse sweep and Mark Ramprakash's charge and heave at Shane Warne in 2001 can compare for vilification.

1981
A bad day for Robin Jackman, the England seamer who was born in India but spent many years playing cricket in South Africa, where his wife was born. He was served with a deportation order by the Guyanese government when England arrived for the second Test in Guyana. England backed their man and the Test was cancelled, but Jackman made his debut in the next Test, in Barbados.

1974
A forgotten man is born. Chaminda Vaas was overshadowed by Muttiah Muralitharan's success, but he was a crucial part of Sri Lanka's side. A brisk, clever left-armer with the ability to cut and swing the ball both ways, he turned in some outstanding performances: 10 for 90 to give Sri Lanka their first overseas win in 32 Tests, in Napier in 1994-95, 6 for 58 in the victory over Australia in Kandy in 1999-2000, and 14 for 191 against West Indies in Colombo. And he has the greatest one-day figures of all time: 8 for 19 against Zimbabwe in Colombo. After retirement, Vaas was appointed Sri Lanka's bowling coach.

1970
Birth of Dean Headley, the grandson of the great George and son of the West Indian Test player Ron. Playing for England, Headley generally saved his best for the old enemy: his back-to-back performances in Melbourne, where he bowled England to a famous win, and Sydney (his figures were 6-60, 4-62, 4-60) were truly heroic. As well as taking three hat-tricks for Kent in 1996, he ended with 60 Test wickets at 27, and a strike rate of 50.40 balls per wicket - lower than those of Hadlee, Garner, Holding, Akram, Lillee, Imran, Ambrose - but retired at the age of 30 with a persistent back injury.

1969
After an impressive Test debut against India in Auckland in 1990, Shane Thomson, who was born today, was touted as a real prospect. But his offspinners were fairly innocuous at the highest level and he never really delivered in a seven-year, 19-Test career. His finest hour was the thrilling unbeaten 120 in a memorable run-chase against Pakistan in Christchurch in 1993-94. Dropped after the 1996 World Cup, he retired from first-class cricket in 1997, aged just 28.

1964
Vintage stuff from Eddie Barlow and Graeme Pollock, whose partnership of 341 today in Adelaide remained South Africa's highest for any wicket in Tests for nearly 40 years, till Herschelle Gibbs and Graeme Smith broke it. Barlow hit 201 and Pollock, at the age of 19, a glorious 175. With Barlow chipping in with 3 for 6 in the second innings, South Africa won this fourth Test by ten wickets to square, and ultimately draw, the series.

1976
An early blast from the master, Viv Richards. His 101 was not enough to stop Australia crushing West Indies in this fifth Test, in Adelaide - this was the series where West Indies were routed 5-1 - but it was a marker nonetheless for an amazing year: in 1976 Richards made a staggering 1710 runs, a record for a calendar year till Mohammad Yousuf broke it in 2006. Less fortunate in this game was Keith Boyce, who got from 65 to 95 with last man Lance Gibbs for company before Gibbs was bowled by Gary Gilmour. It was the closest Boyce got to a Test hundred.

1998
After losing five times to South Africa in the league phase of the Carlton & United Series, Australia beat them 2-1 in the finals. In the third final, in Sydney, they defended a total of 247 despite some lower-order biffing by Lance Klusener. There must have been some nerves in the South African side going by the three run-outs and a hit-wicket.

Other birthdays
1911 George Pope (England)
1950 Milton Pydanna (West Indies)

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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:14 am

January 28 down the years
Monty comes around

A great Australian allrounder is born

Monty Noble: captained Australia to successive Ashes wins


1873
Arguably Australia's greatest allrounder is born. Keith Miller may have had something to say on the subject, but Monty Noble's record is certainly comparable. A classical right-hand batsman and an offspinner who could bowl pretty quickly, Noble also captained Australia to successive Ashes wins in 1907-08 and 1909. He took 7 for 17 and 6 for 60 when the Aussies beat England at the MCG in 1901-02, and took 11 for 103 to win Sheffield's only Test, in 1902. And in 51 Sheffield Shield matches he averaged 68 with the bat and 22 with the ball. He died in his native Sydney in 1940.

2012
A 4-0 clean sweep for Australia in Adelaide also doubled up as an eighth consecutive overseas Test defeat for India. Ricky Ponting and Michael Clarke scored double-hundreds - their combined score was just over 40 runs short of India's match aggregate - which took Australia to their second 600-plus total of the series. India were set a target of 500, which they failed to achieve. The two consolations for India: Virat Kohli scored his maiden Test hundred and it was the first Test of the series that went into the fifth day (though that had more to do with Clarke not enforcing the follow-on than any resistance shown by the Indian batsmen). For Australia, it was their first series whitewash against India since 1999-2000.

1887
An English nadir. In their rich Test history, England have never been dismissed for less than the 45 they managed today. Charlie Turner (6 for 15) and JJ Ferris (4 for 27) did the damage, both bowling unchanged throughout. Not bad when you consider they were both making their debuts. England were 29 for 8, but George Lohmann - the only man to reach double figures - made 17 to bring them to 45. This was an extraordinary match: nobody made a half-century, and despite their first-day disaster, England won when Australia fell 14 runs short of their target of 111. England's own new-ball pair of George Lohmann and Billy Barnes had combined match figures of 113.1-68-97-14. Four-ball overs or no four-ball overs, you can't argue with that.

2012
Another England low. Pakistan's spinners bowled them out for 72 in a chase of 145 in Abu Dhabi. England had struggled against Saeed Ajmal's offspin in the first Test, in Dubai, but they fared better here, and even gained a first-innings lead. And they had two spinners of their own - Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar, playing his first Test in two and a half years. Panesar thrived in the friendly conditions and his second-innings six-for gave England a modest target to chase. But another left-arm spinner refused to oblige - Abdur Rehman took a career-best 6 for 25, wrapping up the match in four days. Ajmal took seven in the match, his 19th Test, breaking Waqar Younis' national record to become the fastest Pakistani to 100 Test wickets.

1976
Erapalli Prasanna became India's most successful spinner, in a rare overseas win for India, against New Zealand in Auckland. Prasanna was 35 at the time, and Mihir Bose, writing about this tour, said: "On the plane taking him to New Zealand, Prasanna had suddenly felt old. A new generation of Indian cricketers was emerging and he felt like the last and forgotten remnant of a bygone age." But after a haul of 3 for 64 in the first innings, Prasanna took 8 for 76 in the second, setting up a memorable eight-wicket victory for India. On the way, he also went past Vinoo Mankad's 162 wickets, making him the No. 1 spinner in India's history. Bhagwath Chandrasekhar, Bishan Bedi, Anil Kumble and Harbhajan Singh would pass him later, but the numbers counted for little when the memories were this good.

2015
High drama in Brett Lee's final over in competitive cricket, bowled in the Big Bash final between Perth Scorchers and Sydney Sixers in Canberra. Scorchers needed eight from the last over and Michael Carberry got them seven runs from Lee's first three balls. Nathan Coulter-Nile was bowled off the fourth and Sam Whiteman off the fifth. With the scores tied, Lee bowled another full and fast ball: new man Yasir Arafat flicked it towards midwicket and dashed for a dangerous single. Standing over the stumps at the non-striker's end, Sixers' captain Moises Henriques, who had top-scored in the match with 77, dropped the on-the-bounce throw from midwicket and Scorchers won their second consecutive BBL title.

