2018 Commonwealth Games

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baggygreenmania
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2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Fri Mar 30, 2018 2:29 am

5 days 7 hours or April 4 till the greatest sporting event in this country in 12 years .. the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.
Did you know Australia is the most golden of all CG nations with 852 gold medals won since the first games back in 1930 in Canada. For those of you lucky to be seeing the CG live lucky you.. I was actually one of those lucky ones but holiday now ruined so will watch it on the box like most of my fellow Australians.

Nations participating‎: ‎71 Commonwealth Teams
Main venue‎: ‎Carrara Stadium
Host city‎: ‎Gold Coast, Queensland‎, Australia
Events‎: ‎275 in ‎19 sports

https://youtu.be/dJ9_BYa7q-Q

http://commonwealthgames.com.au/about-c ... -selected/

http://www.olympic.org.nz/games/gold-coast-2018/

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/spo ... -send-225-

https://teamengland.org/team-england-athletes

http://www.commonwealthgames.ca/team-ca ... index.html

http://teamwales.cymru/en/

https://www.teamscotland.scot/the-team/athletes/

https://www.gc2018.com/article/oceania- ... formance-f

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica_a ... alth_Games

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbados_ ... alth_Games
Last edited by baggygreenmania on Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:34 am, edited 5 times in total.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Fri Mar 30, 2018 2:47 am

I won't be watching it. Comm Games are as boring as batshit and 3rd rate.
Maybe QLD'ers will get into it, but I couldn't give AF.
No offence.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:10 am

Katto wrote:I won't be watching it. Comm Games are as boring as batshit and 3rd rate.
Maybe QLD'ers will get into it, but I couldn't give AF.
No offence.

Why mate. We have a proud history to uphold. Ok the Yanks and Chinese arent here .. only allows for more gold chances for our athletes. To take on the Poms and whip their ar**.. is reason alone to watch.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:29 am

baggygreenmania wrote:
Katto wrote:I won't be watching it. Comm Games are as boring as batshit and 3rd rate.
Maybe QLD'ers will get into it, but I couldn't give AF.
No offence.

Why mate. We have a proud history to uphold. Ok the Yanks and Chinese arent here .. only allows for more gold chances for our athletes. To take on the Poms and whip their ar**.. is reason alone to watch.

even the poms dont take it seriously any more, add the Jamaicans etc to that

the diamond league in europe is more lucrative for athletics events so there are a lot of stay aways and one's that come are not targeting this event as a priority so they're not tapered at the optimum levels

I've lost a lot of faith in athletics and swimming in general because of all the drug abuse

at least in cricket its a game of skill, even cheating doesn't assure victory

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:55 am

3 countries that normally do well in Commonwealth Games - Australia, England and India.

Australia and England are of course in a different league and are huge at the Olympics, England has improved tremendously. India has improved a lot but Indians are only tigers at Commonwealth and to some extent Asian Games. Its a flop show in Olympics (the Gold Medal at Commonwealth / Asian Games equals the bronze to 6th places at the Olympics).

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:57 am

bolero wrote:3 countries that normally do well in Commonwealth Games - Australia, England and India.

Australia and England are of course in a different league and are huge at the Olympics, England has improved tremendously. India has improved a lot but Indians are only tigers at Commonwealth and to some extent Asian Games. Its a flop show in Olympics (the Gold Medal at Commonwealth / Asian Games equals the bronze to 6th places at the Olympics).


India normally clean up in the shooting and archery events don't they?

We banned most guns in Australia and made it harder to own other guns. That's why we don't have free speech anymore.

England have gone way ahead of Australia in all Olympic sports as they have more funding allocated and probably better drugs.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Fri Mar 30, 2018 4:00 am

India in last 7 Commonwealth games.

Year Gold Silver Bronze TotalPosition

1990 13 8 11 32 5th
1994 6 12 7 25 6th
1998 7 10 8 25 7th
2002 30 22 17 69 4th
2006 22 17 11 50 4th
2010 38 27 36 101 2nd
2014 15 30 19 64 5th

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Fri Mar 30, 2018 4:10 am

Katto wrote:
bolero wrote:3 countries that normally do well in Commonwealth Games - Australia, England and India.

Australia and England are of course in a different league and are huge at the Olympics, England has improved tremendously. India has improved a lot but Indians are only tigers at Commonwealth and to some extent Asian Games. Its a flop show in Olympics (the Gold Medal at Commonwealth / Asian Games equals the bronze to 6th places at the Olympics).


India normally clean up in the shooting and archery events don't they?

We banned most guns in Australia and made it harder to own other guns. That's why we don't have free speech anymore.

England have gone way ahead of Australia in all Olympic sports as they have more funding allocated and probably better drugs.


Yes, what you said is true.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Boycs » Fri Mar 30, 2018 9:02 am

Oh Katto

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Fri Mar 30, 2018 9:11 am

Boycs wrote:Oh Katto


yeah we are finding out all about Team Sky now

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Fri Mar 30, 2018 12:48 pm

England have gone way ahead of Australia in all Olympic sports as they have more funding allocated .