2017
Two years later, Perth Scorchers won their third Big Bash League title with an emphatic nine-wicket win over Sydney Sixers at the WACA. Mitchell Johnson started off proceedings by conceding only one run in the first over, and another 12 in his next three. Twenty-year-old fast bowler Jhye Richardson and 31-year-old medium-pacer Tim Bresnan took three wickets each. Scorchers chased down Sixers' 141 inside 16 overs.

1964
A rarity is born: a modern-day Englishman with the letters RF on his CV. David "Syd" Lawrence was most definitely fast, and as wholehearted as they come. He played five Tests before a horrible knee injury, marked by chilling cries of pain, in Wellington in 1991-92, wrecked his career. What is more easily forgotten is the crucial part Lawrence played in England's series-squaring victory over West Indies at The Oval in 1991. He took seven wickets, the same as Phil Tufnell but at two runs less cost. All anybody ever remembers, though, is Tufnell's first innings six-for.

1880
Birth of England wicketkeeper Bert Strudwick, who played 28 Tests at a time when excellence with the gloves was enough - witness a batting average of 7.93 and a top score of 24. And Strudwick was certainly accomplished with the gloves: until John Murray trumped him in 1975 he held the world record for most first-class dismissals in a career (1495). He was an extremely popular character: the story goes that, on one tour, a letter was sent to "Struddy, 'Stralia" and reached him without delay. Strudwick died in Sussex in 1970.

2013
Mumbai won their 40th Ranji Trophy title, at the Wankhede, when they beat Saurashtra, playing their first final since independence, by an innings and 125 runs inside three days. Seamers Dhawal Kulkarni (nine) and Ajit Agarkar (five) were chiefly responsible for bowling out Saurashtra for 148 and 82.

1949
Not content with five Test hundreds in a row, the great Everton Weekes was homing in on a sixth when he was contentiously run out for 90 in Madras today. West Indies thrashed India by an innings, and in the next match Weekes made 56 (to set a record of seven consecutive fifties that Andy Flower and Shivnarine Chanderpaul have since equalled) and 48. Patches don't come much purpler.

1989
A century for David Boon, whose patient 149 helped Australia to a surprise victory over West Indies in the fourth Test in Sydney...

1991
...and another century for Boon, this one against England in Adelaide. His 121 was his ninth Test hundred...

1992
... and the innings that finished against India today, again in Adelaide, was his 12th and the second of three in successive Tests, a feat he achieved twice. Boon's 135 also made him the first Australian to score five Test hundreds against India.

1997
When Danny Morrison, he of 24 Test ducks in 71 innings, strode to the crease in the afternoon session against England in Auckland today, New Zealand were 11 runs ahead with one second-innings wicket and 53.1 overs remaining. There could only be one outcome, right? Not when England are involved. Somehow Morrison survived 166 minutes, and with Nathan Astle making a century, the match was drawn. England fans felt like they'd been dragging their nails down a chalkboard for nearly three hours.

1906
Birth of the first New Zealander to be dismissed in a Test. Henry Foley played their inaugural Test, against England in Christchurch in 1929-30, and was out for 2 in both innings. He didn't play for his country again, and died in Brisbane, Australia in 1948, aged 42.

1986
Birth of promising young Pakistan batsman Asad Shafiq, who started his Test career with two half-centuries, in 2010. Not that it surprised those who knew him, since Shafiq had scored nearly 1000 runs in his maiden first-class season and over 1200 in his third. He scored his maiden Test hundred against Bangladesh in 2011. Against South Africa in 2013, coming in to bat at 33 for 4, Shafiq smashed 111 against an attack that included Dale Steyn, Vernon Philander and Morne Morkel. He had a prolific 2015, making hundreds against Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and England, and averaging 54.3 from eight Tests. But Shafiq will look back at 2016 with bittersweet memories: in Brisbane, Pakistan were chasing an improbable 490 and Shafiq, making 137 while herding the lower order, took them to 40 runs short of the target.


Other birthdays
1910 Hopper Read (England)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:20 am

January 29 down the years
A Sabina Park farce

Sixty-two ball match in Jamaica, and a record no other match can break

The pitch from hell


1998
One of the shortest Tests in history. The Jamaica match between England and West Indies lasted just 62 bone-crushing deliveries. England were 17 for 3 at the time - Alec Stewart was still there having made an imperious, unbeaten 9 - and their physio Wayne Morton had run out six times in 66 minutes. When Nasser Hussain came to the crease, Stewart apparently greeted him with the words: "It's Saturday, it's eight o'clock, it's the lottery." Thankfully England's number came up when the umpires, Steve Bucknor and Srinivas Venkataraghavan, courageously called off play because of the unsafe pitch.

2006
An extraordinary first day in the decisive third Test between Pakistan and India in Karachi. When Irfan Pathan grabbed a hat-trick in the very first over of the match, a stunned Pakistan slipped to 39 for 6 and there seemed no way back. But from the wreckage rose the wicketkeeper, Kamran Akmal. His brilliant counterattacking 113 was aided by cameos from Abdul Razzaq and Shoaib Akhtar, and four days later Pakistan had won a bizarre contest by a misleadingly vast 341-run margin.

1951
The poker-faced, almost docile demeanour of Andy Roberts, who was born today, hid the merciless soul of a great fast bowler. His stock bouncer, quick and nasty, was simply a softener, a prelude to the real thing, which was close to unplayable. Lithe and effortlessly economical in his run-up, Roberts did not benefit from coming into a great West Indies side (only one of his first seven five-fors came in victory). He famously blew India away in Jamaica in 1982-83 with three wickets in an over to allow Viv Richards to hammer West Indies to a victory target of 173 inside 26 overs.

1991
Violence flared during the Duleep Trophy final between North Zone and West Zone when the bowler, Rashid Patel, attacked the batsmen Raman Lamba and Ajay Jadeja with a stump. Jadeja was struck as he attempted to defend Lamba, and Lamba then had to use his bat as a shield when Patel chased him. The crowd then joined in, pelting stones onto the playing area. The match - a tedious, high-scoring affair - was abandoned and Patel escaped with a lenient 13-month ban. Lamba was banned for ten months.

1932
Birth of Raman Subba Row, who played 13 Tests for England between 1958 and 1961 and ended with the extremely healthy average of 46.85. He made three hundreds - including in his first and last Tests against Australia - and was out twice in the 90s as well. He also made a triple-century for Northants against Surrey, his old county. But at the end of 1961 he retired suddenly, for business reasons. Subba Row was later chairman of the TCCB and also went on to become an ICC match referee.

1971
One down with two to play, Australia let Dennis Keith Lillee off the leash for his Test debut, against England in Adelaide. He struck gold immediately, with a first-innings five-for, but England made 470 and bossed the game from there. Ray Illingworth chose not to enforce the follow-on, but Australia lost only three wickets in 115 (eight-ball) overs to secure a comfortable draw.