Not swimming.. never. Even tho we had multiple favorites that choked we still medalled more than GB at Rio.. Only the Yanks outrate us.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Sat Mar 31, 2018 1:32 am


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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Mon Apr 02, 2018 6:23 am

The Indian team have been caught with needles in their rooms.
Nothing untoward says Times of India.
okay.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:40 am

Katto wrote:The Indian team have been caught with needles in their rooms.
Nothing untoward says Times of India.
okay.


NADA is very strict nowadays. In junior level in India, doping is rampant in some disciplines like weightlifting.

When many people were caught by NADA in India, India had at one stage decided few years ago not to send any weightlifting sportspersons for international events. There was a cleanup done, not a massive one though.

Dont know the current status.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:41 am

This happened in 2015, check below link. It was decided post that , even if no medals are won, India will not send tainted athletes.

https://www.firstpost.com/sports/doping ... 85309.html

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Tue Apr 03, 2018 1:32 am

bolero wrote:This happened in 2015, check below link. It was decided post that , even if no medals are won, India will not send tainted athletes.

https://www.firstpost.com/sports/doping ... 85309.html

India has been exonerated of any doping claims. Not explained what was in needles but obviously no traces of performance enhancing substrances. India tho will be penalised as Games Commitee has a zero tolerance policy on syringe use in the village unless physcician-ordered.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Tue Apr 03, 2018 1:37 am

1Day- 08Hours- 18Mins to go till Opening Ceremony.
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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Tue Apr 03, 2018 1:38 am

Aussies usually bring home a swag of cycling medals/ http://commonwealthgames.com.au/track-c ... ady-to-go/

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Tue Apr 03, 2018 1:47 am

Still unable to post fotos here?

The last time the CG were held in the northern state was 1982.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhxTjg1Jkvo.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Wed Apr 04, 2018 7:24 am

Hockey men's competition will be between Australia and India, I pip Australia for the Gold.

Shooting and wrestling, expect India to do well. Boxing and weightlifting too india may do ok.

Javelin - Neeraj Chopra hoping for a medal from him.

India are nowhere in track and field and swimming, so not hoping for much there.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:16 am

The guy running the CG (former Premier) said the CG will be clean and no cheating unlike Cricket.

(Which means they'll turn a blind eye to drugs so the syringe-gate affair will go way.)

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:54 am

CWG: India’s top medal contenders

ATHLETICS

NEERAJ CHOPRA (JAVELIN THROW)

In athletics, 20-year-old javelin thrower Neeraj Chopra would be India’s top gold medal prospect despite the presence of several track and field veterans in the contingent. Chopra, who caught the nation’s attention with a sensational gold in the U-20 world championships in 2016 with a junior world record effort, has it in him to claim the top spot in the CWG. Though his personal best is 86.48m, a throw similar to his season best of 85.94m — achieved in Patiala last month — should be enough to clinch top honours in Gold Coast. In Glasgow CWG, four years back, Julius Yego of Kenyta had claimed the javelin gold with 83.87m.

BOXING
VIKAS KRISHAN (MEN’S 75 KG)

The charismatic Vikas Krishan shot into limelight, winning gold at the 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou. Ever since, it’s been a bit of a rollercoaster ride for the boxer from Haryana. He won bronze at the 2014 Incheon Asiad in the 75kg category. The 26-year-old is back in form, winning the best boxer award at the Strandja Memorial in Bulgaria recently. He claimed gold in the competition, overcoming World Championship bronze-medallist Troy Isley, and is fancied to lead India’s charge.

MANOJ KUMAR (MEN’S 69 KG)
At 31, Manoj is a vastly experienced campaigner. He will try to rekindle the highs of 2010 CWG in New Delhi where he triumphed with frenzied spectators in the boxing arena bringing down the house. In the 2014 Glasgow Games, Manoj was knocked out in the quarterfinals. The Arjuna awardee had to stay satisfied with a bronze medal at the recently concluded India Open International tournament in the capital.

LAISHRAM SARITA DEVI (WOMEN’S 60 KG)
Along with the illustrious MC Mary Kom, L Sarita Devi has been a torch-bearer for women’s boxing in the country. However, despite her numerous achievements, including gold at the 2006 World Championships and silver at the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games, the weight of the 2014 Asiad controversy hangs heavy on her shoulders. She was extremely disappointed after the judges ruled that her opponent Park Ji-Na of Korea had beaten her in the semifinal. The Indian felt cheated and at the medal awarding ceremony, a tearful Devi refused to accept her bronze and was banned by the world body for a year.

BADMINTON
PV SINDHU
Olympic silver medallist PV Sindhu is the favourite to win the women’s singles gold. The 22-year-old, who had won bronze in 2014, will look to make amends. In Glasgow too, Sindhu was expected to win gold but was shocked by Canada’s Michelle Li in the semifinals. In the last four years since, Sindhu has achieved a lot, winning many titles and also becoming the world No. 2. Though she suffered a minor injury last week, Sindhu returned to court on Sunday and looked completely fit. With no big shuttler apart from her illustrious senior Saina Nehwal in the fray, Sindhu knows that she needs to beat the former world No.1 to finish on top.