1931
Another Adelaide Test, and another great makes his Test debut. Australia released Bill "Tiger" O'Reilly, and though his four wickets played second fiddle to Clarrie Grimmett's 14 in this one, he went on to take 144 wickets in a brilliant 27-Test career. As for the match, Australia were comfortable ten-wicket winners, with Don Bradman left stranded on 299. The great man had nobody to blame, though: he ran out last man Pud Thurlow while looking for run No. 300.

2016
India Women created history by winning their first ever bilateral series against Australia in any format, taking the second T20 at the MCG. High on confidence after winning the first game, in Adelaide, by five wickets, India cleaned up the hosts by ten wickets, chasing 66 inside ten overs after rain intervened. Tight bowling and excellent fielding made the victory all the more comprehensive. They couldn't repeat the feat in the one-day series that followed, though, losing 1-2.


1995
Greg Blewett kicked off his Test career with a glorious century against England in Adelaide. But it so nearly turned into a farce: with Craig McDermott on his way back to the ground from hospital, Blewett had only fellow debutant and arch rabbit Peter McIntyre for company as he homed in on three figures. McIntyre played a blinder, though: his six-ball duck gave Blewett the chance to cut Angus Fraser for two to become the 16th Australian to make a hundred on debut. For good measure Blewett added another in the next Test, and a third in his third Ashes Test, at Edgbaston in 1997.

1992
More tasty Adelaide fare. This time Australia pipped India by 38 runs in a terrific fourth Test. India needed an unlikely 372 to win, but with Mohammad Azharuddin's revolving door working overtime, they almost got there. At 283 for 6, with Azharuddin and Manoj Prabhakar well set, a shock was on. But Craig McDermott returned to break the partnership and whipped away the tail to take his second five-for of the match. That wasn't the full story, though: 21 wickets fell on the first two days and then only one on the third, as a lively pitch flattened out into the definitive Adelaide shirtfront.

1969
Another Adelaide classic. Australia's last-wicket pair of Paul Sheahan and Alan Connolly survived the last 26 balls to grab a draw against West Indies, a prospect that had looked unlikely when the Aussies were 304 for 3 chasing 360 to win. But then the middle order was gutted by a series of run-outs (including Ian Redpath, backing up, by Charlie Griffith) and they had to hang on grimly. This in a runfest that produced 1864 runs - a record for Tests in Australia - though strangely nobody scored more than Basil Butcher's 118. There were 17 scores of 50 or more.

1966
Yet more Adelaide derring-do. Bob Simpson and Bill Lawry cracked an opening partnership of 244 against England to put Australia in charge of the fourth Test. They went on to win the match by an innings, despite scores of 60 and 102 from Ken Barrington, who made his ninth and tenth consecutive first-class fifties on the ground.

1996
A comfortable win and a 3-0 sweep for Australia in Adelaide, but the silver lining for Sri Lanka here was an empowering first Test hundred for Sanath Jayasuriya, and in the (then) unfamiliar role of opener too. (The two knocks in this match were the third and fourth times he had opened in a Test.) This Test was also the last of David Boon's career: he finished with 43 and 35. Oh, and Steve Waugh made 170 and 61 not out. Boon's average for the series? Just 362. For good measure, Waugh cleaned Sri Lanka up with 4 for 34 on the final day. No wonder Stuart Law, who replaced the injured Waugh in the first Test, couldn't get another sniff.

1993
The start of England's disastrous tour of India. Presented with a dustbowl in Calcutta, and with India making no secret of their plan to play three spinners, England coach Keith Fletcher settled on one spinner and four seamers. And what a quartet it was: the two Pauls, Jarvis and Taylor, Devon Malcolm and Chris Lewis. But there was nothing in it for them, and with Ian Salisbury labouring, England's best bowler was Graeme Hick (match figures: 5 for 28). They were never in the game once Mohammad Azharuddin laced 182, and India wrapped up an eight-wicket win on the last day.

1975
Set up by a rumbustious 242 not out from their captain, Clive Lloyd, West Indies beat India by 201 runs in the final Test in Bombay to take a thrilling series 3-2. Lance Gibbs took 7 for 98 in the first innings and Vanburn Holder 6 for 39 in the second. West Indies clinched the win in the afternoon session on the final day.

Other birthdays
1854 Vernon Royle (England)
1896 Teddy Hoad (West Indies)
1926 Bob Berry (England)
1958 Ole Mortensen (Denmark)
1970 Eric Gouka (Netherlands)
1972 Simon Cook (Australia)
1979 Mfuneko Ngam (South Africa)
1981 Kaushalya Weeraratne (Sri Lanka)

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:24 am

January 30 down the years
Curtly's seventh heaven

Ambrose blasts Australia off the WACA

Curtly Ambrose: 7 for 1 in 32 balls


1993
The winner-takes-all clash between Australia and West Indies was decided today in one extraordinary spell. Curtly Ambrose shoved Australia off the Perth trampoline with seven wickets for one run in 32 balls - from 85 for 2, they were 119 all out. West Indies closed the first day on 135 for 1, and that was effectively that. The match was over by lunch on the third day, with Ian Bishop taking six in the second innings. His haul included Allan Border, who bagged the only pair of his first-class career. The WACA groundsman was subsequently dismissed for preparing such a home away from home for Ambrose and friends.

1929
Birth of South Africa's greatest spin bowler. Hugh Tayfield was a master of flight and accuracy, and at times could be virtually unhittable. He was nicknamed "Toey" because of his peculiar habit of stubbing his toe into the ground before bowling. The highlight of his career was his 9 for 113 against England in Johannesburg in 1956-57, when he bowled throughout the last day, sending down 35 eight-ball overs to lead South Africa to a thrilling 17-run victory. That brought them back into the series at 1-2, and Tayfield squared it in the next one with a second-innings 6 for 78 as England fell 59 short of the 189 they needed for victory. He also equalled Bill Edrich's Test record of marrying five times. Tayfield died in Durban in 1994.

1883
The Ashes were returned to England in the form of a burnt bail in an urn. After losing in 1882 at The Oval - in the wake of which a mock obituary appeared in the Sporting Times - England went to Australia next season and won 2-1. Australia won the first Test and England took the second by an innings and 27 runs. In the third at the SCG, Fred Spofforth, the "Demon" from 1882, took seven in England's second innings, but the target of 153 was too much for Australia. England opener Dick Barlow took 7 for 40 as the hosts were bowled out for 83. It is widely believed that at the end of the series a group of Melbourne women gave England captain Ivo Bligh a small urn containing the ashes of a bail used in the third match.

1995
A trademark England 1990s Ashes victory. Trademark in that it was improbable, was achieved through high-class, high-octane cricket... and the series was dead. Going into the last day in Adelaide, England were effectively 154 for 6 in their second innings, but Phil DeFreitas slammed a sensational 88 off 95 balls, including 22 off one over from Craig McDermott. Then Devon Malcolm blew away the Australian top order, and after some nerve-jangling tail-end resistance, Chris Lewis and Malcolm wrapped up a famous win with 5.5 overs to spare.

1994
A memorable day for Kapil Dev, who equalled Sir Richard Hadlee's record of 431 Test wickets when he dismissed Don Anurasiri to wrap up India's innings victory over Sri Lanka in Bangalore. Nine days later Kapil moved above Hadlee when he snared Hashan Tillakaratne in Ahmedabad. Earlier in this match India had made 541 for 6 declared, the fifth successive home Test in which they had passed 500.

1990
Birth of left-arm seamer Mitchell Starc, one of the most promising young Australian quick bowlers. In his short international career Starc has been an especially potent wicket-taking option in ODIs, with three five-wicket hauls in his first 17 matches. His batting skills are pretty reasonable too - he fell just one short of a Test century in Mohali in 2013. He was at his best during the 2015 World Cup, finishing the joint-highest wicket-taker with 22 wickets and was named Man of the Tournament. After returning from ankle surgery, Starc was prolific in 2016, taking 50 wickets at 22.5 from eight Tests, including 11 in Galle, and 26 at 19.6 from 13 ODIs.


1942
A sanguine seamer is born. David Brown played 26 Tests for England between 1965 and 1969, and though his contributions were fairly understated - only two five-fors - his average (28.31) puts him just ahead of Harold Larwood and Ian Botham. He often found overseas conditions more to his liking, and took 5 for 63 - including three wickets in one eight-ball over with the second new ball - to set up England's innings victory in Sydney in 1965-66.

1853
The right place at the right time. Leland Hone's first-class experience was limited to two uneventful matches for MCC in 1878, but when Lord Harris found himself about to take an MCC side to Australia without a wicketkeeper, he called on Hone (himself only an occasional keeper). Hone's third first-class match was the Sydney Test, where he became the first man to play for England without having played for a county. There were five more outings - all for MCC - before Hone returned to Ireland, the country of his birth.

1988
Chris Broad found himself £500 out of pocket when he smashed down his stumps after being bowled by Steve Waugh in the Bicentennial Test, in Sydney. Broad had made 139, his fourth hundred in six Tests in Australia, but the tour management didn't take too kindly to his last shot - a withering pull that sent the stumps flying - and fined him. Wisden Cricket Monthly described it as a "pathetic display of pique".

1934
Already the only Australian to play Test cricket in his fifties, and the second-oldest Test player of all time, left-arm spinner Herbert "Dainty" Ironmonger played his last Sheffield Shield game today, at the age of 51 years, 298 days.

1985
Birth of Suraj Randiv, a Sri Lankan offie with no mystery balls. Randiv had a forgettable Test debut, going for 222 runs for two wickets in an SSC runathon against India, whose ire he faced a month later when he bowled a no-ball to deny Virender Sehwag a hundred at the end of an ODI in Dambulla. In between the two matches, he got nine wickets in the Test at the P Sara against the same opposition. He became Sri Lanka's second-choice spinner in Tests for a time, but slowly lost his place in the limited-overs sides.


Other birthdays
1913 Dickie Fuller (West Indies)
1943 June Stephenson (England)
1951 Trevor Laughlin (Australia)
1959 Alexander Morgan (West Indies)
1961 Ranjith Madurasinghe (Sri Lanka)
1964 Denise Annetts (Australia)
1967 Purnima Rau (India)
1974 Robert Rollins (England)
1977 Alison Hodgkinson (South Africa)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:28 am

January 31 down the years
Nailbiter in Chennai

Tendulkar and Saqlain star in an India-Pakistan classic

Sachin Tendulkar: a great innings in a losing cause.


1999
The first Test between Pakistan and India for nine years ended on this day in Chennai, and it was a classic. A see-saw game went this way and that, and when 18-year-old Shahid Afridi belted 141 to take Pakistan to 275 for 4 (a lead of 263), the tourists were in charge. Then Venkatesh Prasad took 5 for 0 in 18 balls and India were left to chase 271. They collapsed to 81 for 5 before Sachin Tendulkar, with a glorious 136, took them to 254 for 6 - just 17 away from victory. When Tendulkar holed out to Saqlain Mushtaq, the tail was swept away. Saqlain finished with ten wickets as Pakistan won by 12 runs.

2010
Forget bottle caps and sandpaper. Try biting the ball if you want to tamper with it, just like Shahid Afridi did in the fifth ODI against Australia in Perth. Afridi, leading Pakistan in the absence of Mohammad Yousuf, was caught by TV cameras apparently biting the ball on a couple of occasions. This was reported to the on-field umpires by the TV umpire, and after a chat with Afridi, the umpires changed the ball. He was banned for two T20s and Pakistan lost the series 5-0.

1995
Heads, tails or bird? This was the day Saleem Malik called the third when Andy Flower tossed up ahead of the first Test in Harare. The eagle adorns the Zimbabwean coin, and when it landed bird up, Malik happily announced he would bat. But the match referee, Jackie Hendriks, was having none of that: he ordered a rethrow, Malik called wrongly, Zimbabwe batted - and trounced Pakistan by an innings.

1954
Not many batsmen make 250 in a Test and finish averaging only 26, but Faoud Bacchus, who was born today, did precisely that. That 250 came in Kanpur in 1978-79, and he might have made more had he not slipped and hit his own wicket. But he also made seven ducks in 30 innings, and a couple of chaps called Greenidge and Haynes made getting back into the side virtually impossible. Bacchus played 19 Tests for West Indies in the late 1970s and early '80s, and returned 15 years later, at 43, to play ICC Trophy cricket for USA.

1934
Birth of probably the only man to hit Wes Hall for four off his first ball in Test cricket. Brian Bolus did just that in 1963, and acquitted himself commendably throughout his seven Tests over the next year, averaging in excess of 40. But in 1964, Geoff Boycott made his debut, and with John Edrich and Bob Barber also on the scene, Bolus couldn't get back in. He became the third man to be capped by three different counties (Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire), and later joined Ray Illingworth's selection committee in 1994.

1976
At 5.25 pm in Melbourne, Ian Redpath flipped that great West Indian offspinner Lance Gibbs into the hands of Michael Holding at long-off, and Fred Trueman's record of 307 Test wickets was broken. This was Gibbs' last Test - and Redpath's - and Gibbs took one more wicket to end with 309 at an average of 29.09. West Indies were thumped again to round off a 1-5 defeat; it was a landmark match: with Gibbs gone, they no longer had a world-class spinner, and could select four quick bowlers with a clear conscience - a policy that made them the best in the world for the next 20 years.

2017
Andre Russell of West Indies was banned for a year for repeated violations of a drug-testing clause in 2015. Russell was found to have not informed the anti-doping authorities of his whereabouts on January 1, July 1 and July 25 that year, despite several reminders.

1944
Birth of John Inverarity, the Australian who is best remembered for his role in England's famous Underwood-inspired, rain-defying victory at The Oval in 1968. Inverarity, opening, as it transpired, for the last time in Tests, batted throughout Australia's innings but was last out for a 253-ball 56 when he padded up to Underwood's arm ball. Inverarity was a dogged batsman (once dubbed "Inforeverarity") and a useful left-arm spinner. But he excelled as a captain - not of Australia but of Western Australia, whom he led to the Sheffield Shield four years in five. He also coached Kent, and David Fulton, in particular, was fulsome in his praise. In 2011, at the age of 67, Inverarity was appointed as a full-time national selector for Australia.