SAINA NEHWAL
Saina Nehwal’s career started with the 2006 Commonwealth Games, when the then Indian coach Vimal Kumar preferred her ahead of Aparna Popat. Saina did not look back after that. Interestingly, her 2010 women’s singles gold at the New Delhi CWG catapulted her to international glory. She won close to 20 international titles after that. At 28, Saina is looking to extend her career with another superlative performance at the CWG. It’s clear that the only challenger to Saina is Sindhu. The lastminute injury scare to Sindhu has put more responsibility on Saina’s shoulders as coach Pullela Gopichand may prefer her for the team event which is scheduled to begin on April 5.

KIDAMBI SRIKANTH
World No. 2 Kidambi Srikanth was on a roll in 2017, winning four Super Series titles and was within striking distance of becoming No. 1. Srikanth, who won a bronze at the 2014 Games, needs to work hard to win gold now. Malaysian legend and former world No. 1 Lee Chong Wei and HS Prannoy are in Srikanth’s path to glory. Beating Chong Wei is not easy and Prannoy is always a tough nut to crack. Unless another shuttler produces a major upset, which appears highly unlikely, these three shuttlers are strong favourites to win gold in men’s singles

SQUASH
DIPIKA- JOSHANA
Four years ago in Glasgow, the duo of Dipika Pallikal Karthik and Joshana Chinappa created history by winning the country’s first-ever gold medal in squash. Four years on, it’s rather telling that the dream of another medal rests once again on these two tried-and-tested veterans of the game.
Seeded third among women’s doubles, Dipika and Joshana are placed in Pool C along with Wales, Pakistan and Malta. With the top two teams making it to the main round, Dipika and Joshana are expected to have it easy. The real challenge that awaits them is in the knockout stages where they will have to fight it out against top-ranked players from Australia, England and New Zealand. Although it won’t be a cakewalk for the two at Gold Coast, Dipika and Joshana offer the best chance for a medal in squash.

SHOOTING

JITU RAI (50M PISTOL AND 10M AIR PISTOL):
Only an empty pistol can keep Jitu Rai away from the podium finish as the army shooter will probably face the weakest field in the 50m pistol event ever since he began shooting. The only competition Jitu will face, in both, 50m and 10m air pistol events, would be from compatriot Om Mitharwal. With the young Mitharwal in fray, India can hope for a 1-2 finish on podium.
Considering Jitu’s bronze finish in the World Cup in Guadalajara last month, Jitu is expected win gold in both the pistol events. While he had finished 10th in 10m air pistol at Glasgow, Jitu will be defending his 50m pistol title.

APURVI CHANDELA (10M AIR RIFLE)
The heart-breaking 34th place finish at the Rio Games two years ago had taken a toll on Apurvi Chandela. The Jaipur shooter then looked like a shadow of her former self. But the shooter is back in medal contention with a silver finish in the Nationals in December last year. Although she didn’t win a medal in the Guadalajara World Cup, she made it to the final with a decent score of 626.8. In Gold Coast, Apurvi will be defending the 10m air rifle gold that she had won in the Glasgow. She will get a tough fight from young Indian Mehuli Ghosh.

MEHULI GHOSH (10M AIR RIFLE)
Mehuli Ghosh, 18, is not an unknown name anymore. The West Bengal shooter, who had won eight gold and three bronze medals at the Nationals, made her senior World Cup debut special by winning bronze in the women’s 10m air rifle event in Guadalajara last month. There are high chances of Mehuli winning her first Commonwealth Games medal. With a small field of only 18 shooters, Mehuli will be one of the favourites to win gold.

MANU BHAKER (10M AIR PISTOL)
Considering her current form, Manu Bhaker, 16, is safely India’s best bet to win gold in Gold Coast.
Other than sweeping the senior (above 21), junior (U-21) and youth (U-18) National titles in December last year, the Haryana girl has won four World Cup gold medals (2 senior, 2 junior), including a Junior world record on debut last month. Though Manu shoots in 10m air pistol and 25m pistol events, she will be competing only in the 10m event at Gold Coast. And like many other Indian shooters, her biggest challenge would also come from an Indian — Heena Sidhu in her case. This will be Manu’s first Commonwealth Games.

ANKUR MITTAL (DOUBLE TRAP)
The former World No. 1 double trapper will shoot in his second CWG. Mittal, who had finished fourth in Glasgow, will probably face the toughest field, compared to his Indian teammates. The Delhi-based shooter will probably shoot in the Olympicdiscarded event, double trap, for the last time as he plans to switch to trap. The Indian will be challenged by defending champion and Rio Olympics bronze medallist Steven Scott of England.