2002
West Indies' decision to withdraw from their tour to Pakistan in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks in USA gave Sharjah its first Test. Yousuf Youhana scored 146 and Rashid Latif 150 - his only international hundred. West Indies managed to avoid the follow-on but conceded a lead of 127. Nearing the end of day four, Pakistan set them a target of 342. West Indies looked like they would draw the match on the final day, reaching 146 for 3, before they lost their last seven wickets for 25 runs. Shoaib Akhtar took five and Abdul Razzaq four - including three in an over.

1977
When David Terbrugge, who was born today, began his Test career with nine wickets at 28 in the West Indian whitewash in 1998-99, it looked like South Africa had found a Fraser-esque seamer of the highest class. But Terbrugge was hit by a variety of injuries and never quite became a regular member of the side.

1988
Birth of the tubby Mohammad Shahzad, Afghanistan's wicketkeeper-batsman, who is inspired by MS Dhoni's style of batting, into which he injects a dose of crazy. However outlandish his shots look, they are effective. In his first 11 ODI innings, Shahzad made three hundreds and three fifties. He hit a 67-ball 118 - then the highest T20I score by an Associate batsman - against Zimbabwe in Sharjah in 2016, and was named the ICC's Associate and Affiliate Player that year.


Other birthdays
1858 William Moule (Australia)
1866 Henry Forster (England)
1889 Frank Foster (England)
1931 Billy Watson (Australia)
1946 Subrata Guha (India)


© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 4:30 am

Boy30

Do not read everything today because until January 31st you are all set

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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 16, 2017 9:23 am

We should go in Page 2 for February
Page 3 for march
Page 12 = December
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Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Jamesicus » Thu May 18, 2017 2:03 pm

What a great thread! I am a newcomer here so permit me to tell you a little about myself. I know it is much frowned upon to make duplicate posts, but I have great difficulty typing these days so I will mostly repeat what I posted in the Newcomer section of this Forum -- with some changes:

I am now on the cusp of being eighty eight years old and a lifetime cricket fanatic. Born and grew up in England but have lived in the USA for many years. My father was an avid follower of cricket and started taking me to mostly Lancashire League matches in 1938. I am somewhat of a "traitor" in that I have always been a "Baggy Green" fan -- why not, for Don Bradman (the supreme tormentor of England in the 1930s) is my all-time sports hero -- I saw the Don bat several times times (against Lancashire and Yorkshire and in test matches -- three great centuries to boot). Some of my favorite cricketers from the "old days":

Don Bradman
W. J. (Bill) O'Reilly
Sid Barnes
George Headly
V. J. Hazare
Ray Lindwall
Keith Miller
Wally Hammond
Len Hutton
Dennis Compton
L.E.G. Ames
Hedley Verity
Everton Weekes
Clyde Walcott
Cecil Pepper

Please excuse my posting errors -- I am a lousy typist, my memory is poor these days and I sometimes get events and dates mixed up. Other than that I do pretty good.

James
An old leg spin bowler

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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY see LANE

Postby Misty » Sat May 20, 2017 12:32 pm

Hello James,
A lifetime cricket Fanatic.I hope you are best of your health,i myself Misty, I was in England yesterday for 3 hours (traveling from India to USA) Good to see you at cricforum,cricket is my lifelong Passion since my Childhood.

I like your team above, especially Vijay in your team who bowled D.Bradman twice in Australia during test match, all others are great as well, except Cecil Pepper, he must be from England.keep posting, good to see you.
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Sun May 21, 2017 10:56 am

Cecil pepper too, who died in England @76 was Leg spinner, he never played test, under 2000 runs and under 200 FC wickets.


Full name Cecil George Pepper

Born September 15, 1916, Forbes, New South Wales

Died March 22, 1993, Littleborough, Lancashire, England (aged 76 years 188 days)

Major teams New South Wales

Batting style Right-hand bat

Bowling style Legbreak googly

Profile

Nobody who played Sheffield Shield or Lancashire League cricket against bulky Cec Pepper was ever likely to forget the experience. His powerhouse batting and brilliant legspin/ googly bowling were backed by a tireless stream of taunts and slick asides which scarcely abated during his years as an umpire in county cricket.


There can never have been a more rumbustious cricketer. And his effrontery, he always believed, cost him a Test career. Irked by three refusals by umpire Jack Scott to three appeals by Pepper against Don Bradman at Adelaide in 1945-46, young Sergeant Pepper let his mouth off. He later claimed that he sent an apology to the Australian Board, but the Board denied ever receiving it. `Pepp' was soon reasoning that England might be the best place. For the next 30-odd years he stamped his giant personality on the fields of Lancashire and then of the whole of England in his flamboyant umpiring attire.

Cecil George Pepper was born on Sept 15, 1918 in the mid-west NSW town of Forbes, and while still a teenager he scored 2834 runs (HS 251) and took 116 wickets for Parkes in one season. But it was tennis which took him to Sydney. Soon, though, he was making his mark with Petersham Cricket Club, where Sid Barnes, another rebel, helped him out with accommodation. By 1938-39 Pepper was a State player.

The last of his 16 matches for NSW was in 1940-41, and he averaged 27 with the bat, his highest score being a blazing 81 at the Gabba which included 74 runs in boundaries. His 57 wickets cost 33.89 apiece. He took 5 for 49 against South Australia (Bradman caught off him) at the start of 1940 and 6 for 57 (all top-order batsmen) against Queensland, also at the SCG, at the end of the year. Then off he went, in khaki, to serve his country in the Middle East and New Guinea.

He was a key member of the 1945 Australian Services team, and did well in the five-`Test' series in England and in India and Ceylon on the way home. Then, as the Servicemen displayed their skills on a grand farewell tour of their homeland, Cec `blew it' in that Adelaide match.

By then, England must have been expecting him to return with the first post-war Australian side. He had hit the winning runs, in an unbeaten 54 in the big match at Lord's, and roared to a century in 47 minutes in a one-dayer at High Wycombe. Keith Miller made a great impact in that first British summer of peace, but even he was topped by Pepper when he smashed Hollies over the houses and into Trafalgar Square at Scarborough. `Third chimney to the left of the gap,'`Pepp' would gladly confirm. That hit, in his career-highest 168, guaranteed some immortality for him, but more importantly it won him a precious bottle of whisky from wicketkeeper Arthur Wood, who teased him into the gargantuan hit. And his bat weighed no more than 2lb 4oz. He loved the stratospheric blow. He had already slugged a ball out of the Sydney Cricket Ground and into Kippax Lake.

While in India with the 1949-50 Commonwealth side, he returned his best first-class figures, 6 for 33 against Holkar at Indore, including the hat-trick. But he left that tour early, by mutual agreement with his captain, Jock Livingston. Cec found the umpiring wound him up too much.

It therefore amused his mates to see him don the white coat in 1964, to bestride the county grounds for 16 seasons, laughing and trading abuse with the players and bringing his own special brand of rough justice to the middle. He brought a new line in sartorial elegance to the trade, and a rare attitude towards the captains, who were so often cosseted: `I used to shoot'em out, no matter who!' He reluctantly observed the 1964 truce on chuckers, refraining from no-balling West Indian Charlie Griffith `because it was an exhibition match'. MCC's reply, condoning his reticence, left him feeling uneasy. Soon, a copy of his confidential letter and MCC's reply appeared in a national newspaper, having apparently been stolen from Pepper's briefcase.

In the end, he burst at what he saw as a never-ending coterie of favoured umpires on the Test panel, leaving the game in 1979, the dream of seeing him and Bill Alley umpiring an Ashes Test at Lord's unfulfilled.

As a league player, Cec Pepper was a colossus: with Rochdale, first to complete the double twice in the Central Lancashire League (and probably first to tweak the nose of an offending opposition club member on the pavilion steps); with Burnley's first double ever in the Lancashire League. He had begun with Nelson, and went on to Radcliffe, Oldham, Royton and Norton. Even though he once belted 38 runs off an eight-ball over, his personality is recalled ahead of his prodigious performances - though none who succumbed to his wicked `flipper' ball will ever forget it.

Stories of Pepper abound, particularly in Lancashire. Some were incorporated into Stephen Thorpe's articles on him in the Sept and Oct 1989 editions of WCM. Perhaps the best concerned his untypical apology to an umpire whose life he had been rendering almost intolerable. Cec urged him not to take it to heart. Not to worry, said the ump, for up here we like a chap to speak his mind. And to prove the point, the mild little chap answered Cec's next roar of appeal with: `Not out, you fat Australian bastard.'`Pepp' loved that.

He died, aged 76, in Littleborough, on March 22. He was born a rebel, which is different.
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Jamesicus » Sun May 21, 2017 4:17 pm

Great information Misty. I am going to include some information from a post I made in the "Introduce yourself" section of this Forum. Bear in mind that I am recollecting events of some sixty years or so ago and my memory is not as good as it used to be -- so please excuse any inaccuracies:

Cecil Pepper was a big, powerful and jovial man -- he was an entertaining hard hitting batsman and a great right hand leg spin bowler who could baffle the best batsman on his good days. I know that, because in 1949 he became the Burnley (Lancashire Leagu) Professional enjoying great success with both the bat and ball -- he was the first cricketer to hit 1000 runs and take 100 wickets in a Lancashire League season (Saturday one day matches). I used to love to stand by the sighting screens during matches at Burnley CC and watch him bowl -- he could completely baffle the amateur batsman with his amazing spin -- leg breaks, googlies, top spinners and flippers. And he hit some prodigious sixes -- the first batsman to hit a ball on the roof of the adjacent Burnley FC Turf Moor stand.

If I recall correctly, Hazare (Professional for Rawtenstall) also scored 1000 runs and took 100 wickets the same season as Pepper -- so they shared the first "double" honor.

I attended just about every Burnley CC Lancashire League home match from 1938 when my father (who was an enthusiastic cricket supporter) took me as a nine year old boy until I depaterd England in 1950. I earned spending money helping operate the scoreboard at Burnley CC during the 1948-1949 seasons when I was occasionally able to "rub elbows" with some international cricket legends (mostly Lancashire League Professionals) when I went to the Pavilion to get tea & sandwiches for the scoreboard crew (I volunteered for that duty) during the between-innings refreshment breaks -- I will post some of my recollections of those events later if you wish.

James

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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Jamesicus » Sun May 21, 2017 5:46 pm

Here is the link to the Wikipedia page for Pepper -- includes pic:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cec_Pepper

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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Tue May 23, 2017 1:11 am

Thaxs Gentleman
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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Wed May 31, 2017 10:09 pm

:lmao: :lolup: :lolup:
February 1 down the years

The birth of Biff

Graeme Smith: One of South Africa's finest leaders


1981
Birth of the first player to captain in 100 Tests. The selectors took a rather big gamble when, after a disastrous campaign in the 2003 World Cup, they handed the captaincy to an inexperienced 22-year old Graeme Smith - the youngest to take charge of South Africa. He soon impressed with back-to-back double-centuries on the 2003 tour of England. Defeats came the way of a team in transition, but Smith continued to score big at the top of the order. The thrill of chasing 434 in an ODI against Australia was muted by a 3-0 Test loss to Australia in 2006, and an embarrassing loss in the World Cup semi-final the next year. However, the 2-1 home win against India in 2006-07 kick-started a phenomenal run for the South African Test side under Smith. They conquered Pakistan, Bangladesh (he put on a record opening stand of 415 with Neil McKenzie in Chittagong) and England, and the icing on the cake was a historic series win in Australia late in 2008. More overseas wins piled up under his watch, and in 2012, after beating England 2-0, South Africa became the No. 1 Test side. That year they did not lose a single Test - beating Australia 1-0 too in a memorable away series. Smith retired from international cricket after a series defeat to Australia at home in 2014.

1981
A one-day final, and the opponents need six off the last ball just to tie. If you were an Australian, you'd back yourself to win, wouldn't you? Greg Chappell didn't. He was so scared of New Zealand's Brian McKechnie (one-day career: 54 runs in 14 matches) that he ordered his bowler - who just happened to be his brother, Trevor - to bowl the last ball underarm. It did the trick and Australia won the match, but they lost a lot of friends. The tactic caused much consternation and was quickly banned. Ian Chappell, brother of Trevor and Greg, was commentating at the time and said: "No Greg, you can't do that."

1961
Another thriller in the 1960-61 Australia-West Indies series. It was 1-1 with two to play going into the fourth Test, in Adelaide, and after back-to-back hundreds from Rohan Kanhai and a hat-trick from Lance Gibbs, Australia had to chase 460 or, more realistically, survive 120 (eight-ball) overs. Wickets fell steadily, and the last man Lindsay Kline (first-class average: 8) came to the crease with 100 minutes remaining. At the other end was Ken "Slasher" Mackay - the nickname was ironic - and he was the perfect man for the situation. With nails all over Australia bitten to the quick, the pair somehow survived and Australia lived to fight another day - which they did, winning the last Test to take the series.

1967
Although largely remembered as a brilliant captain who struggled with the bat at Test level, Mike Brearley was a much better batsman than that. Against North Zone in Peshawar, he hit 312 in 330 minutes as the MCC Under-25 XI ended the first day at 514 for 4. His third hundred took just 51 minutes, and in all, he struck 41 fours and three sixes.

1991
An inglorious English collapse. Already 0-2 down in the series, England looked to be salvaging some pride in the last Test in Perth when Allan Lamb and Robin Smith belted them to 191 for 2 just before tea on the first day. Then the roof caved in. Craig McDermott took a Test-best 8 for 97 and the tail was blown away - the last eight wickets went down for 53 on a true pitch. It was pitiful stuff. The second innings was even worse: only Smith and Phil Newport passed 25. Australia won by nine wickets, and for the first time since 1958-59, England had failed to win a match in a five-Test series in Australia.