GYMNASTICS
ARUNA BUDDA REDDY
Aruna Budda Reddy will love to be back in Australia. Just over a month back, she created history by becoming the first Indian gymnast to clinch an individual medal at the Gymnastics World Cup in Melbourne. This week, the 22-year-old will be carrying hopes of medal in Gold Coast. A black belt holder, Aruna’s father Narayan Reddy was instrumental in shifting her to gymnastics at the age of eight. She won her first National medal in 2005. It has been a steady progress for the Hyderabad girl. After that she participated in World Championships in 2013, 2014 and 2017 in Antwerp, Nanning and Montreal respectively. However, she failed to progress beyond the qualifying rounds.

HOCKEY
MEN’S TEAM

When Sjoerd Marijne took over as the coach of the Indian men’s hockey team, one of his first mission statements was for the Commonwealth Games. It said — target gold. On April 7, when Manpreet Singh and his men take on Pakistan in their opener, it will be a definitive step in the direction. The fact that the 18 players in Gold Coast haven’t played together as a unit in any major event – with Vishnu Prasad in the midfield and Dilpreet Singh in the forward line being raw talent – could be a drawback. The conversion rate of the forwardline continues to be a cause of concern. That said, the two-time silver medalists have worked hard over the past year and most of them are at their peak in terms of form, fitness and confidence. The team should be weary of losing to lower-ranked teams.

WOMEN’S TEAM
Women’s chief coach Harendra Singh has struck a fine balance of experience and young talent. With an eye on the podium —which they last climbed as champions at the 2002 Manchester Games— the team management has stretched itself to make this team a competitive unit. While they still lack speed, they are not found wanting on skills or fitness. Their campaign will primarily depend on their ability to handle pressure, execution of plans and penalty corner conversions. The experience of Savita in the cage and skipper Rani in the frontline will form the crux of India’s campaign. It is also a good opportunity for some of the senior players to erase the scares of having finished last at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

WRESTLING
VINESH PHOGAT
It was heartbreaking for Vinesh Phogat in Rio Olympics, when her run ended in tears due to injury in the quarterfinal. She was one of the sure-shot medallists for the country, but injured her knee during her match against China’s Sun Yanan. She had to be stretchered off from the mat. That memory still haunts Vinesh and according to the champion wrestler only a gold at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games would prove as a balm. She is the defending CWG champion, having won the gold in 2014, and stands a good chance of repeating that feat. Her recent form is good – she won silver in the 2017 and 2018 Asian Wrestling Championship. Vinesh will be participating in the 50kg freestyle category.

SAKSHI MALIK
After her bronze medal-winning feat in Rio, Sakshi has become a doyen of Indian wrestling. Post her Olympic medal, Sakshi was awarded the Rajiv Khel Ratna Award and the Padma Shri. She would love to convert her 2014 CWG silver medal into gold this time. Her Olympic bronze came in the 58kg weight category. Sakshi moved up to the 62kg weight class last year. This transition was well-planned. First, she moved to the 60kg weight class and won silver at the 2017 Asian Wrestling Championship in New Delhi. Then at the Commonwealth Wrestling Championship in Johannesburg she won gold in the 62 kg weight category. Recently, she won gold in the same weight class at the 2018 Asian Wrestling Championship in Kyrgyzstan.

BAJRANG PUNIA
Bajrang Punia is India’s best bet in men’s freestyle wrestling in Gold Coast. He will participate in the 65kg weight class. In the last two years, Bajrang has emerged from the shadows of his mentor Yogeshwar Dutt and has held his own. After Yogeshwar’s failure in Rio Olympics, Bajrang assumed the role of the lead wrestler in the 65kg weight category. As Yogeshwar took a sabbatical from the mat, Bajrang won the country medals at the World, Asian and Commonwealth level. He bagged silver in the 2017 World U-23 Wrestling Championships, gold at the 2017 Commonwealth Wrestling Championship, gold at 2017 Asian Wrestling Championships and recently a bronze at the 2018 Asian Wrestling Championships. Like Sakshi, Bajrang too won a silver (in 61kg weight class) in the 2014 CWG and is likely to go a step higher this time.

SUSHIL KUMAR
Double Olympic-medallist Sushil Kumar would aim for a golden hat-trick. Sushil claimed the top position in the previous two editions. Pehelwaan ji, as Sushil is called by his mates at the Chhatrasal Akhada, would be competing in the 74kg freestyle category. After missing the Rio Olympics on a controversial note, Sushil returned to the mat just last year. He won gold at the Nationals when three wrestlers forfeited their match. Then his followers allegedly assaulted fellow grappler Parveen Rana during the selection trials for CWG, earlier this year. The build-up has been far from ideal for the 34-year-old. But Sushil has experience on his side and CWG generally has a relatively weaker level of competition. The gold he won at the 2017 Commonwealth Wrestling Championship is a prime example of that. Therefore, another gold is very much in sight.

WEIGHTLIFTING
MIRABAI CHANU
She won a silver in the 2014 Commonwealth Games and four years down the line, the lifter from Manipur would be keen to improve her standing in Gold Coast. In between, the 23-year-old faced both lows as well as highs as she tried to establish herself as the top woman lifter of the country. She had a disappointing show in Rio when she failed to failed to register any weight against her name. But she bounced back in style by claiming the gold in the World Championship in USA last year, with a world record to boot.