1971
His star fell because of his alleged involvement in the match-fixing scandal, but Ajay Jadeja, who was born today, was one of the darlings of Indian cricket and even captained them in a handful of one-dayers. He played only 15 Tests, but featured in 196 one-dayers, and gave India crucial momentum in the taut World Cup quarter-final against Pakistan in 1996 with a rascally 25-ball 45, including 22 off one over from Waqar Younis. An impish hitter and a very good finisher, his medium pace was of the occasional variety, but he did take 3 for 3 in a one-dayer against England in Sharjah in 1998-99. He was, by a long way, one of India's best fielders in the 1990s.

1982
Shoaib Malik, who was born today, hardly had success as Pakistan captain - besides smashing the minnows and reaching the final of the ICC World T20 in 2007 - during his stint in charge. However, his adaptability made him a handy asset in the Pakistan set-up. He batted in every position in ODIs since his debut in 1999. He began at Test level batting in the lower order and was even used as an opener, and astonishingly proved an adept one. In 2010, Malik was banned for a year by the PCB on grounds of indiscipline. In typical Pakistan board style, it was overturned in two months. He was in and out of the limited-overs sides following the controversial tour to England that summer, but made a dramatic Test comeback in 2015, when he scored 245 against England in Abu Dhabi. He abruptly retired from the format at the end of the series to focus on the 2019 World Cup.

1985
Three Tests, three centuries: Mohammad Azharuddin's introduction to life at the top was just about perfect. Today, against England in Kanpur, he became the first batsman to make a century in each of his first three Tests. It was glorious stuff - his second fifty took only 38 balls - but it couldn't drive India to the victory they needed to square the series, and a very good year for England and their captain, David Gower - who would guide them to a 3-1 Ashes win - was underway.

1987
The birth of Moises Henriques, who in 2013 became just the second Portugal-born Test cricketer, and the first such to represent Australia. Henriques first captained New South Wales at 22, but he remained on the periphery of the national team, making more of a mark in domestic T20 leagues. He was part of the Sydney Sixers squad that won the inaugural Big Bash League in 2011-12, playing every match of the tournament and finishing as his side's second highest run-getter. He also played a pivotal role in the team's Champions League win in 2012, this time as their second highest wicket-taker. In due course, Henriques assumed the captaincy of Sixers and led them to the final in the 2016-17 BBL. He has also been an IPL regular, representing as many as five teams, and winning the tournament with Sunrisers Hyderabad in 2016.

1994
One down with one to play, but Australia had a new ingredient for the crucial third Test against South Africa in Adelaide: Steve Waugh. Having missed the first two games through injury, Waugh returned with 164 and 4 for 26, and though South Africa fought tooth and nail for a draw - despite a fractured thumb, nightwatchman Fanie de Villiers survived 197 minutes for 30 on the last day - Shane Warne and Craig McDermott wrapped them up in the final session. Peter Kirsten, who batted 568 minutes in the match, was twice fined for dissent. It was Hansie Cronje's first match as South Africa captain.

1972
A pretender is born. Franklyn Rose looked the part as a successor to Curtly Ambrose and Courtney Walsh when he became the first West Indian to take a six-for on debut, against India at Sabina Park in 1996-97, but he soon went off the boil. Fast and skiddy at his best, Rose could be inconsistent and wayward, and in England in 2000 he bowled woefully, his errant spell deciding the low-scoring Lord's Test when Dominic Cork cracked him for 4 and 6.

1979
Peter Fulton or "two-metre Peter", born today, made his New Zealand debut in ODIs in 2004. He scored his first hundred in his fifth game, against Sri Lanka in Napier. In eight World Cup games in 2007 he scored 297 at 37.12. He made his Test debut in March 2006 but was moved around the batting order and was unable to cement a place anywhere in the top 5. In 2007 he had to have surgery on his knee and struggled for consistency since then.

1995
A marvellous stand between Grant and Andy Flower against Pakistan in Harare. They put on 269 for the fourth wicket, passing the record of Ian and Greg Chappell (264) for brotherly Test partnerships. Grant went on to make an unbeaten 201, and in a collapse that would later raise a few eyebrows, Pakistan were bowled out for 322 and 158 to give Zimbabwe their first Test victory, in their 11th match, by an innings and 64 runs.

1881
Tip Snooke, born today, played 26 Tests for South Africa as a stylish right-hand batsman and right-arm fast-medium bowler. He was a regular member of the side before the First World War, captaining the team in the five-Test series against England in 1909-10. He was recalled and opened the attack against England as a 42-year-old in 1922-23. Snooke scored 1008 Test runs, making a century against Australia in Adelaide in 1910-11, and took 35 Test wickets.

1998
The day England won the World Cup. The under-19 World Cup, that is. They beat New Zealand in the final in Johannesburg by seven wickets, with Essex's Stephen Peters making 107. The squad had the likes of Robert Key, Chris Schofield, Owais Shah, Graeme Swann and Paul Frank.

Other birthdays
1910 Jahangir Khan (India)
1922 Clifford McWatt (West Indies)
1942 David Sincock (Australia)
1950 Naseer Malik (Pakistan)
1965 Dave Callaghan (South Africa)
1969 Mahbubur Rahman (Bangladesh)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Thu Jun 01, 2017 10:32 am

February 2 down the years
Hadlee's slow start

The great Sir Richard makes his debut


Richard Hadlee took 2 for 112 on debut


1973
New Zealand's greatest cricketer made his debut. Sir Richard Hadlee started fairly inauspiciously with 2 for 112 in the first Test against Pakistan in Wellington, and after 17 Tests he averaged 35. If he had been English, he might not have played again. Thankfully for New Zealand, he did - against England, and a ten-for in Wellington in 1977-78 sparked a great career.

1992
An awful innings from Graham Gooch - and a match-winning one too. Though he hardly middled a thing, Gooch somehow made 114 on a horrible Auckland pitch in the second Test against New Zealand. With Allan Lamb walloping a cheeky 47-ball 60, England were always in control. Their 168-run win made it four in a row - for the first time since 1979 - and confirmed New Zealand's first series defeat at home since 1978-79.

1961
In St Kitts, an England seamer with a Test average of exactly 20 was born. Joey Benjamin is a bit of a statistical freak, as he played only one Test, against South Africa at The Oval in 1994, when he was 33. A bustling, busy bowler, Benjamin took 4 for 42 in the first innings, helping England to a famous eight-wicket victory. He went on the Ashes tour that winter and played a couple of one-dayers, but never got near another Test appearance.

1988
David Boon saved the Bicentennial Test with a rugged, unbeaten 184 against England in Sydney. His 492-minute innings came after Australia had followed on, but on a pitch that was expected to turn, John Emburey and Eddie Hemmings toiled through 90 second-innings overs for one dismissal. That's a strike rate of 540 balls per wicket.

1992
You can't keep a good man down. Boon got yet another Test ton today, against India in Perth. The trampoline bounce meant that 33 out of 36 wickets fell to catches in this match - a Test record. Despite a sumptuous first-innings century from the 18-year-old Sachin Tendulkar, Australia won it by 300 runs to clinch a 4-0 thrashing when India collapsed from 82 for 0 to 141 all out on the last day, with Mike Whitney taking 7 for 27.

1968
Birth of Aminul Islam, the Bangladeshi who made a century in his country's inaugural Test. He was the third person to do so, after Australia's Charles Bannerman and Zimbabwe's Dave Houghton, but like Bangladesh, Islam struggled since that 145, which came against India in Dhaka in November 2000. He played his final Test in December 2002.