SANJITA CHANU
Mirabai’s statemate Sanjita was the better of the two when the duo fought for the gold medal in the Glasgow Games. But there won’t be any contest between the two in Gold Coast this time as Sanjita has since changed her weight category from 48 kg to 53 kg, while Mirabai has remained in 48kg. The 24-year-old, who took to the sport after getting inspired by the legendary N Kunjurani Devi, made it to the Gold Coast CWG by winning Commonwealth Championships held last year at the same venue.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/spo ... 605923.cms

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:27 am

I heard it was raining so I switched on the opening ceremony. This is so bad. Aussies should just skip opening ceremonies.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:50 pm

Everyone enjoy the Indigenous Australian Show.. aka The Gold Coast CG Opening Ceremony? That aside the lite show and final scene were spectacular.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:07 pm

Scroll.in



INDIAN HOCKEY
Chris Ciriello, India’s nemesis in last two CWG finals, now wants to win gold for Marijne’s men


The Australian, who is the analytical coach of the Indian men’s hockey team, had scored against them in the last two summit clashes.


by Bibhash Chatterjee
Published Mar 14, 2018 · 05:45 pm Updated Mar 14, 2018 · 05:46 pm.


In the last two Commonwealth Games, the Indian men’s hockey team finished second, losing both finals to Australia. Next month, in Gold Coast, Australia, India will be hoping to turn the tables on the top-ranked team in the world, and helping them in their mission is former Australia drag-flick specialist Chris Ciriello.

The Australian, who had scored in both finals against India, including a hat-trick in the 2014 final in Glasgow, was recently roped in by Hockey India to be the analytical coach of the men’s team.

“Chris has scored a hat-trick thrice in the World Cup and in the Commonwealth Games,” said India head coach Sjoerd Marijne. “So, he knows how to deal with pressure. Only by saying that, players will have confidence in them. On the New Zealand tour, we scored more penalty corners with his corrections.”

Indian connect
Ciriello’s mother was born in Kolkata and was an Anglo-Indian. His grandfather, who also played hockey, used to head the customs department in Calcutta. Eventually they moved to Melbourne where his grandfather started coaching kids. “He coached my father and that is how my parents met,” said Ciriello.

The half-Italian, half-Anglo-Indian is eager to strengthen the Indian team in a crucial year, where they will compete in the Commonwealth Games in April, the Asian Games in August and the Hockey World Cup in November.

“My focus is to make the culture better,” said Ciriello. “I don’t care if you are 18 and just played five games or if you are Manpreet who has played over 150 games. The thing is as soon as you are on the field, you have to have that winning mentality. You must have good discipline.”

The 32-year-old retired as a player last year and has been coaching since 18 at his academy back home. “I have coached first division men and women, second division players in Perth,” he said. “I’ve had my coaching academy for over eight years. I was working with the Under-21 Australian team as well before I came here. It will be a good experience to work with a good group and also making them more competitive and wanting to win.”

While this will be his first stint with a senior national squad, Ciriello has started having a positive effect on the team already. “It’s not only about the drag flickers,” said India captain Manpreet Singh. “On the field, he’s always motivating other players. On the ground, he had a winning mentality. He’s achieved everything. So, it’s good for us that we can learn a lot from him. I am learning a lot of things from him. My mentality is getting changed now.”

Penalty-corner conversions
Ciriello knows that India’s defence needs strengthening but penalty-corner conversion, for a while now, has been their Achilles’s heel. At the Sultan Azlan Shah Cup, India managed to convert only six PCs out of 26. The road ahead for Ciriello is tough but he is up for the task.

“It is a matter of getting better,” he said. “We need to improve pushing, we need to improve tracking and we need to improve accuracy. Every country in the world wants to score 100% penalty corners. Every country wants to save a penalty corner. So we need to work on the details together and work on some variations, which India has lacked. India have got good flickers but you need to have patience of direct flicking and variations.”

Ciriello said that the job doesn’t start and end at flicking and that is something that the Indians have to understand. Variations, he said, alone cannot ensure that a PC will be converted all the time. “There are 100 different types of variations that one can do,” said Ciriello, who played for Punjab Warriors in the Hockey India League.

“But it is not only up to the flickers. It is something that everyone in India must understand. If the pushing is not quick enough and the trapping is not good enough, then you have only 33% of chances of converting. If the pushing is not straight or clean it is very hard, if the trapping is not hard, then it is very hard,” he added.

First test, the CWG
Ciriello joined India during their tour of New Zealand and his effect was immediate as the team smashed 11 goals in the second part of the four-game tour. He wants to make them more competitive and play as a unit.

“What we do is divide the boys in two teams and work on team building exercises,” he said. “We monitor the game and act like strict umpires. We point out things like arguing and poor tackling. I want them to improve because we have to be better than the other issues we face such as umpiring or problems with each other.”

At the CWG, Ciriello is going to go all out and ensure India win gold. “I am here to do my job. I am here to win. In the last two Commonwealth Games, I won my gold medals against India. This time I would like to change that. I like to win. I don’t like losing and I want to win again,” he said.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:40 am

Gold Coast triathlete Ashleigh Gentle had the local conditions, climate and crowd in her favor but could only finish out of a place in the first medal deciding race of these Games. Bermuda's world champion Flora Duffy took the gold.
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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:43 am

My fave sport swimming is about to get underway. England, Wales and fast improving Canada will be Australia's major rivals. Never discount the Sth Africans either.
https://www.swimming.org.au/Home/Common ... -Team.aspx
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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 1:21 am

Interesting news from the swimming. For the first time that I can remember in Comm Games history.. disabled athletes will swim in the same meet as their able bodied team mates.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 3:23 am

baggygreenmania wrote:My fave sport swimming is about to get underway. England, Wales and fast improving Canada will be Australia's major rivals. Never discount the Sth Africans either.
https://www.swimming.org.au/Home/Common ... -Team.aspx


Australia are world champions in swimming. Canada will provide good competition.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 3:24 am

Lifter P Gururaja opens India's medals tally. Silver in 56 kg category.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:09 am


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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:10 am

What a day for Matt Hauser.. defeating the Rio Olympic gold and silver medallists in the Mens Triathlon. Finished just out of the medals in his first ever major senior meet. Team mate Jake Birtwhistle had to follow gold medalist Henri Schoeman home to win the silver and Australias first medal of these games.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:11 am

bolero wrote:
baggygreenmania wrote:My fave sport swimming is about to get underway. England, Wales and fast improving Canada will be Australia's major rivals. Never discount the Sth Africans either.
https://www.swimming.org.au/Home/Common ... -Team.aspx


Australia are world champions in swimming. Canada will provide good competition.
Not quite world champs bolero.. the Americans have that honor.. Australia follow a close second or third.
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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:25 am

Close second, yes. But in Commonwealth, there are no Americans or Dutch. Its an open field for Ausyralia in swimming except Canada and to some extent England.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:28 am

bolero wrote:Close second, yes. But in Commonwealth, there are no Americans or Dutch. Its an open field for Ausyralia in swimming except Canada and to some extent England.
Yes the leading Commonwealth swimming nation. Never been beaten in the pool in CG history...to my knowledge.

Whar sports will both India and Australia compete in .. shooting?
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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:29 am

Hopeless at athletics though.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:31 am

Katto wrote:Hopeless at athletics though.
Yep you could posibly count our Olympic champs on both hands.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:37 am

baggygreenmania wrote:
bolero wrote:Close second, yes. But in Commonwealth, there are no Americans or Dutch. Its an open field for Ausyralia in swimming except Canada and to some extent England.
Yes the leading Commonwealth swimming nation. Never been beaten in the pool in CG history...to my knowledge.

Whar sports will both India and Australia compete in .. shooting?


Hockey. Last 2 Commonwealth Games, Australia men's team beat Indian men's team in final, rather walloped them.

There is a relatively new coach for India, Dutchman Sjoerd Marijne. A lot of coaches who wanted to do good were kicked out like Terry Walsh (Australia), Oltmans (Holland). Its a very tricky position to be.

Indian style is basically attacking and cannot adapt to a Spanish or Argentinian style of play. Australia's is a mix of attack and defence.

That is why Australian style of play is more suitable for Indian to adapt rather than the European German or Spanish style.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:51 am

I don't know anything about hockey, but is it a case of Spanish and Argentinian playing with similar philosophy for football? ie very skillful and high possession? German being very tactical...and Australia just being physical (a bit thuggish) and direct, relying on fitness?

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby squarecut » Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:23 am

Indian style of hockey is basically showing off hockey stick skills and creating chances only to fail to score. Western style is to get a penalty corner and then score off that penalty corner. Yes, football playing nations, when they took to hockey took control of FIH and tweaked the rules to make the game similar to football.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:39 am

:lol: I sense some frustration

squarecut wrote:Indian style of hockey is basically showing off hockey stick skills and creating chances only to fail to score. Western style is to get a penalty corner and then score off that penalty corner. Yes, football playing nations, when they took to hockey took control of FIH and tweaked the rules to make the game similar to football.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby Katto » Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:42 am

yeah I don't really like the penalty corner aspect of field hockey

I'd rather it be more like ice hockey and see more chances one on one with the keeper

maybe less players on the field would allow more goals to be scored without penalty corners...or better yet, maybe bigger sized goals

I think if this game rewarded skill more then Australia would struggle as practicing skills to the Nth degree is not in our culture.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby baggygreenmania » Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:59 am

bolero wrote:
baggygreenmania wrote:Yes the leading Commonwealth swimming nation. Never been beaten in the pool in CG history...to my knowledge.

Whar sports will both India and Australia compete in .. shooting?


Hockey. Last 2 Commonwealth Games, Australia men's team beat Indian men's team in final, rather walloped them.