1985
Left-handed opener Upul Tharanga, born today, created a stir with two hundreds and a half-century in Sri Lanka's 5-0 victory over England in 2006. He scored three more half-centuries in the 2007 World Cup. While his one-day batting remained consistent, his Test form dipped, and he was dogged by inconsistency. He was dropped for four months after a tour to Australia but struck a scintillating 174 in Kingston on his return. While he continued to play ODIs, it was nearly seven years before he played another Test - against South Africa in 2014, whereupon he made 83.

2014
Karnataka won their seventh Ranji title, beating a listless Maharashtra by seven wickets in the final, in Hyderabad. Only Mumbai have won the title more times. Centuries from KL Rahul and Ganesh Satish, and Maharashtra's shoddy fielding, gave Karnataka a 210-run first-innings lead. Kedar Jadhav made a hundred in Maharashtra's second innings, helped along by some defensive fielding tactics, but the target of 157 in a little over two sessions was an easy one for Karnataka's batting line-up on day five.

2014
England's horrific Ashes campaign, in which they won only one match out of 13, finally came to an end with an 84-run defeat in the third T20, in Sydney. They suffered several casualties on the way: Jonathan Trott quit the tour after the first Test due to a stress-related illness, Graeme Swann retired before the fourth, Andy Flower, the director of cricket and mastermind of three Ashes wins, was asked to step down at the end of the tour, and Kevin Pietersen, their stormy petrel extraordinarire, was shown the door a few days later.

1892
The first Test hat-trick outside Melbourne. Johnny Briggs ended Australia's second innings on the fourth day in Sydney by dismissing Walter Giffen, Jack Blackham and Sydney Callaway off consecutive deliveries. Briggs was the third to achieve the feat - Frederick Spofforth and Billy Bates had done it previously, at the MCG in 1878-79 and 1882-83 - and the first in defeat. Australia won by 72 runs, after conceding a first-innings lead of 163.

1987
Birth of Imrul Kayes, the Bangladesh opening batsman who made his international debut in 2008, but lost his place in the one-day team after three low scores. When he was recalled in early 2010, Kayes made his maiden one-day hundred, in a loss in Christchurch. He did finally star in a victory when he scored a composed 60 in Bangladesh's World Cup win over England in 2011. In 2015, against Pakistan in Khulna, he hit 150 and added a Bangladesh record 312 for the first wicket with Tamim Iqbal. A year later, Kayes scored a crucial second-innings 78 in Bangladesh's historic win over England in Dhaka.

1995
Birth of Kusal Mendis, who announced himself in a crisis. In July 2016, when the 21-year-old walked out to bat in the second innings in Pallekele against Australia, Sri Lanka were 6 for 2 and 80 runs behind. He batted all day and when he was dismissed for 176 the next day, Sri Lanka were 204 runs ahead and on the way to a 106-run win. A month before the Pallekele Test, Mendis made 51 on one-day debut, against Ireland, and then reeled off four half-centuries in five innings, in ODIs against England and Australia.

Other birthdays
1949 Sunil Wettimuny (Sri Lanka)
1954 Jayantha Amerasinghe (Sri Lanka)
1969 Ijaz Ahmed jr (Pakistan)
1985 Vaughn van Jaarsveld (South Africa)


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Re: Re: 365 Days Of DOWN MEMORY LANE

Postby Misty » Thu Jun 01, 2017 10:35 am

:lmao: :dance: :rj:


February 3 down the years
Trouble in paradise

A controversy in Port-of-Spain




1974
When Bernard Julien played the last ball of the second day of the first Test between England and West Indies gently down the pitch, the non-striker, Alvin Kallicharran (142 not out), strode off for a well-earned rest. But Tony Greig threw down the stumps and appealed, and the umpire in question, Douglas Sang Hue, had little choice but to give Kallicharran run-out. It caused a huge furore, and eventually, after lengthy off-field discussions, Greig retracted his appeal.

1936
Birth of one of Australia's finest. Bob Simpson was a true allrounder: a dashing, fleet-footed strokeplayer with a penchant for big hundreds (he turned his maiden Test century into a mighty 311 against England at Old Trafford in 1964) a handy legspinner, a brilliant slip fielder, and later, a World Cup-winning coach in 1987 and an Ashes-regaining one in 1989. His Test career seemed to be over when he retired in 1967-68, but he came back ten years later to lead a young side gutted by defections to Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket.

1998
South Africa's hatred of all things Australian grew even more intense today when they failed to force the victory they needed to square the series, in Adelaide. But they only had themselves to blame: they dropped ten catches in the match, and picked a shockingly defensive side that had six batsmen plus Lance Klusener, Brian McMillan, Shaun Pollock and Pat Symcox. The tail wagged all right, but that wasn't South Africa's priority. Mark Waugh's 404-minute, unbeaten 115 was the match-saver, though the South Africans thought they had him on 105, when Waugh took one on the elbow and, disorientated, hit his own wicket. Because he was not playing at the ball, he was given not out.

1978
Winner takes all in the fifth Test, in Adelaide, where India gave Australia a real fright before surrendering the series 3-2. India needed an improbable 493 to win and fell a little short, on 445, the second-highest fourth-innings total in history at the time. At 323 for 4 it looked on, but Australia had the last laugh, with their 41-year-old captain Bob Simpson taking the final wicket.

1966
Danny Morrison, born today, was a genuine strike bowler, who as a result often went for a few runs. Morrison's ability to swing the ball made him a difficult proposition in his pomp, and though New Zealand won only two of his last 35 Tests, he was the catalyst each time, with 6 for 37 against Australia in Auckland in 1992-93, and eight wickets against Pakistan in Christchurch a year later. Ironically enough for such an incompetent batsman, Morrison's last act in Tests was a match-saving stand with Nathan Astle against England in Auckland in 1996-97.

1851
The birth of Lord Harris, the man who bestrode English - and world - cricket for five decades, first as a player and then as an administrator. A staunch defender of the spirit of the game, he took firm stands against many perceived vulgarities, especially throwing, and had the ability to make or break a career.

1997
Australia were slaughtered by West Indies in the fifth Test on an extraordinary pitch in Perth, the cracks in which were almost farcically wide; it didn't affect the series result, though: Australia won 3-2. With their 16th and 13th five-fors respectively, Curtly Ambrose and Courtney Walsh were the fissure kings. This was also the match in which Brian Lara, deputising for Walsh, first used his bowlers in single-over spells. Ambrose (whose ninth over in the second innings included nine no-balls) and Ian Bishop were given one on, one off.

1995
Not much brotherly love in the fifth Ashes Test in Perth, where Steve Waugh was left stranded on 99 not out... by his brother Mark, who, acting as a runner for the injured Craig McDermott, was run out after a comic mix-up. Waugh became only the second man after Geoff Boycott to be stranded on 99.

Other birthdays
1928 Chandrasekhar Gadkari (India)
1932 "Pom-Pom" Fellows-Smith (South Africa)
1941 Gary Bartlett (New Zealand)
1979 Paul Franks (England)
1985 Mandy Kornet (Netherlands)


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