There is a relatively new coach for India, Dutchman Sjoerd Marijne. A lot of coaches who wanted to do good were kicked out like Terry Walsh (Australia), Oltmans (Holland). Its a very tricky position to be.

Indian style is basically attacking and cannot adapt to a Spanish or Argentinian style of play. Australia's is a mix of attack and defence.

That is why Australian style of play is more suitable for Indian to adapt rather than the European German or Spanish style.
Hockey of course. There used to be some great clashes between India and the Aussies in years gone by. India went off the boil for several years but have re-emerged now as a world force.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 6:24 am

India's first gold in the event.

Lifter Mirabai Chanu breaks CWG record , wins Gold in 48 KG women's event.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:18 am

Katto wrote:I don't know anything about hockey, but is it a case of Spanish and Argentinian playing with similar philosophy for football? ie very skillful and high possession? German being very tactical...and Australia just being physical (a bit thuggish) and direct, relying on fitness?


Yes, the Europeans - Spanish , german , Dutch approach hockey with the same mindset as they approach football.

Same with Argentina. They are a little physical in their hockey.

Belgium is also a very good team, so is South Africa. England is a top team. Australia in top 2 in world hockey at all times. India somewhere between 5 and 8 in world hockey.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:25 am

As per current World rankings in men's hockey (FIH rankings)

1. Australia
2. Argentina
3. Belgium
4. Netherlands
5. Germany
6. India
7. England
8. Spain
9. New Zealand
10. Ireland
11. Canada
12. Malaysia
13. Pakistan
14. South Korea
15. South Africa

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:40 am

This is what the former Indian coaches think of the Indian hockey team. They are scathing of the administrators.

----------------

‘I was treated like a monkey; administrators have no knowledge’

Jose Brasa, Chief coach (2009 to 2010)


Days before I was officially appointed as the coach in 2009, I rang up Ric Charlesworth to find out how it was to work in India. He said to me: “Please, please, please don’t go there. Within a month, you will be angry and frustrated.” I noted his point but did not let it influence my decision.

As it would eventually turn out, Ric was spot on. In my short stint in India, I was treated like a monkey. Sports Authority of India (SAI) and Hockey India thought they knew more about the sport than coaches and the players. They still continue to feel they know everything. Together, they pulled the strings and made us dance to their tunes.

Letting Paul van Ass go is a big mistake. He is a wonderful coach and has done really good things in his short stint in India. Hockey India may get a coach who will obey their orders, but if van Ass goes now, it will be difficult for them to find a coach with a strong personality and wisdom.

If anyone, it is the president Narinder Batra who should go. I believe he lacks basic respect for people and is not a good manager. I remember when the players went on strike before the World Cup in 2010, he did not handle the situation well at all. Instead of understanding plight of the players, he punished them for their conduct. Players were fighting for their rights. They had not been paid for two, three years. How could anybody do that! Even today, coaches who dare to raise their voice against the system are sacked without any reason. It’s not just Hockey India. The Sports Authority of India (SAI) too is equally clueless. Prabir Krishna, who was one of the leading SAI officials back then, made life very difficult for me.

They tried to remove me from my job. Since they did not have a good enough reason, they played dirty games. First, they stopped giving me leaves so I could not visit my home in Spain. Then, they did not allow me to attend an International Hockey Federation coaching course, where I was an instructor. The federation had invited me but still the officials did not allow me. Then, they started paying only half my salary.

It was torturous but the only thing that kept me going was the players. They are the real diamonds of Indian hockey and keep it shining. But with so many hurdles for foreign coaches, it becomes very difficult for us to function in an efficient manner. And in India, the administrators are killing the game.

Hockey India chief Narinder Batra retorts:

I was barely a couple of months into the job as HI secretary when Jose Brasa was fired. He had been having issues for a long time and I had to be the messenger. From what I could gather, there was evidence against him which indicated that he used to tell players to buy equipment from a firm in Spain. It did not make sense because there are other better manufacturers. I wasn’t even involved when he was appointed the coach. Someone had to tell him he was being sacked and being the secretary, it was my duty.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:41 am

‘There is no problem with administrators, it is the players’ attitude that needs to change’

Michael Nobbs, Chief coach (2011-2013)


I must admit, while I was the coach of Indian team, I passed out on several occasions, once during a tournament in Holland. My blood pressure had shot up and it took me nearly six months after I quit to recover fully.

It’s the most high-pressure job in international hockey. Because everyone is so invested emotionally in it. And as a foreign coach coming into the set-up, you need to realise that first.

We tend to adopt a very practical approach to everything — be it demanding facilities, dealing with administrators or interacting with players.

But pragmatism needs to be balanced well with humour and emotional attachment if a coach wants to succeed in India.

A lot of fingers have been pointed towards Mr Batra and Hockey India during the Paul van Ass episode. And I am extremely surprised why. I feel Mr Batra is the best man to run Indian hockey.

He understands what needs to be done and how it needs to be done. Sometimes, he does things which are perceived to be arrogant and authoritarian. But it’s more emotional than anything.

When I was there, there were some hurdles, but those issues exist everywhere and you should know how to handle them. Coaches need to realise that they have to achieve a lot more in India in a limited budget. Terry Walsh had no financial hurdles in USA and Paul did not have to worry about it in Holland. But the pressure of delivering results in limited facilities was always going to be tough.

And in focussing only on the coach-versus-administration issue, we miss the overall picture. Most Indian players are extremely skilful and willing to do anything for the team. But there are many who play just to secure their spot in the team. They do not care about the team’s results. I have faced such issues myself.

The players, though priceless, need to change their attitude. Eventually, it’s they who will change the face of Indian hockey. Not administrators or coaches.

Hockey India chief Narinder Batra retorts:

We shared a very cordial relationship. He had to leave because he was unwell. There was nothing else to it. We are still in touch.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:41 am

‘India has been making progress but they keep chopping and changing’

Ric Charlesworth, (Technical Director – 2008)


It was a leap into the unknown for both parties back then. I had never been to India as a coach before so had absolutely no idea what to expect. At the same time, my employers had never before brought in a technical director so they too did not know what to expect.

It got worse when (IHF president) KPS Gill and (secretary) K Jyothikumaran were sacked. There was no direction and leadership after that.

Things have improved now. In Narinder Batra, you have a strong leader. But he should let the coach do his job. India have made a lot of progress. Right now, the team is ranked eighth in the world. Four years later, you will be in contention for medals. But the chopping and changing of coaches needs to stop. It’s a disturbing trend that even when the top leadership has changed, the policy of hiring and firing coaches has continued.

Jose Brasa, who came to India after me, did a good job. Michael Nobbs did a good job. Terry Walsh did a very good job and Paul van Ass did not stay long enough to do anything. You need a long tenure as a coach, not just one year or five months. It’s a long process, you need to give the coach at least four years and make him lead the programme.

Even during my time as the coach of the Mumbai team in Hockey India League, the owners interfered in a lot of things. People in power need to show trust in the coach and allow him to run the programme. It has also affected the overall programme. The development plan for juniors is affected. The HIL provides that option, it gives youngsters a chance to interact with top international players. But the programme below that is a worry. Look at India’s performance in the last junior World Cup!

Things are improving in India and there are still opportunities galore. Many foreign coaches see India as the home of the game. So they see it as an exciting opportunity. The players are extremely skilled and it’s great to work with them. You still have Roelant Oltmans. He is a capable person and very knowledgeable. He is the right person to take over. He knows the players and knows what is there.

But for the long-term betterment of the sport in India, this chop-and-change policy needs to change.

# Batra wasn’t in charge when Charlesworth was around.

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Re: 2018 Commonwealth Games

Postby bolero » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:42 am

‘Case of ego prevailing over general common sense’

Terry Walsh, (Chief coach, 2013 to 2014)


The key to success in any field is to be aware of what’s going on globally. Hockey India and Sports Authority of India, sadly, are not. They are completely out of sync, not just between them and what their objective is, but also to the demands of modern hockey.

After Paul van Ass was appointed as my successor, I thought it was a good decision by the federation because at the moment, he is one of the best guys in the business. To see him leave India just after five months into the job is saddening. I do not know what happened between him and Narinder Batra. However, having experienced the Indian sporting bureaucracy myself, I can take a wild guess. And I know I won’t be a hundred percent wrong in assuming that Paul is a victim here. I am not suggesting that Paul or myself are best suited for the job. There are many others who can do it better than me. But Hockey India needs to give a better account of themselves. They need to take a long, hard look at what they are doing and how they are doing it. And hopefully after that, they’ll realise what’s happening is inappropriate.

During my stay in India, I tried my best in getting a better protocol, streamline the structure that at present is so haphazard. Let me make it clear, I wasn’t asking anything for myself. All I did was to establish a greater say for high performance director Roelant Oltmans. He is the man responsible for the sport side of Hockey India and needs to be empowered. At least that’s what I felt. Unfortunately, Hockey India and Sports Authority of India did not agree with me.

It’s a case of some people’s ego prevailing over general common sense. Even though I wasn’t present there, I saw India play at the Hockey World League in Belgium and felt very disappointed. They’ve lost quite a bit of ground and I can’t blame the players because they’ve been pushed through a series of cultural changes with so many coaches in and out. Brasa brought in European knowledge and tried to club it with the Asian style. Nobbs succeeded him and he spent a lot of time doing nothing. Then, I mixed the Australian and Asian style. Now, Van Ass brought in the European model again. Consequently, Indian hockey is deteriorating with each passing month. The administrators claim they have the best interest of the sport in mind. But they need to back their actions as well.

Hockey India chief Narinder Batra retorts:

I don’t understand why do we adopt such double standards. If an Indian is caught in financial fraud, we are over-eager to lynch him. Just because he is a foreigner does not mean he is innocent. I found out pretty late that he was involved in financial misappropriation in USA. We asked for an explanation from him which he did not have. How can we have such a person in charge of the team?

http://indianexpress.com/article/sports ... h-diaries/